Day 2: Public Art & Civic Design, Adapting to Change

  • Registration Closed
Day 2 focuses on the intersection between public art & civic design and how this work is being addressed in communities across the United States during this time of unprecedented change. Join public art practitioners across the country as we learn and lead together through this crisis and upcoming recovery. 

Wednesday, June 24, 2020
11:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. EDT

 
Includes:
• Keynote from Paul M. Farber, Artistic Director and Co-Founder of Monument Lab, the independent public art and history studio.
• Artists-led interactive sessions.
• The how-tos of managing public art projects and collections during a pandemic.
• Ways to keep the local public art ecosystem moving through partnerships and case-making.
• Sessions on how public art can help with recovery and public health initiatives.
• Interaction with exhibitors including: Artists Thrive, Goucher College MA in Arts Administration, Performing Arts Readiness, SmartSimple, SMU DataArts, and WESTAF - Western States Arts Federation.  
• And more!

Come back soon for the full event agenda!


BEFORE YOU REGISTER:

You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event. Please see the below “How To Register” section for more details on registering. 


Become a professional member of Americans for the Arts before you register and save on registration fees!  
Members at the $75 level or higher save on one-day and full conference rates. Plus, your membership includes a year of connections with 7,000 arts leaders across the country and access to member-exclusive tools and resources, including more digital learning opportunities on ArtsU! 

The Full List of Membership Benefits

ALREADY A MEMBER?
How to access your membership discounts: 
1. Log in to AmericansfortheArts.org to confirm your membership status. 
2. Head over to ArtsU. Your membership benefits will now be applied to any purchases you make. 
3. Then, pick the registration option of your choice!


WANT TO BECOME A MEMBER?
 

You can become a member online or call us at 202.371.2830. Become a member before you register to take advantage of the discounts!

PROFESSIONAL MEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $200
One-Day Event Access:   $100


In order to take advantage of the Member rate, you must purchase a membership PRIOR to registering for the event. If membership is purchased after registering for the event, we will not be able to adjust registration rates retroactively.


NONMEMBER AND DIGITAL MEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $275
One-Day Event Access:   $150

HOW TO REGISTER:

To register only one day of the event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart. If you want to register for more than one day of the event, click  ADD TO CART AND COMPLETE REGISTRATION LATER and you may continue to add products to your cart.

You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register - If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event

By registering for this package, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.

DONATE NOW:

Americans for the Arts is committed to providing training and resources to support the arts and culture field, right now and through the long road of recovery ahead. If you are able, please consider making a donation today to sustain that work.

  • KEYNOTE: The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy (On-Demand)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Presented by Americans for the Arts, the Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy is a leading national forum for arts policy intended to stimulate dialogue on policy and social issues affecting the arts. The annual lecture is named for Nancy Hanks, former president of Americans for the Arts and chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, who devoted 15 years of her professional life to bringing the arts to prominent national consciousness.

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    Please note: 

    The live viewing for the 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy has already occurred. You may still register for the event to have access to the recorded content. 

    The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy was presented live as the opening keynote presentation of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 at 11:30 AM EDT.  Delivering this year's lecture virtually will be Vijay Gupta, renown citizen artist, social justice advocate, acclaimed violinist, 2018 MacArthur Fellow, and Americans for the Arts board member. You can view this thought-provoking and artistic event free by either registering here on this page for just the lecture or registering for the entire Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference, where the lecture is included in your paid registration.


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    Lecturer's Bio

    Vijay Gupta believes that the work of the artist and the work of citizenship is the same: to create the world we want to see in our small, everyday actions—one person, one relationship, and one note at a time.

     Hailed as “one of the most radical thinkers in the unradical world of American classical music,” Mr. Gupta is an esteemed violinist and speaker. Mr. Gupta’s labor of love lies in the founding and directing of Street Symphony, which brings music to people in shelters, clinics, county jails and prisons. Mr. Gupta’s work serves to engage people across vast social and economic differences—people who would often never be in the same room together—to create new transformative conversations about belonging and citizenship. Mr. Gupta’s work brings beauty, respite, and purpose to those all too often ignored by society, while encouraging us to reflect on many ways we can all make a difference and truly be citizens in our world today.

