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  • Starter Kit: Public Art in Private Development

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/15/2014

    Are you thinking of instituting a private development policy? Interested in learning more about what has worked for other programs?

    Are you thinking of instituting a private development policy? Interested in learning more about what has worked for other programs? This 60-minute webinar will cover some of the basics of how to develop and institute a public art for private development requirement in your community. Hear from experts in the field on what to consider, how to recognize when the time is right for implementation and what resources are available for researching other communities' polices and ordinances. Learn about the challenges and successes of other public art programs and what they discovered along the way. This webinar is geared towards administrators, community partners and those advising developers and artists who want to know more about the process of establishing requirements for public art for private developers.

    Presenters:

    Sarah Conley Odenkirk, Attorney, The Law Office of Sarah Conley Odenkirk (Moderator)
    Elise DeMarzo, Public Art Program Manager, City of Palo Alto
    Gail Goldman, Principal, Gail M. Goldman Associates, LLC

    #StartPrivateArt

  • Arts Education: A Shared Responsibility

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/17/2014

    Is our goal to advocate for arts education that is only or primarily taught by certified educators? Or, is a mix of instruction by arts specialists, teaching artists, and general classroom teachers truly best?

    Arts education is a unique model within the United States' education system, in that arts learning is truly provided by a myriad of stakeholders—certified teachers, parents, afterschool programs, community centers, etc. Sometimes this happens in a well-orchestrated manner. Sometimes these relationships are fraught with strife, such as making a decision to spend money on a certified arts instructor versus a community-based program that would serve more students but on a less frequent basis.

    Is our goal to advocate for arts education that is only or primarily taught by certified educators? Or, is a mix of instruction by arts specialists, teaching artists, and general classroom teachers truly best? How can our field lead the way in education reform as we look at a framework of shared delivery and shared leadership for instruction in our content area? As technology continues to rapidly change, and budgets continue to decline, this model of shared responsibility might just be the wave of the future in all of education.

    First, learn about the theory and the history of the Shared Endeavor philosophy. Second, learn from a panel of experts in shared delivery of arts education in their communities from across America. And third, hear from an arts advocate who used this model to advocate for continued quality arts education in her community!

    Speakers:

    Talia Gibas: Manager, Arts For All LA County Arts Commission

    Deborah E. Mikula: Executive Director, Arts Council of Greater Lansing

    Jennifer Oliver: Interim Executive Director, Young Audiences of San Diego

    Rosalind Flynn: Educational Drama Specialist, Head of the M.A. Theatre Education at Catholic University of America

    Mary Ruth McGinn: 3rd Grade Teacher, Stedwick Elementary School, Montgomery County, Maryland

  • Series: Placemaking & Cultural Districts

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/12/2014

    Three part series on community building, tools, placemaking and cultural districts

    Part 1: Cultural Districts as Creative Community Building & Placemaking Tools

    This webinar will highlight how cultural districts are used as creative community building and placemaking tools. Tom Borrup will be our guest presenter. Tom is a cultural planner and long time leader in community based arts as director of Intermedia Arts in Minneapolis. He is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Leadership and Change at Antioch University researching the role of social and organizational networks in the planning and management of cultural districts.

    Recorded May 21, 2014


    Part 2: Naturally Occurring Cultural Districts New York

    This webinar will focus on a new report commissioned by Naturally Occurring Cultural Districts New York (NOCD-NY) Innovative Cultural Uses of Urban Space: A Profile Series. The report is a collection of seven profiles that highlight creative uses of space including adaptive refuse, construction zones and vacant lots, public outdoor space, publically owned facilities, religious spaces, and shared space.

    NOCD-NY is a citywide alliance of artists, activists, creative manufacturers, and policy makers committed to revitalizing New York City "from the neighborhood up."

    Presented by: Caron Atlas, co-director of NOCD-NY and director of Arts & Democracy who teaches at Pratt Institute's Programs for Sustainable Planning and Development;Tamara Greenfield, co-director of NOCD-NY and director of Fourth Arts Block; and Lynn Stern, who wrote the report's executive summary.

    Recorded May 22, 2014


    Part 3: The Cultural Trail in Indianapolis

    This webinar will explore the Cultural Trail in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Cultural Trail is an 8-mile world class urban bike and pedestrian path in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana that connects neighborhoods, cultural districts and entertainment amenities while serving as the downtown hub for central Indiana's vast greenway system. The webinar will focus on ways that public art is being used as the "glue that binds" these cultural districts and neighborhoods into one trail.

