Day 3: Reimagination and Resilience

  • Registration Closed
The closing day of the Annual Convention is about bringing our creativity to bear in helping the country rebuild itself—and re-imagine a new, resilient way of living and being together where the arts can help our communities be healthier, more vibrant, and more equitable.

Thursday, June 25, 2020
11:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. EDT

 
Includes:
• Sessions on equity and job mobility in a pandemic. 
• Sessions on building partnerships and centering the arts in recovery.
• Connections and networking with arts leaders across the country.
• Interaction with exhibitors including: Artists Thrive, Goucher College MA in Arts Administration, Performing Arts Readiness, SmartSimple, SMU DataArts, and WESTAF - Western States Arts Federation.  
• And more! 

Come back soon for the full event agenda!


BEFORE YOU REGISTER:

You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event. Please see the below “How To Register” section for more details on registering. 


Become a professional member of Americans for the Arts before you register and save on registration fees!  
Members at the $75 level or higher save on one-day and full conference rates. Plus, your membership includes a year of connections with 7,000 arts leaders across the country and access to member-exclusive tools and resources, including more digital learning opportunities on ArtsU! 

The Full List of Membership Benefits

ALREADY A MEMBER? 
How to access your membership discounts:  
1. Log in to AmericansfortheArts.org to confirm your membership status.  
2. Head over to ArtsU. Your membership benefits will now be applied to any purchases you make.  
3. Then, pick the registration option of your choice!

WANT TO BECOME A MEMBER? 

You can become a member online or call us at 202.371.2830. Become a member before you register to take advantage of the discounts!

PROFESSIONAL MEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $200
One-Day Event Access:   $100


In order to take advantage of the member rate, you must purchase a membership PRIOR to registering for the event. If membership is purchased after registering for the event, we will not be able to adjust registration rates retroactively.

NONMEMBER RATES

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference Full Package:   $275
One-Day Event Access:   $150

HOW TO REGISTER:

To register only one day of the event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart. If you want to register for more than one day of the event, click  ADD TO CART AND COMPLETE REGISTRATION LATER and you may continue to add products to your cart.

You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register - If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.

By registering for this package, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.

DONATE NOW:

Americans for the Arts is committed to providing training and resources to support the arts and culture field, right now and through the long road of recovery ahead. If you are able, please consider making a donation today to sustain that work.

  • KEYNOTE: The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy (On-Demand)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    Presented by Americans for the Arts, the Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy is a leading national forum for arts policy intended to stimulate dialogue on policy and social issues affecting the arts. The annual lecture is named for Nancy Hanks, former president of Americans for the Arts and chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, who devoted 15 years of her professional life to bringing the arts to prominent national consciousness.

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    Please note: 

    The live viewing for the 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy has already occurred. You may still register for the event to have access to the recorded content. 

    The 33rd Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts & Public Policy was presented live as the opening keynote presentation of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 at 11:30 AM EDT.  Delivering this year's lecture virtually will be Vijay Gupta, renown citizen artist, social justice advocate, acclaimed violinist, 2018 MacArthur Fellow, and Americans for the Arts board member. You can view this thought-provoking and artistic event free by either registering here on this page for just the lecture or registering for the entire Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference, where the lecture is included in your paid registration.


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    Lecturer's Bio

    Vijay Gupta believes that the work of the artist and the work of citizenship is the same: to create the world we want to see in our small, everyday actions—one person, one relationship, and one note at a time.

     Hailed as “one of the most radical thinkers in the unradical world of American classical music,” Mr. Gupta is an esteemed violinist and speaker. Mr. Gupta’s labor of love lies in the founding and directing of Street Symphony, which brings music to people in shelters, clinics, county jails and prisons. Mr. Gupta’s work serves to engage people across vast social and economic differences—people who would often never be in the same room together—to create new transformative conversations about belonging and citizenship. Mr. Gupta’s work brings beauty, respite, and purpose to those all too often ignored by society, while encouraging us to reflect on many ways we can all make a difference and truly be citizens in our world today.