     We all have a story that matters. Mr. Gupta’s story began just north of New York City in 1987, where he was born to Indian immigrants who immersed him equally in the cultures of West Bengal and Western Europe. Mr. Gupta began playing the violin at a young age, and after only three years of study, auditioned for the Juilliard School of Music Pre-College program. He played his solo debut under the baton of Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, and as a teenager, toured the U.S., Europe, Japan, and his Indian motherland as a soloist and recitalist. As an undergraduate, he continued to study violin performance while also following a course of study in biology, which led him to research internships at City University of New York and the Harvard Institutes of Medicine where, ironically, he received the most encouragement and support to make a life not as a researcher or doctor, but as a musician. Mr. Gupta continued his musical training at the Yale School of Music before taking an audition for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra where, in 2007, he became the youngest violinist to win a position in the orchestra’s history. 

     Soon after joining the orchestra, Mr. Gupta discovered that his new hometown was the epicenter of the crisis of homelessness in America today. Even in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis today, thousands of Angelenos sleep on the streets, and even more are incarcerated in the largest county jail system on the planet—effectively our world’s largest psychiatric facility. In 2010, Mr. Gupta started organizing musical events for audiences he would never meet in Walt Disney Concert Hall, performing classical chamber music with his colleagues across the city at homeless shelters, mental health clinics, hospitals and Veterans centers, Los Angeles county jails and California state prisons—and even the very streets of Skid Row. 

     As a grassroots movement of music, the musical offerings of Street Symphony encompass not only the world of classical and choral music, but the traditions of Mariachi, Jazz, West-African drumming, Romani music, folk songs, and most importantly, musical offerings from and by the community of Skid Row—music from people who have themselves experienced homelessness and incarceration. In this radical model of hospitality and exchange, the musicians of Street Symphony share their gifts, and their stage, with the community they serve. They learn and grow with each other. Mr. Gupta says that often, the professionals are the ones who walk away with the greater gift.

     Mr. Gupta is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a 2017 Citizen Artist Fellowship from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and a 2018 MacArthur Fellowship. (Each day, Mr. Gupta shares a musical meditation on Instagram centered on the music of Bach, and he encourages you to all follow along @Gupta_violin).  

    Introductory Remarks
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    Nancy Pelosi is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Ms. Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years.

    As Speaker Ms. Pelosi is fighting for the people, working to lower health care costs, increase workers’ pay through strong economic growth and rebuilding America, and clean up corruption to make Washington work for all.

    Thanks to Our Sponsors

    Special thanks to The Rosenthal Family Foundation (Jamie Rosenthal Wolf, Rick Rosenthal, and Nancy Stephens) and Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck for their generous support of this keynote.


    HOW TO REGISTER:

    To register for this event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart.

    You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.  

    By registering for this event, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.


  • KEYNOTE: On Power and Participation: Public Art and Radical Visions toward Justice, Repair, and Regrowth

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    Monument Lab's co-founder Paul Farber offers reports of urgency and purpose for the field of public art. Over the last decade, artists, activists, and cultural organizers have pushed the status quo in public art, especially to reckon with symbols and systems of injustice. In the midst of sweeping protests against anti-Black racism, police brutality, and the carceral state, monuments continue to serve as focal points for struggle and platforms to push for new democratic visions. The reenvisioning of public art must radically change the ways we create, maintain, and engage our public art and history. Farber shares stories from Monument Lab projects and partnerships, reflections on recent monument takedowns around the world, and a wishlist and action items for the next generation of monuments.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    11:30 a.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Monument Lab's co-founder Paul Farber offers reports of urgency and purpose for the field of public art. Over the last decade, artists, activists, and cultural organizers have pushed the status quo in public art, especially to reckon with symbols and systems of injustice. In the midst of sweeping protests against anti-Black racism, police brutality, and the carceral state, monuments continue to serve as focal points for struggle and platforms to push for new democratic visions. The reenvisioning of public art must radically change the ways we create, maintain, and engage our public art and history. Farber shares stories from Monument Lab projects and partnerships, reflections on recent monument takedowns around the world, and a wishlist and action items for the next generation of monuments.

