2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package (On-Demand)

The 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference was always going to be about convergence, the bridging of different communities, and the role of the arts in healing—and this is more pressing now than ever. The 2020 convening is our time to gather as an arts field to better understand this crisis, how we are responding to it, and how we will move toward recovery. 
This package includes all three days of programming.


Tuesday, June 23 - Thursday, June 25, 2020
 

Includes: 

• Access to Field Experts in Public Art, Equity, Arts Education, Arts Management, and Advocacy. 

• Featured sessions with New York magazine critic Helen Shaw; United States Artists CEO Deana Haggag; sound artist Yoko Sen; musician and disability advocate Molly Joyce; and the National Gallery of Art Director Kaywin Feldman

• Interaction with exhibitors including: Artists Thrive, Goucher College MA in Arts Administration, Performing Arts Readiness, SmartSimple, SMU DataArts, and WESTAF - Western States Arts Federation. 

• And More!

Come back soon for the full event agenda!


BEFORE YOU REGISTER:

You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event. Please see the below “How To Register” section for more details on registering. 


Become a professional member of Americans for the Arts before you register and save on registration fees!   
Members at the $75 level or higher save on one-day and full conference rates. Plus, your membership includes a year of connections with 7,000 arts leaders across the country and access to member-exclusive tools and resources, including more digital learning opportunities on ArtsU! 


The Full List of Membership Benefits

ALREADY A MEMBER?
How to access your membership discounts:
1. Log in to AmericansfortheArts.org to confirm your membership status.
2. Head over to ArtsU. Your membership benefits will now be applied to any purchases you make.
3. Then, pick the registration option of your choice!


WANT TO BECOME A MEMBER?
You can become a member online or call us at 202.371.2830. Become a member before you register to take advantage of the discounts!

PROFESSIONAL MEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $75


In order to take advantage of the member rate, you must purchase a membership PRIOR to registering for the event. If membership is purchased after registering for the event, we will not be able to adjust registration rates retroactively.

NONMEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $125


HOW TO REGISTER:

To register for the full on-demand event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart. You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out.
If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.

By registering for this package, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.


HOW TO ACCESS ON-DEMAND CONTENT:
  1. Visit the event agenda page to select your desired session for viewing. 
  2. Select your desired session from the agenda list and click the red VIEW SESSION button.
  3. Once on the desired session page, locate the box on the right hand side with the title of the session.
  4. Click on the box.
  5. Click the red VIEW ARCHIVED RECORDING button - The session will automatically start playing in a new browser window.

Should you need any assistance accessing the recording, please refer to our visual instructions on our "ArtsU Tech Support Page", or send us an email at events@artsusa.org.


DONATE NOW:

Americans for the Arts is committed to providing training and resources to support the arts and culture field, right now and through the long road of recovery ahead. If you are able, please consider making a donation today to sustain that work.

  • KEYNOTE: The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy (On-Demand)

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Presented by Americans for the Arts, the Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy is a leading national forum for arts policy intended to stimulate dialogue on policy and social issues affecting the arts. The annual lecture is named for Nancy Hanks, former president of Americans for the Arts and chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, who devoted 15 years of her professional life to bringing the arts to prominent national consciousness.

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    Please note: 

    The live viewing for the 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy has already occurred. You may still register for the event to have access to the recorded content. 

    The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy was presented live as the opening keynote presentation of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 at 11:30 AM EDT.  Delivering this year's lecture virtually will be Vijay Gupta, renown citizen artist, social justice advocate, acclaimed violinist, 2018 MacArthur Fellow, and Americans for the Arts board member. You can view this thought-provoking and artistic event free by either registering here on this page for just the lecture or registering for the entire Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference, where the lecture is included in your paid registration.


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    Lecturer's Bio

    Vijay Gupta believes that the work of the artist and the work of citizenship is the same: to create the world we want to see in our small, everyday actions—one person, one relationship, and one note at a time.

     Hailed as “one of the most radical thinkers in the unradical world of American classical music,” Mr. Gupta is an esteemed violinist and speaker. Mr. Gupta’s labor of love lies in the founding and directing of Street Symphony, which brings music to people in shelters, clinics, county jails and prisons. Mr. Gupta’s work serves to engage people across vast social and economic differences—people who would often never be in the same room together—to create new transformative conversations about belonging and citizenship. Mr. Gupta’s work brings beauty, respite, and purpose to those all too often ignored by society, while encouraging us to reflect on many ways we can all make a difference and truly be citizens in our world today.