     We all have a story that matters. Mr. Gupta’s story began just north of New York City in 1987, where he was born to Indian immigrants who immersed him equally in the cultures of West Bengal and Western Europe. Mr. Gupta began playing the violin at a young age, and after only three years of study, auditioned for the Juilliard School of Music Pre-College program. He played his solo debut under the baton of Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, and as a teenager, toured the U.S., Europe, Japan, and his Indian motherland as a soloist and recitalist. As an undergraduate, he continued to study violin performance while also following a course of study in biology, which led him to research internships at City University of New York and the Harvard Institutes of Medicine where, ironically, he received the most encouragement and support to make a life not as a researcher or doctor, but as a musician. Mr. Gupta continued his musical training at the Yale School of Music before taking an audition for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra where, in 2007, he became the youngest violinist to win a position in the orchestra’s history. 

     Soon after joining the orchestra, Mr. Gupta discovered that his new hometown was the epicenter of the crisis of homelessness in America today. Even in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis today, thousands of Angelenos sleep on the streets, and even more are incarcerated in the largest county jail system on the planet—effectively our world’s largest psychiatric facility. In 2010, Mr. Gupta started organizing musical events for audiences he would never meet in Walt Disney Concert Hall, performing classical chamber music with his colleagues across the city at homeless shelters, mental health clinics, hospitals and Veterans centers, Los Angeles county jails and California state prisons—and even the very streets of Skid Row. 

     As a grassroots movement of music, the musical offerings of Street Symphony encompass not only the world of classical and choral music, but the traditions of Mariachi, Jazz, West-African drumming, Romani music, folk songs, and most importantly, musical offerings from and by the community of Skid Row—music from people who have themselves experienced homelessness and incarceration. In this radical model of hospitality and exchange, the musicians of Street Symphony share their gifts, and their stage, with the community they serve. They learn and grow with each other. Mr. Gupta says that often, the professionals are the ones who walk away with the greater gift.

     Mr. Gupta is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a 2017 Citizen Artist Fellowship from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and a 2018 MacArthur Fellowship. (Each day, Mr. Gupta shares a musical meditation on Instagram centered on the music of Bach, and he encourages you to all follow along @Gupta_violin).  

    Introductory Remarks
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    Nancy Pelosi is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Ms. Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years.

    As Speaker Ms. Pelosi is fighting for the people, working to lower health care costs, increase workers’ pay through strong economic growth and rebuilding America, and clean up corruption to make Washington work for all.

    Thanks to Our Sponsors

    Special thanks to The Rosenthal Family Foundation (Jamie Rosenthal Wolf, Rick Rosenthal, and Nancy Stephens) and Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck for their generous support of this keynote.


    HOW TO REGISTER:

    To register for this event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart.

    You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.  

    By registering for this event, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures for the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference.


  • Getting and Keeping Artists at the Community Recovery Table

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    What does it take for agencies to educate, support, and advocate for artists at tables where the future of communities are being discussed? In a moment where every community is developing a taskforce to address recovery and reconstruction, learn how you can ensure that creative voices are at the table.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    What does it take for agencies to educate, support, and advocate for artists at tables where the future of communities are being discussed? In a moment where every community is developing a taskforce to address recovery and reconstruction, learn how you can ensure that creative voices are at the table.


    Learning Objectives
    • Gain deeper understanding of the importance of artists in the creative development of communities.
    • Explore avenues of supporting partnerships and collaborations that include artists.
    • Examine means for advancing artists training and preparation for working within communities.
    • Delve into examples of artists working in community development.


    Speakers 

    Roseann Weiss, ART+
    Pacia Elaine Anderson, Community Artist

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Website: https://www.roseannweiss.com/ 

    Email: roseannweiss@gmail.com

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Like her poetic work, Pacia Elaine Anderson's commitment to community care has its roots in the church. Guided by deeply spiritual elder women who ministered in jails, volunteered as
    hospice caregivers, and fostered children, Pacia Elaine learned early that a purposeful life is one that is lived creatively, communally, and in the humble service of others. As an adult, this
    self-described Word Artist 's work meets at the intersection of arts-learning and community development, with a focus on youth advocacy and the reclamation of the cultural traditions of
    the African Diaspora. Pacia Elaine collaborates as a teaching artist, creative consultant, and community development and engagement strategist with numerous organizations and institutions, both locally and nationally. In 2020 she was named Community Impact Artist by the St. Louis Visionary awards, and serves on the boards of Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts, and St. Louis Art Place, an artist housing initiative.