    Speaker 

    Paul Farber, Monument Lab
    Bob Lynch, Americans for the Arts
    Patricia Walsh, Americans for the Arts  


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Paul Farber

    Artistic Director, Monument Lab

    Paul M. Farber, PhD is a curator, historian, and educator from Philadelphia. He is Artistic Director and Co-Founder of Monument Lab. He is also Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Public Art & Space at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design. Farber's research and curatorial projects explore transnational urban history, cultural memory, and creative approaches to civic engagement. He is the author of A Wall of Our Own: An American History of the Berlin Wall (University of North Carolina Press, 2020) which tells the untold story of a group of American artists and writers (Leonard Freed, Angela Davis, Shinkichi Tajiri, and Audre Lorde) who found refuge along the Berlin Wall and in Cold War Germany in order to confront political divisions back home in the United States. He is also the co-editor with Ken Lum of Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Philadelphia (Temple University Press, 2019), a public art and history handbook designed to generate new critical ways of thinking about and building monuments. 

     

    @Paul_Farber @Monument_Lab

    Patricia Walsh

    Public Art & Civic Design Senior Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Patricia Walsh joined Americans for the Arts in 2014 where she works to empower public art professionals, artists and other stakeholders in the implementation of public art in their communities by supporting best practices, case studies, resource development, and peer-to-peer networking.
     
    In her role at Americans for the Arts, Patricia has grown the annual Public Art Preconference to over 300 attendees, moderates the 400+ membership-based Public Art Network, and travels frequently to communities across the country to engage and learn from her colleagues working locally. She designed the Public Art Resource Center, an online portal to increase access to tools, resources, and opportunities for those making public art happen in their communities. She manages partnerships with Smart Growth America/Transportation for America and the American Planning Association and continues to develop strategies to engage allied fields to cultivate policy and practice that supports public art in the built environment across the country.

    Robert L. Lynch

    President and CEO, Americans for the Arts

    Robert L. Lynch is president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. With more than 43 years of experience in the arts industry, he is motivated by his personal mission to empower communities and leaders to advance the arts in society, and in the lives of citizens.

    In 1996, Mr. Lynch managed the successful merger of the National Assembly of Local Arts Agencies, where he had spent 12 years as executive director, with the American Council for the Arts to form Americans for the Arts. Under his 33 years of leadership, the services and membership of Americans for the Arts have grown to more than 50 times their original size. He has personally reached audiences in over 2,000 locations spanning all 50 states and more than a dozen nations, with diverse constituencies ranging from Native American tribal gatherings to the U.S. Armed Forces in Europe to the President of the United States.

    During his tenure at Americans for the Arts, Mr. Lynch has overseen six mergers including the Arts and Business Council, Inc. and the Business Committee for the Arts into Americans for the Arts. He has also created the Americans for the Arts Action Fund and its connected political action committee to establish arts-friendly public policy through engaging citizens to advocate for the arts and arts education.

    Under his direction, Americans for the Arts has become a leader in documenting and articulating the key role played by the nonprofit arts and culture industry, and their audiences, in strengthening our nation’s economy including its signature study of the economic impact of the nonprofit arts community, Arts and Economic Prosperity V. He has also been instrumental in creating a strong portfolio of projects and information about the transformative power of the arts in non-arts areas such as civic dialogue, social problem solving and work with the Pentagon, West Point, and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on the arts and military.  

    Mr. Lynch currently serves on the board of the Independent Sector. He has also served two terms on the U.S. Travel and Tourism Advisory Board, a position appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce. In 2017, he was the inaugural recipient of the JFK Commonwealth Award from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. In 2014, he was awarded the Sidney R. Yates Award for Outstanding Advocacy on Behalf of the Performing Arts, and he was selected as one of the most influential executives in the nonprofit sector for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 NonProfit Times Power & Influence Top 50.

    Mr. Lynch earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and enjoys playing the piano, mandolin, and guitar. He lives in Washington, DC.

  • Caring for Outdoor Artworks in a Pandemic

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    In this session, conservator Rosa Lowinger will speak about issues related to cleaning works of art in the time of COVID and present research she has conducted on the historical role of unauthorized interventions into works of public art (traditionally known as vandalism).

