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  • An Introduction to the Engagement Spectrum

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/27/2013

    Take a closer look at participation conditions and behaviors to consider when developing audience engagement programming. Artist and engagement strategist Rachel Grossman will review categories of participant-types, environmental factors, and communication tools, and share examples of tactics and activities with multiple points of entry for a range of audience members. This webinar will also provide insight into drawing connecting threads from your artistic programming to your marketing and advertising.

    Take a closer look at participation conditions and behaviors to consider when developing audience engagement programming. Artist and engagement strategist Rachel Grossman will review categories of participant-types, environmental factors, and communication tools, and share examples of tactics and activities with multiple points of entry for a range of audience members. This webinar will also provide insight into drawing connecting threads from your artistic programming to your marketing and advertising.

    Presented by: Rachel Grossman, Ring Leader, dog&pony dc

  • Blueprint for Public Art and Placemaking: An Introduction to Developing Creative Communities through Art

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/01/2013

    What is creative placemaking? What is public art? How do the two combined create vibrant public spaces that are engaging, often interactive and transform communities? This webinar will provide an introduction to developing enduring, creative places that incorporate retail, street life, and both temporary and permanent public art for all to enjoy.

    What is creative placemaking? What is public art? How do the two combined create vibrant public spaces that are engaging, often interactive and transform communities? This webinar will provide an introduction to developing enduring, creative places that incorporate retail, street life, andboth temporary and permanent public art for all to enjoy. We will discuss the lesson plans of each webinar in the series and the resources and tools participants will learn and apply to creative placemaking and public art projects in their communities. Barbara Goldstein, Principal of Barbara Goldstein & Associates, Creative Placemaking and Public Art Planning and author of Public Art by the Book will lead the webinar series and discussions that will also include guest presenters whose pioneering work has transformed parts of their communities. This is an essential webinar series for people who are tackling the issues of reinforcing and rebuilding communities to accommodate and activate the new creative economy.

    Presented by: Barbara Goldstein, Principal, Barbara Goldstein & Associates; Brett Cook, Artist, Oakland, CA; Greg Peckham, Managing Director, LAND Studio, Cleveland, OH; Liesel Fenner, Public Art Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

  • MAP-21: Opportunities for the Arts and Transportation

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/09/2013

    In this webinar we will hear from art and transportation experts who will review current MAP-21 legislation outlining transportation enhancement funding. Presenters will cover a range of project types that serve as models for implementation in your community.

    In this webinar we will hear from art and transportation experts who will review current MAP-21 legislation outlining transportation enhancement funding. Presenters will cover a range of project types that serve as models for implementation in your community.

    Presented by: Michael Killoren, Director, Local Arts Agencies / Challenge America Fast-Track, National Endowment for the Arts; Lilly Shoup, Policy Analyst, US Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary; Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs, Americans for the Arts; Wendy Feuer, Assistant Commissioner for Urban Design, New York City Department of Transportation

  • Series: Evaluation in Action! 2013

    Contains 5 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/27/2013

    While arts practitioners may never conduct scientific-level evaluations, most do want to understand the links between program activities and outcomes in order to tell powerful stories of impact.

    Part 1: Linking Your Work to Outcomes

    While arts practitioners may never conduct scientific-level evaluations, most do want to understand the links between program activities and outcomes in order to tell powerful stories of impact. Learn some ways that you can connect the dots between arts endeavors and social outcomes through the experiences of Art At Work (AAW), a program in the City of Portland, ME with the ambitious goal of improving municipal government through strategic arts projects with municipal employees, elected officials, and local artists. Art At Work's evaluation story is grounded in the need to make the case for the value of arts toward improving municipal government at a systemic level, including outcomes related to behavior, attitudes, and policy change. This webinar will help you understand: how to develop an evaluation plan based on indicators of importance to different stakeholders, how to organize and make use of multiple sources and types of data; and how to gather key informants' and direct participants' perspectives to help substantiate links between your creative efforts and outcomes.