     We all have a story that matters. Mr. Gupta’s story began just north of New York City in 1987, where he was born to Indian immigrants who immersed him equally in the cultures of West Bengal and Western Europe. Mr. Gupta began playing the violin at a young age, and after only three years of study, auditioned for the Juilliard School of Music Pre-College program. He played his solo debut under the baton of Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, and as a teenager, toured the U.S., Europe, Japan, and his Indian motherland as a soloist and recitalist. As an undergraduate, he continued to study violin performance while also following a course of study in biology, which led him to research internships at City University of New York and the Harvard Institutes of Medicine where, ironically, he received the most encouragement and support to make a life not as a researcher or doctor, but as a musician. Mr. Gupta continued his musical training at the Yale School of Music before taking an audition for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra where, in 2007, he became the youngest violinist to win a position in the orchestra’s history. 

     Soon after joining the orchestra, Mr. Gupta discovered that his new hometown was the epicenter of the crisis of homelessness in America today. Even in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis today, thousands of Angelenos sleep on the streets, and even more are incarcerated in the largest county jail system on the planet—effectively our world’s largest psychiatric facility. In 2010, Mr. Gupta started organizing musical events for audiences he would never meet in Walt Disney Concert Hall, performing classical chamber music with his colleagues across the city at homeless shelters, mental health clinics, hospitals and Veterans centers, Los Angeles county jails and California state prisons—and even the very streets of Skid Row. 

     As a grassroots movement of music, the musical offerings of Street Symphony encompass not only the world of classical and choral music, but the traditions of Mariachi, Jazz, West-African drumming, Romani music, folk songs, and most importantly, musical offerings from and by the community of Skid Row—music from people who have themselves experienced homelessness and incarceration. In this radical model of hospitality and exchange, the musicians of Street Symphony share their gifts, and their stage, with the community they serve. They learn and grow with each other. Mr. Gupta says that often, the professionals are the ones who walk away with the greater gift.

     Mr. Gupta is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a 2017 Citizen Artist Fellowship from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and a 2018 MacArthur Fellowship. (Each day, Mr. Gupta shares a musical meditation on Instagram centered on the music of Bach, and he encourages you to all follow along @Gupta_violin).  

    Introductory Remarks
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    Nancy Pelosi is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Ms. Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years.

    As Speaker Ms. Pelosi is fighting for the people, working to lower health care costs, increase workers’ pay through strong economic growth and rebuilding America, and clean up corruption to make Washington work for all.

    Thanks to Our Sponsors

    Special thanks to The Rosenthal Family Foundation (Jamie Rosenthal Wolf, Rick Rosenthal, and Nancy Stephens) and Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck for their generous support of this keynote.


    HOW TO REGISTER:

    To register for this event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart.

    You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.  

    By registering for this event, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.


  • Breaking Down Structual Racism in Grantmaking

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Racism is baked into the structure and model of foundation giving—including that of local, county, and state arts agencies. In moments of crisis, even strong pushes towards equity have the potential to be set aside in favor of moving quickly—and we have to resist the idea that speed and equity are an either/or proposition. In this session, participants will briefly learn the history behind the funding structures we have today, hear about session leaders experiences or aspirations in restructuring their general operating support programs, share their own experiences, and then be led through an exercise to get in the shoes of your community members.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    12:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Racism is baked into the structure and model of foundation giving—including that of local, county, and state arts agencies. In moments of crisis, even strong pushes towards equity have the potential to be set aside in favor of moving quickly—and we have to resist the idea that speed and equity are an either/or proposition. In this session, participants will briefly learn the history behind the funding structures we have today, hear about session leaders experiences or aspirations in restructuring their general operating support programs, share their own experiences, and then be led through an exercise to get in the shoes of your community members.

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn the history behind the funding structures we have today.
    • Hear from session leaders (and one another) on their experiences or aspirations in restructuring their general operating support programs in their communities. 
    • Learn about the barriers to change and how you might effectively negotiate these barriers with grantees, community members, and others. 
    Speakers 

    Deidre Thomas, Houston Arts Alliance
    Kathy Hsieh, City of Seattle Office of Arts and Culture
    Jaren Bonilo, San Francisco Arts Commission 


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Jaren Bonilo

    Senior Program Officer, San Francisco Arts Commission

    Jaren Bonillo is the Senior Program Officer at the San Francisco Arts Commission providing leadership in grant-making strategy, cultural equity and community arts investments through the distribution of approximately eleven million dollars annually to nonprofit arts organizations and individual artists. 


    As a grantmaker, nonprofit director, and artist, Ms. Bonillo has over 15 years of experience in the arts and culture field. Prior to joining the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC), she oversaw the California Arts Council’s (CAC) state-wide general operating grant programs, the State-Local Partnership program, and the Statewide and Regional Networks grant, as well as the Professional and Organizational Development grant programs. She also served on the CAC’s Equity Committee and co-led the CAC’s participation in the Government Alliance for Racial Equity (GARE) Capitol Cohort. 