    Website: www.paciaelaine.com

    Email: paciaanderson@gmail.com

  • A New World Again: Beyond Recovery in the Time of Covid and Black Lives Matter

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    We began our planning for this workshop on May 26, 2020 the day after George Floyd’s murder. Our world had already completely been remade and we were yet to experience how it would transform again… and again and again. Many in the arts have finally realized that the work some have been doing as anti-racist artists and organizers for racial justice and cultural equity is no longer just about the survival of our arts sector, but the survival of our country and humanity. How do we not just lean in? What are our actions beyond witnessing? How do we become more strategic in connecting our lifted voices to dismantling the inequitable arts sector as we know it? This session will focus on pragmatic and strategic ways to move forward.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    We began our planning for this workshop on May 26, 2020  the day after George Floyd’s murder. Our world had already completely been remade and we were yet to experience how it would transform again… and again and again. Many in the arts have finally realized that the work some have  been doing as anti-racist artists and organizers for racial justice and cultural equity  is  no longer just about the survival of our arts sector, but the survival of our country and humanity. How do we not just lean in? What are our actions beyond witnessing? How do we become more strategic in connecting our lifted voices to dismantling the inequitable arts sector as we know it? This session will focus on pragmatic and strategic ways to move forward.


    Learning Objectives
    • Learn how to anti-racism has become a necessary starting point to saving the cultural sector and our communities.
    • Explore what it means to go beyond "leaning in" and "listening," to strategically and impactfully act.
    • Learn pragmatic and strategic ways to move forward with an anti-racist lens.

    Speakers 

    Kemi Ilsanemi, The Laundromat Project
    Roberta Uno, Arts in a Changing America 

    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Kemi Ilsanemi

    Executive Director, The Laundromat Project

    Kemi Ilesanmi is Executive Director of The Laundromat Project, which advances artists and neighbors as change agents in their own communities. She is inspired by the immense possibilities for joyful justice at the intersection of arts and community. She has previously worked at Creative Capital Foundation and Walker Art Center. In 2015, she was appointed by the Mayor of New York City to the Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission. She has been honored by the Metropolitan Museum and Project for Empty Space. She serves on the boards of the Joan Mitchell Foundation and The Broad Room. A graduate of Smith College, NYU, and Coro Leadership NY, she is also a Sterling Network Fellow.

    Roberta Uno

    Director, Arts in a Changing America

     

    Roberta Uno is a theater director, writer, and national arts leader. She is the Director of Arts in a Changing America, a national project on changing demographics and the arts based at the California Institute of the Arts. She was the Program Officer and then Senior Program Officer for Arts and Culture at the Ford Foundation 2002-2015. From 1979-2002, she was the founder and Artistic Director of the New WORLD Theater, a visionary theater dedicated to the work of artists of color, at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a Professor of directing and dramaturgy in the University’s Department of Theater. She directed, produced, presented, or dramaturged over 200 works at New WORLD Theater archived here. Her latest stage work is directing Try/Step/Trip by Dalhak Brathwaite, which received  a NEFA National Theater Project award. Born in Honolulu, HI, she is a haumana of Kumu Hula Vicky Holt Takamine and co-leads the NYC hālau extension, Pua Aliʻi ʻIlima o Nuioka. Her many publications include a new edition of the anthology, Contemporary Plays by Women of Color UK: Routledge.

  • Partnering with Community Foundations to Strengthen Arts Recovery

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    Community foundations help a community thrive in many ways and can be perfect collaborators for arts agencies and organizations, as they all work together to address broader social goals. In this session, explore what a 10-year initiative from the Barr Foundation can tell us about how arts organizations, agencies, and community foundations can work together to catalyze new leadership, energy, and resources in their communities during recovery and reconstruction.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Community foundations help a community thrive in many ways and can be perfect collaborators for arts agencies and organizations, as they all work together to address broader social goals. In this session, explore what a 10-year initiative from the Barr Foundation can tell us about how arts organizations, agencies, and community foundations can work together to catalyze new leadership, energy, and resources in their communities during recovery and reconstruction.

    Learning Objectives
    • Explore how community foundations and local arts agencies and arts organizations can partner in supporting community transformation.
    • Hear case studies of specific examples that addressed broader social community issues through the arts.
    • Discuss how such initiatives could be replicated in your own community.