    May 23, 2014

  • Act Globally--Thrive Locally

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/06/2014

    Learn how local arts agencies and their partners are working creatively across borders to build bridges internationally while serving their communities locally.

    Artist and Cultural Exchanges are a long-term and proven strategy for improving relations between countries, communities and their peoples. Local Arts Agencies historically have supported, funded and developed successful cultural exchange programs. But cultural diplomacy is one side of the global engagement coin. Learn how local arts agencies and their partners are working creatively across borders to build bridges internationally while serving their communities locally—through employing economic development strategies such as expanding markets, encouraging trade, and fostering international cultural tourism.


    Presenters:

    Mary Hammond, Executive Director
    Robin Malpass, Marketing Consultant
    Paducah Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB), Paducah, KY
    @PaducahCVB

    Tom Bensen, Executive Director
    Missoula Cultural Council, Missoula, MT
    @missoulaculture

  • Arts pARTnerships Where You Don't Expect It

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/23/2014

    The arts have always had the power to excite people, but how can we tap into the arena of avid sports spectators to increase that energy even more?

    The arts have always had the power to excite people, but how can we tap into the arena of avid sports spectators to increase that energy even more? pARTnerships can happen in places where we least expect it, and collaborations with the sports world are ones that might not come to mind right away, but they can also produce excellent rewards. Learn from two examples of how the arts world has merged with sports: Margy Waller of Art on the Streets will join artist Pam Kravetz in a discussion of how they incorporated art into Cincinnati's Flying Pig Marathon; and ArtsWave's Rebecca Bromels will walk us through how they formed a great working relationship with a nationally franchised sports team-the Cincinnati Reds-through their Art Pass program, Art in the Park days, and more.


    Presenters:

    Margy Waller, Art on the Streets

    Pam Kravetz, Cincinnati-based artist

    Rebecca Bromels, Communications Director at ArtsWave

  • Engaging Audiences in the Mobile Space

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In this webinar, you will hear how organizations have used mobile in innovative (and in some cases, free!) ways.

    There's no question that the capabilities and usage of mobile devices continue to rise as technology advances. Mobile devices are surpassing desktop computers as the primary tool for accessing the web. That means new and existing audiences are using mobile devices to search for your organization, access information about it, and even purchase tickets. If your arts organization has yet to embrace mobile, you'll soon be left behind.

    As more arts organizations adopt new forms of technology to engage audiences, you must evaluate your own organization's (and audience's) mobile needs and act on them. In this webinar, you will hear how organizations have used mobile in innovative (and in some cases, free!) ways.

    Presented by: Amelia Northrup-Simpson, Strategic Communications Specialist, TRG Arts, Colorado Springs, CO

  • Public Art/Street Art

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/02/2014

    Why has street art has become more socially accepted? How has it developed into coordinated public art programs?

    Public art always had a broad definition, but how does street art fit into this field? Recently, more and more cities and towns have been embracing street art as a community-based initiative in an effort to develop a visual voice for their neighborhoods or districts. Public art programs have begun to develop around or support these community-based forms of expression. In this 60-minute webinar you will learn why street art has become more socially accepted and how in some areas it has developed into coordinated public art programs. This webinar is for public art administrators, community leaders, artists and others who are working in the community arts-sphere.

    Presenters:

    Vikki Tobak, Public Art Consultant (Moderator)
    Monica Campana, Co-Founder & Executive Director, Living Walls
    Ben Stone, Executive Director, Station North Arts & Entertainment, Inc.

    #streetart

  • Series: Evaluation in Action! 2014

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/28/2014

    Assessing Social Impact, Collecting Evidence, and Art-Based Evaluation Methods.

    Part 1: Assessing Social Impact: Practical Insights from Tucson

    What has the Tucson Pima Arts Council (TPAC) learned through four studies and three reports on its PLACE Initiative? Nationally recognized, PLACE (People, Land, Arts, Culture, and Engagement), has supported individuals and organizations who implement arts-based civic engagement projects that address critical community issues in the southwest. Learn about what kind of framework cultural workers are creating to assess work that engages community constituents as essential collaborators, and "place makers", not solely as audience members.