    She holds an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BFA from Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University.

    Deidre Thomas

    Director of Grants, Houston Arts Alliance

    In her role at HAA, Deidre’s portfolio includes oversight of five, city-funded grants programs that drive cultural programming throughout Houston. Her team focuses on continuous improvement, a culture of listening and learning, increased transparency, and philanthropic equity. She works closely with the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs to develop and implement strategy, policies, processes, and special initiatives to support, shape, serve, and lead the cultural landscape in the nation’s most diverse city.  

     

    Deidre served a 3-year term on AFTA’s Emerging Leaders Council & was awarded a fellowship with the Culture Lab Library, a project of Alan Brown of WolfBrown, to curate a collection of literature and other media responding to inequity in cultural funding. Her panel service includes the 2018 Cuyahoga Arts & Culture Project, 2018 Project Row Houses and Center for Art and Social Engagement Fellowship, and Fresh Arts’ 2020 Artists Inc.. 

     

    Deidre holds a B.S. from University of Houston in Sociology with a minor in African American Studies, and a certificate in Nonprofit Management from the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance program (formerly American Humanics). She currently serves as an advisory board member for Robin’s House Family Foundation and as board member for G.R.A.E. (Growing Real Alternatives Everywhere), youth and social justice organizations respectively. 

    Kathy Hsieh

    Cultural Partnerships and Grants Manager, City of Seattle Office of Arts and Culture

    Kathy Hsieh is the Cultural Partnerships & Grants Manager for the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture. A change agent in transforming the Office’s community engagement and arts funding practices through a racial equity lens, she helped the agency earn Seattle Management Association’s first Race & Social Justice Management Award through her work developing innovative funding strategies that center the expertise and experience of communities of color. She leads the Office’s grantmaking team and manages the team’s organizational support programs. She is frequently invited to share her expertise with arts funders throughout the United States and Canada and has been involved with a racial equity learning cohort of Arts funders that developed RE-Tool: Racial Equity in the Panel Process, a collaboratively designed resource for grantmakers to address racial equity in the panel process. She has served on advisory committees, boards, or panels for many community groups including People of Color in Philanthropy and Theatre Puget Sound and has been honored as Verizon’s Asian Pacific American Bash’s Innovator Award in 2012, is the 2015 International Examiner Community Voice Awardee in the Arts, received the Gregory Award for Sustained Achievement in 2017, and the Seattle Chinese American Citizens Alliance’s 2019 Fred Yee Citizens Award.

  • Using Arts and Culture to Create Healthy Open Spaces During Recovery

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    How can arts and culture can help us redefine open spaces as people are social distancing during a public health crisis? During this session, attendees will consider ways that the arts and artists are helping address issues of how spaces are designed and encouraging users to stay separated as we emerge for shelter-in-place orders.  

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    2:15 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    How can arts and culture can help us redefine open spaces as people are social distancing during a public health crisis? During this session, attendees will consider ways that the arts and artists are helping address issues of how spaces are designed and encouraging users to stay separated as we emerge for shelter-in-place orders.  



    Speakers 

    Miguel Vazquez, Planner
    Brittany Delany, Creative Professional, Dancer/Choreographer

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Brittany Delany

    Creative Professional, Dancer/Choreographer

    Brittany Delany is a creative professional and dancer/choreographer based in Los Angeles, California. She earned a B.A. in French Studies and a B.A. in Dance: Choreography & Performance from Wesleyan University. With over a decade of experience working for arts and culture organizations in the USA, she values the power of imagination and teamwork.

    Miguel A. Vazquez

    Planner

    Miguel A. Vazquez, AICP is a planner working at the intersection of urban planning and public health.  Diversity, inclusion and equity are the foundation of his ethos and praxis. Curiosity, creativity and innovation are his preferred conduits to educate, persuade and empower.  Presently, Miguel is the Healthy Communities Planner for the Riverside University Health System-Public Health and serves as Chair of the American Planning Association’s Arts in Planning Interest Group.

     

  • The Top 10 Talking Points You Need to Center the Arts in Recovery

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    As cities face historic budget shortfalls in the wake of COVID-19, local arts agencies are increasingly under threat. This lively session will fill your arts advocacy quiver with 10 case-making arrows to ensure a vital presence for your arts agency.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    12:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    As cities face historic budget shortfalls in the wake of COVID-19, local arts agencies are increasingly under threat. This lively session will fill your arts advocacy quiver with 10 case-making arrows to ensure a vital presence for your arts agency. 