    Speakers 

    San San Wong, Barr Foundation
    Katie Allan Zobel, Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts
    John Vasconcellos, Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts 


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Katie Allan Zobel

    President and CEO, Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts

    Katie Allan Zobel has served as President and CEO since 2013 and, for the eight years prior, as Vice President of Philanthropic Services. Katie worked for Amherst College for 11 years serving in a variety of fundraising roles and was director of annual giving for WGBY/Public Television prior to that. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the Western Mass EDC, the Coordinating Council for the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission’s Plan for Progress, Cooley Dickinson Hospital’s Patient Care Excellence Committee, Springfield Business Leaders for Education, and is co‐chair of the Western Massachusetts Funders’ Network. Katie holds a B.A. in English from Boston College and a Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy® (CAP®) designation from the American College.

    San San Wong

    Director, Arts & Creativity, Barr Foundation

    San San Wong leads Barr Foundation’s Arts & Creativity Program which seeks to invest in bold ideas and leaders, with an overarching goal to elevate the arts and enable creative expression to engage and inspire a dynamic, thriving Massachusetts. Barr pursues this goal through three strategies: advancing the field’s capacity to adapt and take risks; fostering opportunities to connect the arts to other sectors; and activating public support for the arts. Prior to joining Barr in 2012, San San served as director of grants at the San Francisco Arts Commission, executive director of the National Performance Network, a performing arts producer and presenter, and an international consultant for foundations and non-governmental organizations. San San is a board member of Grantmakers in the Arts.

    John Vasconcellos

    President, Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts

    John Vasconcellos is the President of the Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts, an organization which seeks to mobilize philanthropy by matching donors and resources with community needs for the benefit of the 41 communities in Southeastern Massachusetts. Previously, John served as Senior Regional Director for the Southeast and Boston Regions of The Trustees of Reservations. Other experience includes Managing Director of Development and Marketing for the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, Vice President of Development and Communications at the Buzzards Bay Coalition and Director of Development for the San Francisco AIDS Foundation.

  • Understanding Your Full Creative Economy to Look to Recovery

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    Local Arts Agencies and arts services organizations have focused on the creative economy for years—bringing artists and creative workers into the fold more inclusively as well as facilitating more partnership development between commercial and nonprofit arts organizations. With radical social and economic changes upon us, what is the future of this creative economy movement and how is it being affected by the pandemic environment? Join this session to explore how we balance the stories, research, policy to navigate through this crisis and look to build a truly inclusive creative economy.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    12:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Local Arts Agencies and arts services organizations have focused on the creative economy for years—bringing artists and creative workers into the fold more inclusively as well as facilitating more partnership development between commercial and nonprofit arts organizations. With radical social and economic changes upon us, what is the future of this creative economy movement and how is it being affected by the pandemic environment? Join this session to explore how we balance the stories, research, policy to navigate through this crisis and look to build a truly inclusive creative economy.

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn about communities that had developed or were in the process of developing community-wide inclusive creative economy plans, and what considerations and preparations went into those plans.
      Hear how those plans are being pivoted or changed in response to COVID-19 and how creative economy practices must actively address systemic racism and embody anti-racism.  Learn about models and recommendations from creative economy practitioners, and how they are working in this moment to establish or leverage cross-sector partnerships to build an inclusive creative economy. 
    Speakers 

    Jessica Stern, Americans for the Arts 
    Cezanne Charles, roofoftwo
    Maryann Lombardi, Creative Affairs Office, Government of the District of Columbia 
    Erik Takeshita, ArtPlace America



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Cezanne Charles

    Partner, roofoftwo

    Cézanne Charles has more than 20 years of experience working at the executive and senior management level within the creative industries (nonprofit and for-profit) in both the United States and the United Kingdom. She is the co-founder and director of rootoftwo, a research and practice-driven hybrid design studio that engages in civic future-making, using design methods to facilitate people to imagine and shape collective visions of desirable futures that are more just, resilient, inclusive and adaptive. rootoftwo creates tangible artifacts, spaces, experiences, and strategies so we can better perceive ourselves, the here and now and the future differently.

    For the past 11 years, Cézanne served as Director of Creative Industries at Creative Many, where she led the design and implementation of the company’s creative industries research. Here, Cézanne also designed and directed programs that provided the knowledge, funding, networks and advocacy needed to help empower the practices of artists, designers and makers within the state, with a core focus on Detroit. Cézanne serves on the Stewardship Board for the UNESCO City of Design initiative, the Board of Directors of Allied Media Projects, the Downtown Detroit Partnership’s Creative Partnership Advisory Council, the Zoning Advisory Group of the Detroit Planning Commission and the Michigan Council of Arts & Cultural Affairs. She has a Master of Public Affairs (formerly public administration) from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan.