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    In this session, conservator Rosa Lowinger will speak about issues related to cleaning works of art in the time of COVID and present research she has conducted on the historical role of unauthorized interventions into works of public art (traditionally known as vandalism). 

    Speakers 

    Rosa Lowinger, Rosa Lowinger & Associates


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Rosa Lowinger

    Chief Conservator and CEO, Rosa Lowinger & Associates DBA RLA Conservation of Art + Architecture

    Rosa Lowinger is Chief Conservator and CEO of RLA Conservation of Art + Architecture, a firm with offices in Miami and Los Angeles that serves the conservation needs of several dozen public art agencies nationwide. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, and the 2008-09 Rome Prize Fellow in Conservation at the American Academy in Rome where she conducted a pilot project researching the history of vandalism to public art and public space. Rosa’s career in public art conservation began in 1988 with the treatment of works at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall and continued with the first survey of public art for the City of Los Angeles in 1995. She presently serves as a consultant to over two-dozen public art agencies and the Getty Conservation Institute’s Outdoor Painted Sculpture Initiative, a forum that aims to codify the aesthetics and conservation protocols for care of painted sculpture. She is the author of Tropicana Nights: The Life and Times of the Legendary Cuban Nightclub (Harcourt, 2005).

    Website: www.rlaconservation.com

    Twitter: @RLAconservation

  • The Role of Partnerships in Supporting Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    Working with other organizations to support artists during a time of crisis can go a long way in keeping a local public art ecosystem healthy and vibrant. In this session, attendees will learn about how one such partnership was utilized to pivot large, capital projects into localized investments to support artists during an economic crisis.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Working with other organizations to support artists during a time of crisis can go a long way in keeping a local public art ecosystem healthy and vibrant. In this session, attendees will learn about how one such partnership was utilized to pivot large, capital projects into localized investments to support artists during an economic crisis. 

    Speakers 

    Mandy Vink, Boulder Office of Arts + Culture


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Mindy Vink

    Public Art Administrator, Boulder Office of Arts + Culture

    Mandy Vink oversees the Creative Neighborhoods and Public Art programs for the city of Boulder, Colorado and is working to support the Community Cultural Plan’s charge to “reinvent Boulder’s public art program” through the creation of new projects, policies, and processes that best meet the needs of the community. Vink is particularly interested in community-initiated and environmentally-responsive opportunities. She is currently serving on the Americans for the Arts (AFTA) Public Art Network Council, and enjoys contributing to field discourse. She served as chair of the Contemporary Alliance Board of Directors, a board which supports the modern and contemporary collection of the Denver Art Museum (DAM) and now represents the department through the DAM’s Friends Advisory Board.

  • Transit Art Programs Respond to Crisis and Recovery

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    Based on info gathered from arts in transit programs around the country, this session will dive into how arts and design are being used to lead recovery efforts in transit systems. Looking at examples from urban, rural, and suburban areas, attendees will learn ways to incorporate arts and design into the revitalization of transit systems due to impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Based on information gathered from arts in transit programs around the country, this session will be a conversation about how arts and design approaches are included as part of the recovery efforts for transit systems. Looking at examples from around the country, attendees will learn and can share ways to incorporate arts and design into transit system recovery plans that are responsive to both the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the call to acknowledge and address long-standing racial injustice.


    Speakers 

    Clare Haggarty, LA Metro Arts & Design 
    Jennifer Easton, Bay Area Rapid Transit
    Chris Lange, Charlotte Area Transit System
    Katherine Dirga, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority 
    Marcus Young, Artist, Ananya Dance Theater


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Clare Haggarty

    Senior Manager, Transportation Planning (Arts & Design), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

    Clare Haggarty works for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) as a Senior Manager for Transportation Planning in Arts and Design. Metro is a world-class transportation system moving 10 million people a day throughout Los Angeles County. The Arts and Design group produces innovative, award-winning visual art and integrated design as well as performing arts programming that encourages ridership and connects people, sites and neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles County. Previously Ms. Haggarty was the Deputy Director of Collections for the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture. Ms. Haggarty has a master’s degree in History of Art from the University of Glasgow in Scotland and a master’s degree in Curatorial Practice from the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. Ms. Haggarty has served on the Public Art Network Advisory Council since 2017.