    Presented by: M. Christine Dwyer, RMC Research; Marty Pottenger, Art At Work

    Recorded:March 28, 2013


    Part 2: Credible Qualitative Design & Analysis

    Anecdotes and qualitative evidence are critical to communicating the transformative effects of arts and culture and giving a full sense of impact of arts for change work. Learn how to collect and analyze qualitative data that's credible. Qualitative information is important for indicating changes in awareness, attitudes, the content and tenor of public dialogue, and in describing the role, nature, and efficacy of aesthetic activity. But it is often considered "soft" evidence. Through multiple evaluation stories by arts practitioners that touch on ethnographic and other qualitative approaches, this webinar illuminates principles to support systematic planning for, and collection and analysis of qualitative data so that findings hold water. You'll learn how to select and prepare credible evaluators and/or observers, methods to summarize and analyze qualitative data such as interview and focus group documentation, dialogue and meeting notes, and dialogues; and how to combine qualitative and quantitative information to communicate concise and compelling results.

    Presented by: M. Christine Dwyer, RMC Research and Amy Kitchener, Executive Director Alliance for California Traditional Arts

    Recorded April 18, 2013


    Part 3: Meaningful Numbers!

    Sometimes numbers convey meaning better than words. Learn what you can and should quantify! Numbers have meaning when they relate to a clear theory of action and when they can be compared to something else. This webinar features the story of Detroit's Mosaic Youth Theatre and a study by the University of Michigan that assessed the effects of Mosaic's model for positive youth development, including individual and social outcomes such as community involvement and increased social capital. Drawing on Mosaic's experience as well as others, you will learn about selecting a sample for data collection, constructing credible surveys related to attitude change, making comparative analyses, and what constitute credible response rates. You'll also get tips on what to do if numbers are small and see examples of compelling data visualization.

    Presented by: M. Christine Dwyer, RMC Research and Rick Sperling, Mosaic Youth Theatre and Lorraine Gutierrez, University of Michigan

    Recorded May 23, 2013


    Part 4: Understanding Long-term & Cumulative Effects

    What difference can 150 artists' projects make for businesses and neighborhoods during a big community disruption? And, how can we identify, substantiate and illuminate that value? This webinar offers strategies to gauge cumulative and longer-term social effects of creative work. Learn ways to track and report the impact of small and multiple projects that add up to real change. Laura Zabel will share how conscientious documentation, media tracking and analysis and network mapping are helping to measure impact and tell the story of Springboard for the Arts' Irrigate initiative along a light rail construction corridor. With some grounding in evaluative thinking and theory, learn how these and other approaches can help capture impact over time. We'll also look back at the Dance Exchange's Shipyard Project in Portsmouth, NH to see how creative work can create conditions that make other outcomes possible. What does looking back after three, five or 15 years teach us about tracking project outcomes now?

    Presented by: M. Christine Dwyer, RMC Research; Laura Zabel, Springboard for the Arts

    Recorded June 27, 2013



  • From Reactionary to Anticipatory: Tips & Tools for (Effective) Local Arts Advocacy

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/21/2013

    Are you and your organization prepared to be an effective arts advocate?

    Are you and your organization prepared to be an effective arts advocate? As funding from local government sources becomes more competitive and less available you will need more tools and expertise to create effective local arts advocacy strategies. In this webinar, you will learn from some of the best arts advocates about how they developed their successful advocacy campaigns.

    Presenters: Ra Joy, Executive Director Arts Alliance Illinois, Danielle Brazelle, Executive Director, Arts for LA, Jay Dick, Senior Director of State and Local Government Affairs, Americans for the Arts.

    Moderator: Theresa Cameron, Americans for the Arts


  • Series: The Evolution of Local Arts Grantmaking

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/20/2013

    Are you thinking about shifting demographics as you plan your grantmaking? Learn about ways to reshape and refocus your grantmaking in this new majority/minority population.

    Part 1: Addressing Shifting Demographics - Equity and Access?

    Are you thinking about shifting demographics as you plan your grantmaking? Learn about ways to reshape and refocus your grantmaking in this new majority/minority population.