    Jessica Stern

    Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Jessica is the Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager with Americans for the Arts. Prior to this position, she acted as the Membership and Resources Manager for the Nonprofit Association of Oregon (NAO), providing oversight of NAO’s statewide membership program while curating and reinventing its online platform of nonprofit management best practice resources. Prior to NAO, Jessica spent nearly five years working with Portland’s local business committee for the arts, Business for Culture & the Arts (BCA), delivering programs that engaged employees from BCA’s 200+ business members, managing all marketing and communications strategies, and retaining and cultivating corporate and community partnerships. Jessica has also served in development roles at Metropolitan Youth Symphony and Literary Arts; and has freelanced as an independent web designer and developer.

    Maryann Lombardi

    Associate Director, Creative Affairs Office, Government of the District of Columbia, Office of Cable TV, Film, Music and Entertainment

    Working with an entrepreneurial approach, Maryann Lombardi has spent the past 20 years at the intersection of culture and commerce. She is the Chief Creative Economy Officer in Washington D.C. at the Office of Cable TV, Film, Music and Entertainment, where she is working to grow the local creative economy, strengthen the entrepreneurial ecosystem, and help freelancers and creative entrepreneurs reach their goals. She manages Mayor Muriel Bowser’s 202Creates creative economy brand and built the 202Creates portfolio of resources and programs for creative entrepreneurs.

      Previously she was the Executive Director of Lisner Auditorium and Partnership Development at The George Washington University, where she worked with her team to reorganize, rebuild and grow the organization. Previous, as the Director of Creative Economy for UMass Amherst, working with the City of Springfield and University administration, she established and implemented economic development and cultural activities to create jobs and improve downtown development in Springfield. Before moving to MA, she spent ten years in New York City as an independent theater producer producing Off Broadway and regional tours. Maryann has an undergraduate degree from The University of Michigan and graduate degree from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is a member of the Private Sector Network Council with Americans for the Arts, part of the National Mentor Network with Seed Spot, a DMV coalition member for Global Entrepreneurship Week 2019, and speaks regularly on workforce development, entrepreneurship, the freelance economy, and community building.

    Erik Takeshita

    Senior Fellow, ArtPlace America

    Erik Takeshita is passionate about advancing the role of art and culture in building stronger communities. Erik is currently a Senior Fellow at ArtPlace America. He previously served as Portfolio Director for Community Creativity at the Bush Foundation and Director of Creative Placemaking at the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC). Erik also ran an arts center in Honolulu, HI and served a Senior Policy Aide to the Mayor of the City Minneapolis. Erik was trained as a potter, holds a master’s degree from the Harvard Kennedy School and lives in Minneapolis with his wife and two daughters.

    www.artplaceamerica.org

    Twitter: @etakeshita

  • Collective Movement through Digital Collaboration Dancemaking

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    The only way we’re going to get through this is if we get through this together. This time calls for a collective, coordinated effort—one that can occur in your own community, in your state, or throughout the nation, or even in your next Zoom meeting. In this artistic session, dancer and movers (and Americans for the Arts staffers) Danielle Iwata and Ami Scherson explore the concept, challenges, and opportunities of collective movement by working with those assembled to create, culminating in a one-performance-only, Zoom-based collective digital dance performance with participants. Be a part of something special and inspiring, work those creative muscles, and create some art without leaving your chair!

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    1:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    The only way we’re going to get through this is if we get through this together. This time calls for a collective, coordinated effort—one that can occur in your own community, in your state, or throughout the nation, or even in your next Zoom meeting. In this artistic session, dancer and movers (and Americans for the Arts staffers) Danielle Iwata and Ami Scherson explore the concept, challenges, and opportunities of collective movement by working with those assembled to create, culminating in a one-performance-only, Zoom-based collective digital dance performance with participants. Be a part of something special and inspiring, work those creative muscles, and create some art without leaving your chair! 