    Website: www.metro.net/art

    Christopher Lange

    Arts in Transit Manager, Charlotte Area Transit System

    Since 2014, Chris Lange has been the Art in Transit Program Administrator at Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) in North Carolina. He has managed public art projects from artist selection to fabrication and installation, including the award-winning Cornelius Park & Ride and LYNX Blue Line Extension. Prior to joining CATS, Lange was Program Director at Alamance County Arts Council in Graham, NC where he managed exhibits and educational programming. In all of Lange’s experience he has worked with organizations and municipalities to foster art opportunities to further advance local artists’ careers. He earned his Master of Arts in Arts Administration and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC. 

    Katherine Dirga

    Program Manager Art in Transit, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority

    Katherine Dirga is a public art specialist with 18 years’ experience. After beginning her career at Laumeier Sculpture Park in St. Louis, MO, Katherine served as a program manager of Atlanta Airport’s public art program, where she commissioned and implemented $3.5 million in large-scale artworks for the Maynard Jackson International Terminal, as well as curating temporary exhibitions and annual live music series. Katherine was brought to MARTA in 2017 to develop an Art in Transit program: “Artbound”, comprised of permanent and temporary visual artworks as well as live music, theater, and dance presented in a transit environment.
    Katherine has a deep interest in community and was a founding curator of the Cabbagetown Art Wall, working with other local curators, artists, and the CSX Railroad to produce what is now an annual rotating exhibition and event with over 40 artists and 25 murals in one of Atlanta’s most eclectic and walkable neighborhoods. She served as founding Board Chair for Dashboard, an Atlanta-based, national curatorial team, leading the Board as the organization scaled from local and regional to national projects during her four-year tenure.
    Katherine received her Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts from Washington University in St. Louis, and her Master’s Degree in Fine Arts from Georgia State University. She is a member of Arts Leaders of Metro Atlanta (ALMA) and has served on the Board and Advisory Councils for various local non-profits including Living Walls, Dashboard, and Cabbagetown Initiative.

    Jennifer Easton

    Arts Program Manager, Bay Area Rapid Transit

    Jennifer Easton is the Art Program Manager for BART - the San Francisco Bay Area heavy rail transit system. She is responsible for developing and implementing the art master plan, creating program guidelines, and creating community partnerships and funding for projects. Jennifer has an extensive career in both project and program management in the visual arts. She has curated numerous exhibitions, published articles and lectured in the field of contemporary art, public art, and building community and place with art and artists. Throughout her career, her areas of focus have included transportation, environmental, and creative placemaking that involved significant phases of community input, and design development in collaboration with artists and architects. She is currently a Cultural Affairs Commissioner for the City of Oakland, and an Art Committee Member for the San Diego Airport. Jennifer's previous positions include Director of Public Art for the City of San Jose; Director of Marketing & Development for the Berkeley Symphony; Curator for the City of Los Angeles; and Research Associate at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Jennifer holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from University of California, Davis, and a Master of Arts in Art History and Museum Studies from the University of Southern California.

     

    Marcus Young

    Collaborative Director, Ananya Dance Theater

    Marcus Young 楊墨 makes art to expand the repertoire of human behavior and the expressivity of social forms. From 2006 to 2015, he served as City Artist in St. Paul, MN, where he transformed the city’s sidewalk repair program into a publishing entity for poetry, an ongoing project called Everyday Poems for City Sidewalk. Since 2008, he has been creating Don’t You Feel It Too?—a participatory street dance practice of social and inner-life liberation. He is a recipient of awards from the McKnight, Bush, and Jerome Foundations. Marcus is currently Collaborating Director with Ananya Dance Theater, Lead Faculty and Program Director at HECUA's Art for Social Change, and artist-in-residence at the Minnesota Department of Transportation. DYFIT.org

  • Shared Online Co-Creation with Dance Exchange

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    This interactive session will use collective reflection and making as an opportunity to move and create as a way to notice our current world... and notice as a way to move and make. Dance Exchange artist Elizabeth Johnson Levine and artist Thomas Tyger Moore will connect with attendees to create a multi-disciplinary art that captures what we’re taking with us from this online conference experience.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    1:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    This interactive session will use collective reflection and making as an opportunity to move and create as a way to notice our current world... and notice as a way to move and make. Dance Exchange artist Elizabeth Johnson Levine and artist Thomas Tyger Moore will connect with attendees to create a multi-disciplinary art that captures what we’re taking with us from this online conference experience.