    Join Eloise Damrosch, Executive Director of the Portland Regional Arts and Cultural Council (RACC) and Oregon Consultant, Bill Flood as they discuss the new outreach and equity plan for RACC.

    |In 2010, RACC established new goals for reaching out to underserved populations and developed new ways to proactively provide RACC's services in new communities. Learn how RACC is working collaboratively with arts organizations to help identify strategies for increasing access to arts and culture in the city of Portland and throughout the region.


    Recorded January 30, 2013


    Part 2: Technology, Systems, and Capturing Data.

    There are many new and exciting grantmaking technology innovations to help streamline the grantmaking process as well as data collection. What are the latest and greatest and how to assess these. What's right for your organization? How are you using the data once it is collected?

    Recorded February 20, 2013


    Part 3: Leveraging Investments in Creativity – What's Next?

    Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC) was launched in 2003 as a 10-year national initiative to improve support systems for American artists. By design, the program sunsets this year. Hear from current LINC grantees about best practices and innovations in local artists support.

    Recorded March 20, 2013

  • New Responses to Old Complaints: Addressing Changing Customer Expectations Using New and Old Technologies

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/12/2013

    Remember the days when all your ticket buyers called you when they wanted tickets? Remember when you had to pick up the phone to call them when you wanted something? Many subscribers and ticket buyers still respond to this traditional model but many of your website visitors and those aware of your organization's presence on social media have different expectations. Some of them buy and some of them don't. Learn from some real-life customer service challenges and nightmares and how you can use some new (and some old) technologies to holistically respond to these differing expectations.

    Remember the days when all your ticket buyers called you when they wanted tickets? Remember when you had to pick up the phone to call them when you wanted something? Many subscribers and ticket buyers still respond to this traditional model but many of your website visitors and those aware of your organization's presence on social media have different expectations. Some of them buy and some of them don't. Learn from some real-life customer service challenges and nightmares and how you can use some new (and some old) technologies to holistically respond to these differing expectations.

    Presented by: Joseph Yoshitomi, Marketing Director, Geffen Playhouse, Los Angeles, CA


    This webinar is presented in partnership with the Arts & Business Council of New York and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • A Look at the Future of Dynamic Pricing

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/04/2013

    Recent studies argue that there are too many venues and arts organizations are struggling with capitalization. All of this, plus other bottom-line issues, puts more pressure on earned income. Many arts organizations have begun to use dynamic pricing to help boost earned income, but it is often a blunt instrument. We will discuss best practices in dynamic pricing that go into deeper analysis, show how small changes can bring large gains, and how outside influences such as consumer psychology, management of the customer experience, internal and external communications, and price elasticity all play a part in sophisticated, successful dynamic pricing strategies.

    Recent studies argue that there are too many venues and arts organizations are struggling with capitalization. All of this, plus other bottom-line issues, puts more pressure on earned income. Many arts organizations have begun to use dynamic pricing to help boost earned income, but it is often a blunt instrument. We will discuss best practices in dynamic pricing that go into deeper analysis, show how small changes can bring large gains, and how outside influences such as consumer psychology, management of the customer experience, internal and external communications, and price elasticity all play a part in sophisticated, successful dynamic pricing strategies.

    Presented by: Steven Roth, President, The Pricing Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Jenifer Thomas, Consultant, The Pricing Institute.



    This webinar is presented in partnership with the Arts & Business Council of New York and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

  • Series: Understanding Arts Education Constituents' Roles

    Contains 7 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/15/2012

    Seven part series on Arts Education Constituents and their roles.

    Part 1: Understanding Federal Constituents in Arts Education

    Just how much power do federal constituents wield in the ecosystem of arts education? Learn how to create and leverage relationships from the White House to the US Dept of Education, and learn why you should be inviting your member of Congress to your next event!

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presenters: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Heather Noonan, Vice President for Advocacy, League of American Orchestras

    Moderated by: Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded:Thursday, January 26, 2012


    Part 2: Understanding State-Level Constituents in Arts Education

    States wield an enormous amount of power in education through both legislation and funding. Learn how your organization can better partner with your state's arts council, advocacy groups, and Department of Education, to the benefit of arts learning.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presented by: Joe Landon, Executive Director, California Alliance for Arts Education; Jordan Crosby, Director of Arts and Education Initiative, The Education Policy and Leadership Center.