    Learning Objectives
    • Explore the concept of collective movement through dancemaking.
    • Participate in a one-time-only dance performance.
    • Be inspired, work your creative muscles, and create some art without leaving your chair.
    Speakers 

    Danielle Iwata,  Americans for the Arts
    Ami Scherson,  Americans for the Arts



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Danielle Iwata

    Private Sector Initiatives Program Associate, Americans for the Arts

    Danielle Iwata (she/her/hers) joined Americans for the Arts as a Program Associate in 2018. As a member of the Private Sector Initiatives team, she focuses on business partnerships with the arts. She was previously the Development Coordinator and Board Liaison at Jacob’s Pillow Dance in Becket, MA; and has interned at Lar Lubovitch Dance Company and the National Museum of Dance. Danielle is committed to creating a more equitable field, which she serves through her role as Co-Chair of Dance/NYC’s Junior Committee. In addition to dancing, she continues to collaborate with other artists on photography projects. She holds a BA in History from Colgate University.

         

    Ami Scherson

    Equity in Arts Leadership Program Associate, Americans for the Arts

    AmiScherson (she/her/hers)is an arts administrator, musician, and self proclaimed "mover". Sheis fascinated by the intersections of social justice and the arts, and stronglybelieves in using creativity to create positive change. Ami works for Americansfor the Arts as the Equity in Arts Leadership Program Associate, creatingopportunities and initiatives to pursue cultural equity throughout the field.Prior to working at Americans for the Arts, she has interned at Kaufman MusicCenter, the Cleveland Orchestra, and Stuart's Opera House. She is passionateabout community development, and has pursued projects throughout urban,suburban, and rural regions of the United States. Most recently, she conductedresearch in Nelsonville, Ohio to understand the impact of nonprofit artsprogramming on rural Appalachian communities. She graduated from OhioUniversity's Honors Tutorial College with a B.A. in Music and a minor inBusiness. In addition to her work, Ami is a member of the Dance/NYC JuniorCommittee 2019-2020 Cohort. She is a proud Japanese-Chilean, and currentlylives in Queens, NY. 

  • Equity and Job Mobility in a Pandemic

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    What does a pandemic mean for the growth and career advancement of mid-career leaders of color in the arts field? Local, regional and national learning programs have identified a stellar roster of mid-career candidates who are successfully completing rigorous leadership development programs yet continue to be relegated to marginalizing roles. So, where do these mid-career leaders of color go when their talents are over looked because of the sector’s unwillingness to confront and dismantle biases—particularly now, when mobility has become hard and job searches have temporarily frozen?

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    1:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    What does a pandemic mean for the growth and career advancement of mid-career leaders of color in the arts field? Local, regional and national learning programs have identified a stellar roster of mid-career candidates who are successfully completing rigorous leadership development programs yet continue to be relegated to marginalizing roles.  So, where do these mid-career leaders of color go when their talents are over looked because of the sector’s unwillingness to confront and dismantle biases—particularly now, when mobility has become hard and job searches have temporarily frozen? 


    Learning Objectives
    • Hear insight on how the sector can address the challenges of mobility and growth inherent in this time of recovery--particularly for rising leaders of color.
    • Examine distinctions between “leader development” and “leadership development."
    • Talk through what we all can do to address systemic issues that are more visible now, but always present, and can discourage career advancement.

    Speakers 

    J. Gibran Villalobos, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
    Kavita Mahoney, City of Indianapolis
    Aseelah Shareef, Karamu House


    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Kavita Mahoney

    Manager, Garfield Park Art Center, City of Indianapolis

    Kavita Mahoney (she/her/hers) is the Arts Center Manager at the Garfield Park Arts Center (part
    of the City of Indianapolis and Indy Parks), where she collaborates with local artists and community organizations and serves on neighborhood committees to develop strategic partnerships to elevate the arts, particularly in traditionally underserved communities. She also curates exhibitions and public art initiatives in her community, including murals, festivals, and pop-up placemaking/placekeeping events that celebrate the multicultural fabric of the Indianapolis community. She has held positions at both local and national museums and art centers, including Newfields, Smithsonian Institution’s Freer|Sackler Museums of Asian Art, the Indiana State Museum, and the Indiana Historical Society. Kavita has a passion for elevating the arts in ways that benefit the public good, create a sense of community, connect to the environment, and stimulate awareness of social and cultural issues. She is committed to civic engagement and the advancement of the arts by providing creative ways to serve, educate, and collaborate with communities in order to provide diverse cultural experiences that are accessible for and inclusive of all audiences. Kavita holds a bachelor’s degree in Studio Art and History of Art and a master’s degree in Museum Studies from Indiana University, where she graduated with high honors and was selected as the Chancellor’s Scholar for her graduating class.