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn the top arguments for keeping arts funding in place in this moment of crisis. 
    • Get a chance to dig into the data and understand why it works for talking to decisionmakers.
    • Connect arts and culture to the most pressing and relevant community needs.
    Speakers

    Randy Cohen, Americans for the Arts


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Randy Cohen

    Vice President of Research, Americans for the Arts

    Randy Cohen is Vice President of Research at Americans for the Arts—the national advocacy organization for the arts—where he has been empowering arts advocates since 1991. Randy stands out as a noted expert in the field of arts funding, research, and using the arts to address community development issues. He publishes Americans Speak Out About the Arts, the nation’s largest public opinion study about the arts, and produces the two premier economic studies of the arts—Arts & Economic Prosperity, the national economic impact study of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences; and Creative Industries, a mapping study of the nation’s 675,000 arts businesses and their employees. His 10 Reasons to Support the Arts blog received the Gold Award from the Association of Media & Publishing—their top honor for best blog post of the year. Randy led the development of The National Arts Index, the annual measure of the health and vitality of arts in the U.S. and the National Arts Policy Roundtable, an annual convening of leaders who focus on the advancement of American culture—launched in partnership with Robert Redford and the Sundance Institute. In the late 1990’s, Randy collaborated with the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities to create Coming Up Taller, the White House report on arts programs for youth-at-risk; and the U.S. Department of Justice to produce the YouthARTS Project, the first national study to statistically document the impact of arts programs on at-risk youth. A sought-after speaker, Randy has given speeches in all 50 states, and regularly appears in the news media—including the Wall Street JournalThe New York Times, and on C-SPAN, CNN, CNBC, and NPR.
     
    Randy has been a policy specialist for the National Endowment for the Arts, founded the San Diego Theatre for Young Audiences, and worked in medical research for Stanford University and Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. His board work includes the League of Historic American Theaters. Randy is a past Chairman of the Takoma Park Arts & Humanities Commission, during which time the Commission completed a cultural plan, established the city’s Poet Laureate and public art programs, and led the development of a million-dollar conversion of the city council chambers into a performing arts space.

    Twitter: @artsinfoguy

  • What COVID-19 Means for Local Option Taxes (and What To Do About It)

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Local option taxes are the lifeblood of certain local arts agencies (and, through grants, their communities)--but they are also one of the components of government funding that may be hit longest and hardest by COVID-19. In this session, break down what may happen to local option taxes, including hotel/motel taxes, taxes on goods, taxes on construction, etc, that are sometimes substantial funding streams--and talk about how to prepare, mitigate, and advocate to address the challenge.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    12:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Local option taxes are the lifeblood of certain local arts agencies (and, through grants, their communities)--but they are also one of the components of government funding that may be hit longest and hardest by COVID-19. In this session, break down what may happen to local option taxes, including hotel/motel taxes, taxes on goods, taxes on construction, etc, that are sometimes substantial funding streams--and talk about how to prepare, mitigate, and advocate to address the challenge.

    Learning Objectives
    • Breakdown what may happen to local option taxes due to COVID-19 and its aftermath.
    • Hear examples of how LAA leaders are working to try and mitigate the damage and find alternate funding streams to replace lagging local option tax funds.
    • Talk about how to advocate to address the loss in local option tax money or weather the storm.
    Speakers 

    Ruby Lopez Harper, Americans for the Arts
    Jonathon Glus, City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture
    Erin Harkey, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Ruby Lopez Harper

    Senior Director of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Ruby is the Senior Director of Local Arts Advancement for Americans for the Arts. She is the Co-chair for the National Coalition on Arts Preparedness and Emergency Response, serves as Co-chair on the Support for Individual Artist Steering Committee for Grantmakers in the Arts and serves on the WETA Community Advisory Council. She is also on the board of the Gard Foundation. Prior to joining AFTA, Ruby was the Director of Grants and Services at the Greater Columbus Arts Council in Columbus, OH. At the Greater Columbus Arts Council, Ruby focused on grantmaking, community development, economic development and tourism, and public art. She has a varied background that includes corporate affairs, marketing, and business administration. She served on the Emerging Leaders Council for Americans for the Arts and was the primary contact for the Arts and Economic Impact Study for Central Ohio. She also worked with PhilanthropyOhio on their Member Services Committee.

    Originally from California, where she was a dance instructor in her spare time, Ruby worked with local community theatre companies creating choreography for their musical theatre productions earning numerous local, state and regional recognition for her work both on and offstage. She has and continues to serve on grant panels for the Ohio Arts Council, Kentucky Arts Council, Cuyahoga Arts and Culture, MetroArts Nashville and the National Endowment for the Arts. Ruby has an associate degree from Cerritos College, a certificate in Corporate Community Involvement from Boston College, and is a trained meeting facilitator.