    Moderated by: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded: Thursday, February 23, 2012


    Part 3: Understanding School Boards' Role in Arts Education

    School boards often provide infrastructure support for arts education. They review, revise, and adopt superintendents' proposed budgets, policy, and arts education curriculum. Learn more about how they can be a primary audience for advocacy efforts through this webinar and explore examples of interactions with school boards from two cities.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presented by: Abe Flores, Advocacy Field Manager, Arts for LA; Kanisha R. Williams-Jones, Director, Educational Services and Caucus Liaison, National School Boards Association

    Moderated by: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded: Thursday, March 22, 2012


    Part 4: Understanding Superintendents' Role in Arts Education

    Superintendents can play a crucial role in arts education. They propose budgets; provide district wide training (including professional development for teachers and leadership training for principals); hire and empower curriculum directors (including district arts coordinators); and can ensure the arts are included in district planning. This webinar will share a case study about 5 different district leaders, and help you learn the importance of the superintendent position within the field of arts education.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presenter: Talia Gibas, Associate Manager, Arts for All, Los Angeles County Arts Commission

    Moderated by: Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts; Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded: Thursday, May 24, 2012



    Part 5: Understanding Business Partnerships for Arts Education

    Business leaders can be key advocates for arts education. They can champion arts education by offering internships, mobilizing resources, and raising visibility and can also be effective advocates with elected officials because of their role as a driver of the local economy. With this much local clout, you can't afford to pass up partnerships with local businesses. This webinar can help you learn how to move local businesses from single event sponsors to more fully engaged educational stakeholders within your community.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presented by: Jim Herr, Senior Manager, Global Corporate Citizenship, Boeing; Gayle Villani, Vice President, Programs, PENCIL

    Moderated by: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded: Thursday, July 26, 2012



    Part 6: Understanding Principals' Role in Arts Education

    We may be conditioned to think that going to the Principal's office is a bad thing, but it's high time you paid your local Principals a visit. They are critical partners to ensure better arts education in schools. Principals create a school vision; provide leadership and support, and set schedules, budgets and other priorities which can ensure that the arts get the same attention as other academic subjects. Join this webinar to learn from our expert presenters how you can start or grow your relationship with a school's instructional leader.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presented by: Una McAlinden, Executive Director, ArtsEd Washington; Doug Poage, principal, Parkwood Elementary; Laura Ploudre, former principal at Parkwood Elementary

    Moderated by: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    Recorded: Thursday, September 27, 2012


    Part 7: Understanding Parents' Role in Arts Education

    Art education and advocacy starts at home. A parent's strongest role supporting arts education should be as a local advocate. Parents levy expectations onto school boards and their child's principal and teachers, which can translate into a better environment for arts education. This kind of parental advocacy takes the form of votes, public opinion, volunteerism, fundraising and donations. Participate in this webinar to learn from our panel of experts how you can involve parents in your programs.

    This webinar is one of a seven part series as Americans for the Arts rolls out a toolkit, The Arts Education Field Guide, which will illuminate ways to navigate the complex web of citizens, policy-makers, government entities, and organizations that influence arts education from the school house to the White House and from the living room to the board room.

    Presenters: Doug Israel, Director of Research and Policy, The Center for Arts Education

    Moderated by: Narric Rome, Senior Director of Federal Affairs and Arts Education, Americans for the Arts; Kristen Engebretsen, Arts Education Program Coordinator, Americans for the Arts;

    Recorded: Thursday, November 15, 2012



  • Award Winning Arts and Business Partnerships (The pARTnership Movement series 2012)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/14/2012

    Each year the BCA 10 honors ten businesses that have been exceptional partners with the arts organizations in their communities.

    Each year the BCA 10 honors ten businesses that have been exceptional partners with the arts organizations in their communities. These companies set the standard of excellence and serve as role models for other businesses to follow. Hear directly from the 2012 honorees about how they support the arts and learn how to create successful partnerships with the businesses in your community.