    Speakers 


    Elizabeth Johnson Levine, Dance Exchange 
    Thomas Tyger Moore, Artist/Facilitator 



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Elizabeth Johnson Levine

    Associate Artistic Director and Director of Partnerships, Dance Exchange

    Elizabeth Johnson (EJ, she/her/hers) is a choreographer, dancer, and educator focused on socially engaged dance practices. Johnson connects communities through choreography—promoting civic dialogue and designing participatory creative experiences. Her interests include work with youth and elders, embodied science learning, and leadership development through the arts.  EJ has been connected to Dance Exchange since 1998 and is currently Associate Artistic Director and Director of Partnerships. She recently worked with Liz Lerman at Arizona State University as the Co-Director (with Nik Zaleski) of CounterAct a multiyear campus wide Arts Based Initiative for Sexual Violence prevention.  She leads Dance Exchange’s partnership with Jacob’s Pillow Curriculum in Motion and is co-director of A body, home (commissioned by Arizona State University) and Of Equal Place: Isotopes in Motion (commissioned by Michigan State University). 

    Thomas Tyger Moore

    Artist Educator and Community Activist

    Thomas Tyger Moore (@thomastygermoore) is an artist educator/ facilitator/ dancer/ community actionist from Washington D.C. and currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. Moore has performed with The RED ProjectNYC, Dance Exchange, Christopher K. Morgan & Artists, VTDance, S.J Ewing & Dancers, Algernon Campbell Experience, and Dissonance Dance Theatre and black-duo collaboration “Thomas & Adrianne” (@thomasandadrianne). 

     

    Moore was one of 11 artists chosen for the 2017 International Dance Omi Artist Residency. He also joined Dance Exchange for their residency with Great Smoky Mountain National State Park for the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse and their arts integration residency in Tupelo, MS.  Moore has presented his work at Movement Research at Judson Memorial Church in New York, Alchemical Studios NYC, Center for Performance Research, Velocity Dance Festival, American Dance Institute and served as adjunct faculty at Georgetown and Towson University.

     

    Moore collaborates with Gibney Dance in New York as a Community Actionist, facilitating movement participation workshops for students and young adults around healthy relationships. He has also piloted their virtual facilitation programming for the youth in response to COVID-19 and Social Justice.

     

    Thomas graduated with a BFA in Dance Performance and  BA in Mass Communications/Journalism from Towson University.

  • Developing Effective Community Engagement While Social Distancing

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    In this session, attendees will hear and discuss different ways to engage with community stakeholders, artists and others while practicing social distancing. Through this session attendees will work with an expert in community engagement to identify methods to engage the public in the development of public art projects and programming. 

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    2:15 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    In this session, attendees will hear and discuss different ways to engage with community stakeholders, artists and others while practicing social distancing. Through this session attendees will work with an expert in community engagement to identify methods to engage the public in the development of public art projects and programming. 


    Speakers 

    James Rojas, Place It!


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    James Rojas

    Founder, Place It!

  • Using Arts and Culture to Create Healthy Open Spaces During Recovery

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    How can arts and culture can help us redefine open spaces as people are social distancing during a public health crisis? During this session, attendees will consider ways that the arts and artists are helping address issues of how spaces are designed and encouraging users to stay separated as we emerge for shelter-in-place orders.  

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    2:15 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    How can arts and culture can help us redefine open spaces as people are social distancing during a public health crisis? During this session, attendees will consider ways that the arts and artists are helping address issues of how spaces are designed and encouraging users to stay separated as we emerge for shelter-in-place orders.  