    Erin Harkey

    Deputy Commissioner, Programming, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events

    Erin Harkey maintains dual roles at the City of Chicago as the Deputy Commissioner of Programming at the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) and the Senior Advisor for Arts and Culture, Office of the Mayor where she directs cultural policy and programs. Prior to joining the City, Erin held positions at the District of Columbia Arts Center in Washington DC, the Japanese American National Museum, the Music Center of Los Angeles County, the Arts Council for Long Beach, and the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. Erin has two master’s degrees in Public Art Administration and Urban Planning from the University of Southern California (USC) and a bachelor’s degree in Marketing from Howard University.

    Jonathon Glus

    Executive Director, City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture

    Jonathon is cultural advisor to the mayor of San Diego and responsible for a department that includes grantmaking and public art, creative industries, special events and film. His portfolio also includes international affairs with an emphasis on binational initiatives with the City of Tijuana and Baja, California, Mexico.

    With extensive experience in arts tourism and advocacy, Glus’s current focus is centering cultural investment at the neighborhood level and at the border. 

    Previous positions include CEO of Houston Arts Alliance; director of culture and creative economy for the city of Sacramento; and executive director of arts and culture for the city of Pasadena, CA. 

    Glus studied art and architectural history at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His undergraduate work was in urban economics and public policy at Indiana University, Bloomington, and liberal studies at Earlham College.  


  • An Artistic Dialogue with Vijay Gupta

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Following his Nancy Hanks Lecture, Annual Convention attendees can get a special opportunity to hear more from, and engage with, MacArthur Fellow and musician Vijay Gupta in this special session.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    12:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Following his Nancy Hanks Lecture, Annual Convention attendees can get a special opportunity to hear more from, and engage with, MacArthur Fellow and musician Vijay Gupta in this special session.

    Learning Objectives
    • Get up close and personal with MacArthur Fellow Vijay Gupta.
    • Dig deeper into Vijay Gupta's topics and themes from his Nancy Hanks lecture.
    • Reflect on the challenges of this moment with a leading voice for arts-based social change.
    Speakers 

    Vijay Gupta, Renown Citizen Artist, Social Justice Advocate, Acclaimed Violinist, 2018 MacArthur Fellow, and Americans for the Arts Board Member

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Vijay Gupta

    Renown Citizen Artist, Social Justice Advocate, Acclaimed Violinist, 2018 MacArthur Fellow, and Americans for the Arts Board Member

    Vijay Gupta is a violinist and social justice advocate. An esteemed performer, communicator, and citizen-artist, Gupta is a leading advocate for the role of the arts and music to heal, inspire, provoke change, and foster social connection. Gupta is the founder and Artistic Director of Street Symphony, a nonprofit organization providing musical engagement, dialogue, and teaching artistry for homeless and incarcerated communities in Los Angeles.

    Recognized for his “dedication to bringing beauty, respite, and purpose to those all too often ignored by society while demonstrating the capacity of music to validate our shared humanity,” Vijay Gupta is a 2018 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow.

    Vijay Gupta is a celebrated speaker, educator, and advocate, and works as a consultant and guest lecturer with education, performance, and presentation institutions across the U.S. and Canada. He currently serves on the faculty of The Colburn School and Longy School of Music and is the Senior Program and Artistic Advisor of Young Musician’s Foundation, an LA-based musical training, performance, and advocacy organization. Gupta also serves on the board of directors of the D.C.-based national arts advocacy organization Americans for the Arts, as well as Los Angeles’ beloved 24th Street Theatre.

    An acclaimed violinist and seasoned international performing artist since the age of eight, Gupta made his solo debut with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Zubin Mehta at age 11. In 2007, at 19, Gupta joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, and served as a member of the First Violin section through 2018. He has appeared as a guest concertmaster with the Los Angeles Opera and the Philharmonia Orchestra of London, and is an active recitalist, soloist, and chamber musician.

    Gupta holds a BS in biology from Marist College (‘05) and an MM in violin performance from the Yale School of Music (‘07). Gupta is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters by the University of La Verne and the 2017 Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award from the Longy School of Music. Gupta is a 2017 Citizen Artist Fellow with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and a 2011 TED Senior Fellow. Gupta is represented as a speaker by the Lavin Agency and performs on a 2015 violin made by Los Angeles maker Eric Benning.

  • Creating Your Quick Pitch on The Relevance of Arts Now

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    We’re in the middle of a moment where the relevance of the arts is in question even for our staunchest allies. When the whole world is on fire, how do you explain the relevance of the arts? How do you get people who are not on your boat onboard when it comes to the usefulness, value, and impact of arts and culture on communities? In this workshop, learn to match what you have to what they need, use language that they understand, and back it up.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    1:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    We’re in the middle of a moment where the relevance of the arts is in question even for our staunchest allies. When the whole world is on fire, how do you explain the relevance of the arts? How do you get people who are not on your boat onboard when it comes to the usefulness, value, and impact of arts and culture on communities? In this workshop, learn to match what you have to what they need, use language that they understand, and back it up.