    Presented by: Leia Maahs, Grants and Community Cultural Development Manager, Tucson Pima Arts Council; Roberto Bedoya, Executive Director, Tucson Pima Arts Council; Maria Rosario Jackson, Research Advisor; Dr. James Roebuck. Co-Director of ERAD, University of Arizona

    Recorded April 2, 2014


    Part 2: Collecting Evidence of Outcomes and Impact

    To capture what you need to know, you need to know what to look for! Indicators are evidence of specific changes that can be seen, heard or read to show progress on or demonstrate that an outcome is being met. Indicators are key to know what to measure and what data to collect. This webinar walks you through two ways to zoom in on indicators and then collect relevant data for creative change projects. The featured project is the Worcester (MA) Wayfinding Project, planned as a Creative System for Understanding and Navigating Worcester including signage, destination identifiers, public art, and information kiosks capable of guiding Worcester visitors to their destinations. In a lively real-time exercise, Arnold Aprill will guide Erin Williams in creating a rubric that specifies levels of change around such project outcomes as increasing community spirit, developing awareness of history, or others. Barbara Schaffer Bacon and Pam Korza will drill down into Animating Democracy's Continuum of Impact to show how it can help specify outcomes and indicators. Both presentations point to doable data collection strategies!

    Presented by: Arnold Aprill, founder, Radical Compliance Arts and Learning Laboratory and Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE); Erin Williams, cultural development officer, City of Worcester (MA); Barbara Schaffer Bacon and Pam Korza, co-directors, Animating

    Recorded May 7, 2014


    Part 3: Art-Based Evaluation Methods

    Don't leave your creativity at the evaluation door. Story, poetry, mapping, movement... these and more creative expressions are the work of art but can also elicit information and data useful to assessment and evaluation. This webinar looks at ways to integrate creativity and art making into all stages of evaluation process, from being a method of data collection to a means for sharing findings that make intangible outcomes visible and meaningful.

    Presented by: Alissa Schwartz, PhD, Founder and Principal at Solid Fire Consulting; Rita Fierro, Principal Consultant at Fierro Consulting, LLC; Barbara Schaffer Bacon and Pam Korza, Co-Directors of Animating Democracy, a program of Americans for the Arts

    Recorded May 28, 2014

  • Series: Board Training

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Board Training 101, Assessing Your Board, and On-Boarding Young and Diverse Board Members and then Engaging Them

    Part 1: Board Training 101

    Board Training Week kicks off with the basics: Board Building 101 brings practical tips and advice from Kristen Romans, Director of Programs, Board Services & Training at the Arts & Business Council of Chicago. Leading a presentation that has proven successful in her community, Romans will lead attendees through the crucial steps that need to be taken to ensure a productive search and placement process for a Board of Directors. Learn what systems and practices your organization needs to implement to launch a formal board recruitment plan, including "must have's", templates for recruitment packets, and tips on how to determine what types of board members your organization really needs and how to get them.

    Presented by: Kristen Romans, Director of Programs, Board Services & Training at the Arts & Business Council of Chicago

    Recorded May 21, 2014


    Part 2: Assessing Your Board

    Learn how to create a more dynamic and effective board through board assessment and evaluation. This webinar will be led by Gigi Antoni who is CEO of Big Thought in Dallas, Texas. Ms. Antoni will help you learn how Big Thought works with its board of directors to develop assessment tools to help strengthen board members' role as an executive leader in their organization and community.

    Presented by: Gigi Antoni, President and CEO of Big Thought in Dallas, TX

    Recorded May 22, 2014


    Part 3: On-Boarding Young and Diverse Board Members and then Engaging Them

    Are you struggling to attract young members and volunteers that are reflective of your surrounding community and constituency? Join us for a case study with Fund for the Arts' Barbara Sexton Smith, who will discuss the NeXt! Leadership Development Program. NeXt! works with businesses in Louisville, Kentucky to engage young professionals with the goal of preparing the next generation of volunteer leaders in the arts and cultural sector, with a focus on strong corporate citizenship. Sexton Smith will be joined by Andrea Strange, a former participant of the NeXt! program and the current President of the Louisville Youth Choir's Board of Directors. Strange also serves as the Manager in the Accounting and Auditing Department at Harding, Shymanski & Company, P.S.C.

    Presented by: Barbara Sexton Smith, President & CEO of Fund for the Arts; Andrea Strange, President of Louisville Youth Choir's Board of Directors

    Recorded May 23, 2014

  • Series: Business Speak: Can We Talk?