    J. Gibran Villalobos

    Assistant Curator of Contemporary and Civic Art, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

    J. Gibran Villalobos is Assistant Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. Previously he held posts as Partnerships and Community Engagement Manager for the Chicago Architecture Biennial and as well as a Cultural Liaison for the Chicago Park District. In 2016 he attended the Advocacy Leadership Institute and was invited to the White House Office of Public Engagement, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to speak to issues affecting Latinos in Chicago. In 2017 he launched an inaugural summit of Latinx artists and administrators across the U.S, for this project he was awarded the Act Up award by the Chicago Community Trust. In 2019 he was awarded the Field Foundation Leaders for a New Chicago Award as well as the Americans for the Arts Leaders of Color Fellowship. He is currently a Civic Leadership Academy Fellow at the University of Chicago Harris Public Policy School where he is working with government and nonprofit sector participants to think about effective policy for Chicago.  He serves on the Auxiliary Board for the National Museum of Mexican Art and  Chicago Artists Coalition Board of Directors.  He is a faculty lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Department of Arts Administration & Policy.

     

    Gibran holds a BA in Art History and a BS in Public Relations from Northern Arizona University and an MA in Arts Administration & Policy and MA in Modern Art History & Theory from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

    Aseelah Shareef

    Director of Operations + Community Engagement, Karamu House

    Aseelah Shareef offers a unique combination and understanding of inspirational leadership, operations and logistics, organizational programming and artistry, developed through intense non-profit environments demanding excellence, flexibility and the capacity to master multiple roles. Just a few of those roles include performing with Step Afrika!, the world’s only professional dance company dedicated to the art of stepping (body percussion), which toured nationally and internationally, and teaching and co-creating new curriculum for Dance at Cuyahoga Community College. Aseelah was the former executive director of Cleveland Contemporary Dance Theatre, Events Manager for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, and Director of Dance for Cleveland School of the Arts. Her most recent role is Director of Operations and Community Engagement at Karamu House, where she ensures operational efficiency across product lines and curates socially and culturally relevant programming for life-long learners. She is a member of the inaugural Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship sponsored by Americans for the Arts, The Joyce Foundation and American Express as well as an Ohio Citizens for the Arts board member and Trustee of Cleveland Arts Prize.  Aseelah holds an MA in Arts Administration and BS from Florida State University.  

  • Positioning Creatives to Drive Innovation in Reconstruction

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    In a crisis, systems that seemed rigid can suddenly bend--and if creative people are in the right place at the right time, they can transform those systems into better versions of themselves before they re-harden. In this session, hear how you can work to integrate artists and creatives in places where innovation is going to be necessary to survive, and where systems can benefit from a creative mind.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    1:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    In a crisis, systems that seemed rigid can suddenly bend--and if creative people are in the right place at the right time, they can transform those systems into better versions of themselves before they re-harden. In this session, hear how you can work to integrate artists and creatives in places where innovation is going to be necessary to survive, and where systems can benefit from a creative mind.

    Learning Objectives
    • Learn how artists can be integrated into non-arts public and private sector roles to drive innovation.
    • Hear what arguments work to help people understand that arts can be part of the solution.
    • Explore how this moment offers the opportunity of transformation, and how to seize that moment.
    Speakers 

    Kara Elliott-Ortega, City of Boston
    Renee Chatelain, Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    Renee Chatelain

    President and CEO, Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge

    Renee Chatelain holds a B.A. Degree and Juris Doctor from Louisiana State University. She is President/CEO of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge.  Renee began her career as a dancer, then served as a guest teacher for Iceland Dance Theater, Cornell University, among others.  She has been a speaker at the Women in Dance Conference at NYU and at the Ballet Festival of India, Mumbai. She serves on AFTA’s Private Sector Council.  


    Renee has been recognized by the Louisiana State Senate for her contribution to African Americans in Louisiana through the Arts.  She received the Milestone Award from the National Guild for Community Arts Education, and most recently, was named a Louisiana Role Model by the Links, Inc.


    Renee’s passion project is The Fading Line: A Commemoration of the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott, a multi-media dance interpretation of this under told historic event in her hometown.

    Kara Elliott-Ortega

    Chief of Arts & Culture, City of Boston

    Kara Elliott-Ortega is an urban planner and cultural organizer focusing on the role of arts and creativity in community development. Prior to becoming the Chief of Arts and Culture, she served as the Director of Policy and Planning for the Mayor's Office of Arts and Culture. Kara's work to implement Boston Creates, Boston’s 10-year cultural plan, includes creating new resources for local artists, developing a public art program, and supporting the development of cultural facilities. 