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn what framing science is and how it is applicable for the arts--particularly when it comes to the arts and other community issues.
    • Explore actual case studies and go step-by-step through why they succeeded or failed.
    • Map out your strategies for communicating the value of the arts in your community, particularly right now.
    Speakers 

    Margy Waller, Topos Partnership
    Shannon Daut, City of Santa Monica

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Margy Waller

    Senior Fellow, Topos Partnership

    Margy Waller is an advocate for building community through the arts. She is a Senior Fellow at Topos Partnership (a national strategic communications organization), founder and Serendipity Director of Art on the Streets, and was a leader in the transformation of ArtsWave, an arts advocacy and support non-profit. She is an advisor to national organizations like Americans for the Arts, PolicyLink, and LISC, currently serving as field coordinator for four leading creative placemaking organizations, ArtPlace, Kresge Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and Arizona State University. Previously she was Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, with a joint appointment in the Economic Studies and Metropolitan Policy programs.

    Prior to Brookings, she was Senior Advisor on domestic policy in the Clinton White House. Before joining the Administration, Margy was Senior Fellow for Social Policy and Director of the Working Families Project at the Progressive Policy Institute. She also served as Director of Public Policy at United Way of America, and Director of Policy Development at Public/Private Ventures in Philadelphia, and a congressional fellow in the office of U.S. Representative Eric Fingerhut (D-OH). Margy holds a Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies from Northwestern University and a J.D. from The Ohio State University. She comments on arts, place, and community at @margyartgrrl and her ArtsJournal blog, The Bright Ride.

    Twitter: @margyartgrrl

    Websites 

    www.topospartnership.com       

    https://www.artsjournal.com/brightride/

    Shannon Daut

    Manager of Cultural Affairs, City of Santa Monica

    Shannon leads the Cultural Affairs Division for the City of Santa Monica, where she works to integrate the arts into all aspects of life in the community. She was previously the Executive Director of the Alaska State Council on the Arts. While there, she re-imagined and re-invigorated the leadership role of the agency in state policy, from tourism and economic development to education and Alaska Native cultural advancement. Prior to moving to Alaska, Daut was Deputy Director of the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF), where she oversaw the organization's work in the areas of cultural policy and technology. Daut has served on the boards of the National Performance Network/Visual Arts Network, the Association of Performing Arts Presenters and WESTAF. Daut received her bachelor's degree in Communication Arts/Film from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her graduate degree in Communication/Rhetoric from the University of Colorado-Denver.

  • Navigating Your Board through Anxious Times

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    How do we help our boards succeed in a time of heightened anxiety? In this session, two veteran non-profit leaders, Dave Lawrence and Karen Gahl-Mills, will facilitate a candid conversation about boards and uncertainty, with the objective of creating a set of tools for both non-profit executives and board members that can be applied to organizations and boards of all sizes. What is the leader’s role in managing board anxiety? How can we help some of our most dedicated volunteers stay the course? How can we, as non-profit leaders, empower our boards during times of crisis?

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    1:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    How do we help our boards succeed in a time of heightened anxiety?  In this session, two veteran non-profit leaders, Dave Lawrence and Karen Gahl-Mills, will facilitate a candid conversation about boards and uncertainty, with the objective of creating a set of tools for both non-profit executives and board members that can be applied to organizations and boards of all sizes. What is the leader’s role in managing board anxiety? How can we help some of our most dedicated volunteers stay the course? How can we, as non-profit leaders, empower our boards during times of crisis?

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn how to better understand the dynamics at play when a board faces a challenge.
    • Explore how to objectively reflect on and interpret their own board challenges.
    • Walk through how to construct and apply a set of practical tools to apply to our current and future situations.
    • Attendees will build a network of support that they can draw on in the future.
    Speakers 

    Karen Gahl-Mills, Indiana University
    Dave Lawrence, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Dave Lawrence

    President and CEO, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

    Dave Lawrence is the President & CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County serving as the chief arts advocate for the arts and cultural community. His work includes the development of grants and initiatives for arts and cultural organizations and professional artists, cultural tourism, organizational development, marketing, advocacy and arts policy development, strategic planning, and public art. His latest effort is the creation of the new Artist Innovation Fellowship program for creative professionals throughout Palm Beach County. Prior to his appointment at the Cultural Council, he was the President & CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis. He conceived, created and launched Indianapolis’ citywide murals program, 46 for XLVI, which received national and international acclaim and for which he received Indianapolis’ NUVO Cultural Vision Award. Dave created innovative arts infusion strategies for major sporting events such as the 2005 US World Swimming Trials, the 2015 NCAA Men’s Final Four and the 100th Running of the Indianapolis 500. Dave was a member of the Host Committee Co-Chair for Cultural & Arts Programs for Super Bowl XLVI. In August of 2018, Dave was named a Sagamore of the Wabash by Governor Eric Holcomb, one of Indiana’s highest honors. This past January, Dave was honored for his work in Palm Beach County by Art Synergy with the Vision 2020 Award. Dave received a B.A. in communication from DePauw University.

    Karen Gahl-Mills

    Visiting Clinical Associate Professor, Indiana University

     

    Karen Gahl-Mills facilitates learning to drive systems change.  She is a Visiting Clinical Associate Professor at the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University, the Senior Advisor to the Center for Cultural Affairs at the O’Neill School, and a lecturer at Harris Public Policy at the University of Chicago. She came to teaching after a career as a public and non-profit sector leader, including CEO roles at Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a large grantmaking organization in Cleveland, Ohio, the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra in upstate New York, and the Westchester Philharmonic in suburban New York City.  She applies practical lessons from her distinguished career to teaching courses in nonprofit governance, leadership, strategy, fundraising and public policy. 

    She serves on the board of the Old Town School of Folk Music, the campaign cabinet for Lutheran Metropolitan Ministries Breaking New Ground campaign, and she has been a volunteer consultant for the Civic Consulting Alliance.  She holds a Bachelor of Music degree from DePaul University and an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.   She lives in Chicago’s Old Town neighborhood with her husband.

  • Supporting and Encouraging Parent Advocacy for Arts Education

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Parents are crucial advocates for arts education at all levels, but particularly locally. This is particularly true for the next two years, as education systems across the United States prepare for major economic hardship, including having to let teachers go. In this session, explore a newly-unveiled advocacy guide for parents created with the National PTA, talk about the mobilization power of parents, and think through how you can best use parents for arts advocacy in your community in a moment when arts educators may be in danger.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    1:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Parents are crucial advocates for arts education at all levels, but particularly locally. This is particularly true for the next two years, as education systems across the United States prepare for major economic hardship, including having to let teachers go. In this session, explore a newly-unveiled advocacy guide for parents created with the National PTA, talk about the mobilization power of parents, and think through how you can best use parents for arts advocacy in your community in a moment when arts educators may be in danger.

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn how to mobilize parents as advocates for arts education.
    • Explore a written advocacy guide for parents created in conjunction with the National PTA.
    • Get familiar with the likely challenges coming for arts educators and how parents can help.

    Speakers 

    Kelly Fey Bolender, Americans for the Arts
    Kymberly Cruz, Pittsburgh Public Schools
    Katie Sprouse, Virginia PTA


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Kelly Fey Bolender

    Arts Education Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Kelly Fey Bolender currently serves as Arts Education Program Manager for Americans for the Arts. Formerly, she held the position of Associate Director of Education at the Boch Center in Boston, MA. While serving as Associate Director, she led the Boch Center’s flagship arts-based youth leadership and employment programs, including the nationally-recognized City Spotlights Summer Leadership Program and Teen Leadership Council. Additionally at the Boch Center, she developed and facilitated arts-based literacy curriculum for the Target Arts In-School Residency Program and the Dudley Library Arts Festival. She also worked extensively in college and career readiness training for high school students, developing innovative programming for the Boch Center and the Universities at Shady Grove.

    Kelly centers her work on inclusivity and expanding access in the arts. Her original research exploring best practices for inclusivity and representation of marginalized populations in theatre for young audiences (TYA) in the United States is featured in the award-winning anthology of Latinx TYA, Palabras del Cielo: An Exploration of Latin@ Theatre for Young Audiences.

    She served on the Board of Directors for the American Alliance for Theatre and Education (AATE) and the New England Theatre Conference. She earned a Master’s in Theatre Education with a concentration in Theatre and Community from Emerson College, a Bachelor's degree in Media and Communication Studies from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a certification in the Advancing Youth Development curriculum for youth workers.

    Twitter: @ArtsEdKelly

    Website: AmericansForTheArts.org

    Kymberly Cruz

    Senior Program Officer, Arts Education, Pittsburgh Public Schools

    Dr. Kymberly M. Cruz is the Senior Program Officer for Arts Education for Pittsburgh Public Schools who’s responsible for driving the mission and vision for the district’s arts department.  She directs the strategic implementation of goals and associated initiatives that are rooted in quality, access, and equity. She believes all children should have an unconditional quality arts education experience, period. 


    With nearly 23 years in arts education and leadership, Kymberly leverages her experience in collaboration and strategic planning to promote arts learning with an unwavering commitment to her core values.  She was awarded Teacher of the Year in 2013—an award that recognizes excellence in teaching by honoring teachers who have made outstanding academic contributions to children voted on by peers. 


    Kymberly holds a Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning from Georgia State University. She serves on the Arts Education Advisory Council for the Americans for the Arts.

    Katie Sprouse

    Reflections Chair, Virginia PTA

    Katie Sprouse is the Reflections Chairperson for the Virginia PTA, the State branch of the nation’s oldest and largest volunteer child advocacy association. She has over 10 years of Arts in Education leadership experience at all levels of PTA within the Commonwealth of Virginia.


    Katie began her “other” career in 2007 as a midnight shift 911 dispatcher. Over the last 13 years, she has served the citizens and public safety user agencies within the Central Virginia region, achieving the rank of Senior Communications Officer. She has earned several certifications, including Department of Criminal Justice Services General Instructor and Communications Training Officer. 


    A mother of two children and one fur baby, Katie is a dedicated and passionate advocate for children and their right to receiving a quality public education, to include fine arts education in any/all forms, no matter their demographics, ethnicity, or socio-economic standing. In addition to her passion for child welfare and arts education, Katie is passionate about animal welfare. She is currently serving as the President of the Board of Directors for the Veterinary Emergency Treatment Fund (VET-Fund), a non-profit providing funding for emergency veterinary treatment for animals.


    Katie serves her local community through membership on the Community Equity Advisory Committee and the Return to Learning Advisory Board with her local school board office. Katie also represents the Virginia PTA on the board of the Virginia Coalition for Fine Arts Education. The VCFAE’s mission is to bring together arts education stakeholders to promote and advocate for sequential, high quality arts programs for all children in the Commonwealth taught by highly qualified arts educators. 

  • Ashara Ekundayo on the Artist as First Responder

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    When there is a disaster or drastic urgent need in community, our creative selves emerge to forge solutions and interventions. This creative work saves lives. Artists respond by rescuing, making, and stewarding creative pursuits on the frontline edges of catastrophe and celebration. In this talk, artist, curator, and organizer Ashara Ekundayo discusses Artist as First Responder, an interactive platform with digital media and print ephemera highlighting the work of international artists whose creative practices save lives and heal communities.

    Tuesday, June 23, 2020
    2:45 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    When there is a disaster or drastic urgent need in community, our creative selves emerge to forge solutions and interventions. This creative work saves lives. Artists respond by rescuing, making, and stewarding creative pursuits on the frontline edges of catastrophe and celebration. In this talk, artist, curator, and organizer Ashara Ekundayo discusses Artist as First Responder, an interactive platform with digital media and print ephemera highlighting the work of international artists whose creative practices save lives and heal communities.

    Learning Objectives
    • Get to know the remarkable energy and wisdom of curator and activist Ashara Ekundayo. Explore the concept of the artist as someone in the same category as first responders, and a new interactive digital media platform to highlight that work.
    • Gain a roster of artists whose creative practices are saving lives and healing communities.


    Speakers 

    Ashara Ekundayo, Creator, Curator, and Cultural Strategist


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Ashara Ekundayo

    Creator, Curator, Cultural Strategist

    Ashara Ekundayo is a Detroit-born, Oakland-based independent curator, artist, creative industries entrepreneur and organizer working internationally across cultural, spiritual, civic, and social innovation spaces. Through her company AECreative Consulting Partners she places artists and cultural production as essential in equitable design practices, real estate development, and movement building. Some of her past business ventures include Impact Hub Oakland, Omi Arts Project + Space, and Ashara Ekundayo Gallery - in 2020 she will open Blatant, a multi-media community archive fueled by the artwork of the current global uprising for social justice. She is also a “pleasure activist” and her creative arts practice epistemology requires an embodied commitment to recognizing joy in the midst of struggle. As a social practice installation artist who designs site-specific commissioned altar pieces, stewards public meditation ceremonies, and designs public printmaking ceremonies often participating in direct actions at political protests, Ashara’s works are intentionally collaborative, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational. Her work has been shown in spaces such as Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco-CA, the Allied Media Conference in Detroit-MI, Sellars Space in Denver-CO, and GoDownArts in Nairobi, Kenya. Currently Ashara serves as Chief Creative Catalyst for the Bay Area Girls & Womxn of Color Collaborative, sits on the Advisory Board of the Oakland Public Conservatory of Music, and is a Co-Founder of the artist & curatorial collective #SeeBlackWomen. Her new media platform “Artist As First Responder” excavates, documents, and nurtures the present-day and next generation of cultural workers whose art practices heal communities and save lives.

    Twitter/IG: blublakwomyn 
    Website: ArtistAsFirstResponder.com