    Speakers 

    Miguel Vazquez, Planner
    Brittany Delany, Creative Professional, Dancer/Choreographer

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Brittany Delany

    Creative Professional, Dancer/Choreographer

    Brittany Delany is a creative professional and dancer/choreographer based in Los Angeles, California. She earned a B.A. in French Studies and a B.A. in Dance: Choreography & Performance from Wesleyan University. With over a decade of experience working for arts and culture organizations in the USA, she values the power of imagination and teamwork.

    Miguel A. Vazquez

    Planner

    Miguel A. Vazquez, AICP is a planner working at the intersection of urban planning and public health.  Diversity, inclusion and equity are the foundation of his ethos and praxis. Curiosity, creativity and innovation are his preferred conduits to educate, persuade and empower.  Presently, Miguel is the Healthy Communities Planner for the Riverside University Health System-Public Health and serves as Chair of the American Planning Association’s Arts in Planning Interest Group.

     

  • The Art of Creating Online Public Art Collections

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    In this session, attendees will hear how one public art program is using technology to connect their community with their public art collection while we are all social distancing and practicing shelter-in-place. Hear how this administrator is using technology like augmented reality to create an online experience highlighting the public art collection

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    4:00 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    In this session, attendees will hear how one public art program is using technology to connect their community with their public art collection while we are all social distancing and practicing shelter-in-place. Hear how this administrator is using technology like augmented reality to create an online experience highlighting the public art collection.

    Speakers 

    Lucas Anthony Cowan, Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Lucas Anthony Cowan

    Public Art Curator, Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy

    Lucas Cowan became the Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy’s first Director and Curator of Public Art in 2014. Previously, he was the Director for the Maryland State Arts Council Public Art Program, and the Senior Curator of Exhibits for both Millennium Park and the Chicago Office of Tourism and Culture. Over the last 16 years, he has curated and managed dozens of public art commissions and exhibitions by artists of national and international calibur in public spaces. Cowan has served on juries and panels across the United States, consulted on cultural park planning for cities such as San Francisco, Chicago and Northwest Arkansas and serves as trustee and advisor to prestigious visual arts organizations nationwide. He attended the Maryland Institute College of Art where he studied Fiber and Material Studies and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Master Program in Arts Administration.

  • Finding Funding for Public Art in a Pandemic

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/24/2020

    In this session, attendees will learn how to find funding for public art organizations and projects as we all wade through the numerous resources and support coming out in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to identify funds for the response to and recovery from the pandemic.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2020
    4:00 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    In this session, attendees will learn how to find funding for public art organizations and projects as we all wade through the numerous resources and support coming out in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to identify funds for the response to and recovery from the pandemic.


    Speakers 

    Ruby Lopez Harper, Americans for the Arts


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Ruby Lopez Harper

    Senior Director of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Ruby is the Senior Director of Local Arts Advancement for Americans for the Arts. She is the Co-chair for the National Coalition on Arts Preparedness and Emergency Response, serves as Co-chair on the Support for Individual Artist Steering Committee for Grantmakers in the Arts and serves on the WETA Community Advisory Council. She is also on the board of the Gard Foundation. Prior to joining AFTA, Ruby was the Director of Grants and Services at the Greater Columbus Arts Council in Columbus, OH. At the Greater Columbus Arts Council, Ruby focused on grantmaking, community development, economic development and tourism, and public art. She has a varied background that includes corporate affairs, marketing, and business administration. She served on the Emerging Leaders Council for Americans for the Arts and was the primary contact for the Arts and Economic Impact Study for Central Ohio. She also worked with PhilanthropyOhio on their Member Services Committee.

    Originally from California, where she was a dance instructor in her spare time, Ruby worked with local community theatre companies creating choreography for their musical theatre productions earning numerous local, state and regional recognition for her work both on and offstage. She has and continues to serve on grant panels for the Ohio Arts Council, Kentucky Arts Council, Cuyahoga Arts and Culture, MetroArts Nashville and the National Endowment for the Arts. Ruby has an associate degree from Cerritos College, a certificate in Corporate Community Involvement from Boston College, and is a trained meeting facilitator.