    Contains 7 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/23/2014

    Partnering with the business community no longer means just asking for money. Learn how to effectively talk to business leaders, marketing departments, human resource personnel and other decision makers within the business environment about how to develop mutually beneficial projects.


    Part 1: Business Speak - Can We Talk?

    Partnering with the business community no longer means just asking for money. Learn how to effectively talk to business leaders, marketing departments, human resource personnel and other decision makers within the business environment about how to develop mutually beneficial projects.

    This webinar is presented in partnership with the Arts & Business Council of New York and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature."

    Recorded February 21, 2013


    Part 2: Strategies on How to Build and Fund Successful Volunteer Programs

    Businesses often promote volunteerism as one of the key elements of employee engagement and arts organizations are looking for ways to increase involvement with skilled volunteers. Learn practical strategies on how to build and fund a successful volunteer program in your community.

    Presented by: Eileen Cunnife, Director of Business Volunteers for the Arts and Business on Board, Arts & Business Council of Philadelphia (Moderator); Susan Myers, Associate Director, Business for Culture and the Arts; Megan Low, Director of Services, Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston.

    This webinar is presented in partnership with the Arts & Business Council of New York and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

    Recorded April 25, 2013


    Part 3: Trends in Business Support for the Arts

    Learn trends in business support for the arts from our newly released 2013 BCA Triennial Survey of Business Support for the Arts. This study explores how and why small, midsize and large businesses partner with the arts. Experts in corporate giving will discuss how these trends fit into the current landscape and how you can leverage this information. Presented by: Mark Shugoll, Chief Executive Officer, Shugoll Research; Michael Stroik, Senior Research Analyst, Research and Measurement, CECP

    Moderator: Maud Lyon, Executive Director CultureSource

    Recorded July 18, 2013


    Part 4: Meet the Real Shakespeare of Litigation

    The real Shakespeares of Litigation, Coltranes of Chemistry and Picassos of Accounting will discuss how arts education, arts programs at the workplace and their own participation in an art form have enhanced their work. Learn from business people in different industries about how partnerships with the arts makes business sense.

    Panelists: Michael Stolberg, Lawing Financial; Patrice Tanaka, Co-Chair, Chief Creative Officer at CRT/tanaka; Donald Brinkman, manager of external programs in digital humanities, digital heritage and games for learning at Microsoft Research.

    Moderator: Kelly Pollock, Executive Director, COCRecorded


    Recorded September 19, 2013


    Part 5: 2013 BCA 10 Case Studies

    Each year the BCA 10 honors ten businesses that have been exceptional partners with the arts. These companies set the standard of excellence and serve as role models for other businesses to follow. Hear directly from 2013 honorees about why they partner with the arts and learn how to create successful partnerships with the businesses in your community.

    Americans for the Arts thanks Aetna for its generous support of this program.

    Recorded November 21, 2013


    Part 6: Engaging Business Advocates

    Engaging your community's business and philanthropic leaders as arts advocates and advisors is a goal many arts organizations aspire to but don't always accomplish. Learn by example with a case study from Dan Bowers, President of ArtsBuild in Chattanooga, who recently spearheaded the creation of a community-wide cultural plan with input from local artists and business leaders. Hear from the two community advocates-artist and Lyndhurst Foundation program officer, Karen "Rudy" Rudolph and ArtsBuild board member and Vice President of Global Programs at Unum, Cissy Williams-who each played a role in the plan's development and are actively involved in its implementation today.


    The second half of the webinar will bring us John Bryan, President of CultureWorks in Richmond, Virginia. CultureWorks was formed in 2009 through a recommendation by the Richmond Region Cultural Action Plan, a process that engaged leaders from the cultural and business worlds, as well as members of the community. In addition to its support of arts non-profits, CultureWorks collaborates with local businesses and other sectors to spur the economic development of the greater Richmond area.

    These case studies will give you the building blocks to engage business and community leaders outside of the funding realm through practical (and successful) examples from local communities around the country.


    Presented by: Dan Bowers, President, ArtsBuild; Karen "Rudy" Rudolph, Artist & Program Officer, Lyndhurst Foundation; Cissy Williams, Board Member, ArtsBuild & Vice President of Global Programs, Unum; John Bryan, President, CultureWorks