     Originally from Providence, Rhode Island, Kara received her bachelor’s from the University of Chicago and her Master in City Planning from MIT.

  • KEYNOTE: Using the Arts to Weave Communities Back Together

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    Join New York Times columnist and author David Brooks in exploring what it means to connect in this moment, and how the arts can be part of weaving us all back together. He’ll do this through the lens of Weave, a “cultural movement renewing America’s social fabric” that he has launched with the Aspen Institute which sets out to repair a social fabric that is badly frayed by distrust, division, and exclusion—and using arts and culture as a central strategy to doing just that. Following his speech, he will be joined on stage by Jessica Solomon, Vice President of the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, for a closing dialogue and Q&A.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    2:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Join New York Times columnist and author David Brooks in exploring what it means to connect in this moment, and how the arts can be part of weaving us all back together. He’ll do this through the lens of Weave, a “cultural movement renewing America’s social fabric” that he has launched with the Aspen Institute which sets out to repair a social fabric that is badly frayed by distrust, division, and exclusion—and using arts and culture as a central strategy to doing just that. Following his speech, he will be joined on stage by Jessica Solomon, Vice President of the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, for a closing dialogue and Q&A.

    Speakers 

    David Brooks, New York Times
    Jessica Solomon, Robert. W. Deutsch Foundation 



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference


    David Brooks

    Op-Ed Columnist, New York Times

    David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times and a contributor to The Atlantic, as well as Founder and Chair of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute. He is a commentator on “The PBS Newshour,” NPR’s “All Things Considered” and NBC’s “Meet the Press.” 

     

    His most recent book, “The Second Mountain,” shows what can happen when we put commitment-making and relationships at the center of our lives. He is also the author of “The Road to Character,” “Bobos In Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There” and “The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement.” 

     

    Mr. Brooks is on the faculty of Yale University and is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Follow him on Twitter @nytdavidbrooks and his Weave project @Weavetheppl

     

    Jessica Solomon

    Vice President, Robert W. Deutsch Foundation

    Jessica Solomon serves as Vice President of the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation. In her role she is sharpening the Foundation’s place-based grant making strategies, developing new programmatic initiatives, and deepening institutional knowledge to ensure equitable impact across Baltimore. Prior, Jessica led Art in Praxis - a cultural impact lab creating the conditions for increased capacity, creativity, and impact in cause driven organizations and cultural institutions. From 2014-2016 she served as “Chief Weaver of Social Fabric” at the US Department of Arts and Culture and in 2018 was Recognized by Baltimore Magazine as one of "30 Changemakers Shaping the Future of the City". She believes that storytelling is our best tool to increase empathy, adaptability, and spur transformation - in communities, organizations and systems.

     

    Jessica earned a Masters of Science in Organization Development from American University, where her graduate school cohort bestowed on her the Hal Kellner Award, presented to a class member whose characteristics include being “challenging, thoughtful, humorous…[and] someone who holds a deep concern about social justice.”

    Jessica is a member of RoadMap Consulting, a Salzburg Global Young Cultural Innovator, and Advisor to a host of organizations, including National Arts Strategies and Impact Hub Baltimore. She is a proud contributor to Animating Democracy’s Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change (2017) We Inspire Me: Cultivate Your Creative Crew to Work, Play, and Make by Andrea Pippins (Chronicle Books, 2018). 

     

  • Sing OUT: A Concert with the Gay Men's Chorus of Washington DC

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/25/2020

    Celebrate the power of music with a selection of pre-recorded performances from the Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, DC. With context from the artistic director and members of the Chorus to carry you through, enjoy a mini-concert from your own desk.

    Thursday, June 25, 2020
    3:30 p.m. EDT

    About this Session

    Celebrate the power of music with a selection of pre-recorded performances from the Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, DC. With context from the artistic director and members of the Chorus to carry you through, enjoy a mini-concert from your own desk.

    Learning Objectives
    • Celebrate the power of music to uplift. 
    • Hear some awesomely talented singers. 
    • Learn more about the Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, DC.
    Speakers 

    Concert by The Gay Men's Chorus of Washington, D.C.



    This session is a part of the 2020 Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference