AAE: Supporting Individual Artists Monthly Coffee Chats

Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.



This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.  

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  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Legal Support for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/29/2019

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Legal Support for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.


    Why exactly do artists need lawyers and legal support? 


    Join Adam Holofcener Esq., Executive Director of Maryland Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, for a discussion on how artists operate as a business and the types of situations they can find themselves in that have legal implications (both good and not so good).  Issues that artists generally encounter first involve copyright, contracts, and business entities. Artists do not need to become lawyers to practice their art in a fiscally/legally sustainable way, but they do need to know enough to know when to ask for help, as well as what resources are available that may be able to provide affordable help. 



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Creating a Marketplace for Emerging Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Creating a Marketplace for Emerging Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be about creating a marketplace for emerging artists.


    How can you support emerging artists by providing a platform to market and sell work? 


    Join Erik Culver and Alok Marwaha, Co-Founders of ArtStartArt, for a discussion on how to better support emerging artists. Erik and Alok will talk about what they've learned emerging artists need in terms of support and how that sparked their creation of ArtStartArt, an online marketplace for emerging artists and buyers. They will give an overview of their platform, discuss best practices with building an online marketplace for artists, and let you know what they've learned from both artists and buyers during their process. Be sure to bring your questions!



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Erik Culver

    Co-Founder, ArtStartArt

    Erik went to art school at the University of Texas and since graduating with a BFA in 2008, he has worked in marketing, advertising, and consulting and completed his MBA from the University of Texas in 2015. He thoroughly believes in the value of making art and still wishes he could spend all his time in the darkroom and painting studio.

    Website - https://www.artstartart.com/

    Instagram - @ArtStartArt

    Alok Marwaha

    Co-Founder, ArtStartArt

    Alok studied engineering at Georgia Tech, then completed his MBA from the University of Texas in 2015. He is interested in the intersection of art and technology, and relishes the opportunity to use the right side of his brain. At ArtStartArt, he is excited about the social enterprise aspect and hopes that it will be successful in strengthening art communities across the US.

    Website - https://www.artstartart.com/

    Instagram - @ArtStartArt

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Marketing Support for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/26/2019

    What skills do artists need to thrive in a crowded marketplace? Join us on 6/26 for a Coffee Chat with Ceylon Mitchell, marketing guru from @m3musician, as we discuss strategies to start, manage, and grow a business for individual artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat 

     Marketing Support for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for June 2019 will be about marketing support for artists.

    What marketing skills do artists need to thrive?

    Join Ceylon Mitchell, Musician and Owner/Director of M3 Music Media Marketing, LLC, as he discusses strategies to start, manage, and grow a business for an individual artist. Learn tips about how you can support musicians and other artists in their journey of growing their recognition and business.

    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Ceylon Mitchell II

    Owner and Director, M3 Music Media Marketing

    Ceylon Narvelle Mitchell II is a professional flutist, arts entrepreneur, educator, and arts advocate in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. Originally from Anchorage, Alaska and a graduate of East Anchorage High School, he earned a Master of Music Education degree from Boston University and a Master of Music Performance degree from the University of Maryland, in addition to a Graduate Certificate in Multimedia Journalism. Ceylon will continue his education in the Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) flute program at the University of Maryland in Fall 2019. Recent achievements include the National Music Festival Symphony Orchestra, the Young Alaskan Artist Award, a 2018 Prince George’s County Forty UNDER 40 Award in Arts & Humanities, and a 2019 Prince George’s Arts and Humanities Council Artist Fellowship Grant. Ceylon’s mission is keeping classical music alive, authentic, and accessible.

    An active freelance artist, Ceylon is the co-founder, flutist, and media manager of Potomac Winds, a chamber music collective. Described by the University of Maryland as “magnificent, deeply moving, and a model of alumni pride,” the ensemble is committed to promoting woodwind chamber music as a virtuosic medium through engaging performances of the highest level of artistic expression. As a music educator, Ceylon maintains a private studio in Maryland and serves as the Potomac Valley Youth Orchestra flute choir conductor. He previously served as a teaching artist with the Boston Flute Academy and as the director of the Boston University Flute Ensemble. Ceylon supports performing artists and arts organizations with digital media production and marketing consulting as the owner and founder of M3 Music Media Marketing, LLC, a multimedia organization. Tailored services include photography, videography, and social media marketing. Recent clients include The Clarice, the Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County, the Boulanger Initiative, Capitol Hill Jazz Foundation, the Anchorage Festival of Music, and numerous individual artists. Ceylon seeks to equip and empower his fellow performing artists for artistic and marketing success in a 21st-century landscape. Ceylon is also an active arts advocate in the D.C. area, serving as a board member of the Arts Administrators of Color Network and an Emerging Arts Advocates (EAA) member of Maryland Citizens for the Arts.

    Mentors, past and present, include Dr. Saïs Kamalidiin, Ms. Janese Sampson, Professor Leah Arsenault, Dr. William Montgomery, Professor Linda Toote, Dr. Carmen Lemoine, and Sharon Nowak of Anchorage, Alaska, his first flute teacher. Additionally, Ceylon has performed in masterclasses for professional flutists such as Aaron Goldman, Marina Piccinini, Sir James Galway, Paul Edmund-Davies, Trevor Wye, and Marianne Gedigian. He remains grateful to the entire Anchorage music community for preparing him for a promising career in the arts with encouragement and inspiration. Ceylon currently resides in Bladensburg, Maryland with his wife, Denys Symonette Mitchell.

    Twitter: @ceylonmitchell and @m3musician

    Website:  www.ceylonmitchell.com and www.m3musicmedia.com

    Cristyn Johnson (Moderator)

    Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Cristyn Johnson is the Local Arts Advancement Program Manager at Americans for the Arts. In this capacity, she develops Americans for the Arts’ comprehensive full-career-spectrum field education offerings to advance competent and informed local, regional and national arts professionals.  She also develops a suite of programs and resources centered around the full leadership pipeline and organizational needs of a diverse workforce. She manages, grows, and cultivates an Emerging Leaders Network, a Mid-Career Leaders Network, and an Executive Leaders Network by building a connected network of arts professionals in the field of practices, who can share their knowledge with the field at large.        

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Supporting Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for May 2019 will be about supporting artists as entrepreneurs.

    What skills do artists need to thrive as entrepreneurs?

    Join James Hart, Director of Arts Entrepreneurship and Professor of Practice with Southern Methodist University, Meadows School of the Arts as we discuss what Arts Entrepreneurship is, why students and early career artists need to think about their profession in this way, and how to support artists on their journey of becoming an Arts Entrepreneur. Be sure to bring your questions!



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Supporting Artists with Disabilities

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/06/2019

    What do knowledge and resources do arts administrators need to support artists with disabilities? Join us on 8/6 for a Coffee Chat with Judith Smith, Founder and Director Emerita of AXIS Dance Company, as she discusses strategies for your organization to ready itself to be more inclusive to people with disabilities.

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    About this Conversation

    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Supporting Artists with Disabilities

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about supporting artists with disabilities.

    How can you support artists with disabilities?

    Join Judith Smith, Founder and Director Emerita of AXIS Dance Company, as she discusses strategies for your organization to ready itself to be more inclusive to people with disabilities; how you can support disabled artists in your programming and hiring processes; as well as what resources are available to support disabled artists. 


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Judith Smith

    Founding Member and Artistic Director Emerita, AXIS Dance Company

    Judith Smith, Founding Member and Artistic Director Emerita of AXIS Dance Company, is one of the world’s driving forces in physically integrated dance. She was born and raised in the mountains of Colorado. Prior to becoming disabled in a car accident at age 17 in 1977, Judith was a champion equestrian. She transferred her passion for riding to dance after discovering contact improvisation in 1983. Judith helped launch AXIS in 1987 and she grew the Company to be the nation’s leading physically integrated dance ensemble. She has left an amazing legacy and vision for the future of AXIS and integrated dance.

    Her advocacy and equity work led to the first-ever National Convening on the Future of Physically Integrated Dance in the USA, followed by six regional town halls throughout the country in 2016. This project, supported by the prestigious Doris Duke Charitable Foundation National Project Program, culminated in an extensive report and the launch of the AXIS Artistic Advancement Platform to Advance Artistry, Opportunity and Equity for Dancers with Disabilities. She has been instrumental in the creation of the Dance/USA Disability and Dance Affinity Group and co-chairs the group.

    Judith is currently working as an independent consultant in dance and disability. She is an activist for the environment, animals and people with disabilities. She gardens for pollinators, birdwatches, raises butterflies and is involved in thoroughbred racehorse rescue and adaptive carriage driving.

    Website: http://www.axisdance.org/advocacy

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Creating a Retreat Style Experience for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/19/2019

    What do you need to think about when considering building retreat-style experiences for artists? This Coffee Chat with Lindsay Gates, Executive Director of Touchstone Center for Crafts​, discusses the many configurations of artistic retreats and spaces, the unexpected benefits of such experiences for both artists and organizations, the realized benefits that professional and emerging artists experience, and more.

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    About this Conversation

    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Creating a Retreat Style Experience for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for August 2019 will be about creating retreat-style experiences for individual artists.

    What do you need to know to create a retreat-style experience for artists?

    Lindsay Gates, Executive Director of Touchstone Center for Crafts, discusses the many configurations of artistic retreats and spaces, the unexpected benefits of such experiences for both artists and organizations, the realized benefits that professional and emerging artists experience, and more. 


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Lindsay Ketterer Gates

    Executive Director, Touchstone Center for Crafts

    Lindsay has an undergraduate degree in Fine Arts (1996), a graduate certificate in Non Profit Management/Arts Administration (2002) and a Masters of Business Administration (2018). She was employed as the Director of Development at Peters Valley School of Craft for many years before taking on the role of Executive Director at Touchstone Center for Crafts in May of 2018. Lindsay is the Vice President of the board of directors of the National Basketry Organization and helps to lead their development efforts. For over 20 years she has been a studio artist whose work is in the permanent collection of the American Embassy in the Republic of Djibouti, The Museum of Art and Design in NYC, Yale University Art Gallery as well as other international collections. She has work on tour in the exhibition ‘Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in the 21st Century’ and recently had work on loan in the American Embassy in Bandar Seri Begawan and ‘Innovators and Legends; Generations in Textiles and Fibers”. She is sought to teach and lecture nationally and has spoken and taught at the Smithsonian's American Craft Museum – Renwick Gallery, St. Louis Art Museum, Textile Study Group of NY, Haystack Mt. School of Craft, Penland School of Crafts, Arrowmont School of Craft, Peters Valley School of Craft, SOFA Chicago, and the Fiber Arts Guild of Pittsburgh. Lindsay’s work has been featured on the cover of Metalsmith Magazine and on the pages of American Craft Magazine, FiberArts, Fiber Art Now, Surface Design Journal, Shuttle, Spindle and Dyepot Magazine, FIBERARTS Design Book VII, 500 Baskets, Making Good: An Inspirational Guide to being an Artist/Craftsmen, to name a few. In 2005 she was awarded an Individual Creative Artists Fellowship by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, administered by the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation. 

    Website: https://touchstonecrafts.org/

    Twitter: @touchstonecraft

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Disaster Support for Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/26/2019

    What types of disaster support do artists need in order to ensure they continue to thrive? Join us on September 26 at 2:00PM EDT for a conversation with Carrie Cleveland from CERF+ as we talk about the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies and how we can work together to build an artist’s safety net.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for September 2019 will be about disaster support for individual artists.

    What types of disaster support do artists need to thrive?

    Join Carrie Cleveland, Education + Outreach Manager with CERF+, for a conversation about disaster support for artists. Carrie will talk about wow CERF+ has  expanded its work from emergency relief to include serving artists BEFORE emergencies and the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies; building the artists safety net: how we can work together to keep artists working; what resources CERF+ has available to support artists in your community.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Carrie Cleveland

    Education + Outreach Manager, CERF+

    Carrie Cleveland is the Education + Outreach Manager at CERF+ where she has held various other positions since 2008. During this time, she has participated in all aspects of the organization’s work to help artists have resilient careers, from counseling artists seeking emergency assistance to spearheading $100,000 fundraising appeals to teaching emergency preparedness workshops across the United States and territories. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history, with extensive work in the visual arts, from Marlboro College and prior to her time at CERF+ she spent several years living in New York City where she was an entomologist’s assistant by day and a tenor saxophone player by night. Carrie’s work stems from a drive to empower people to have agency in their careers and lives, and to help remove barriers to access. In addition to her work at CERF+, Carrie is a student of Facilitated Communication, an alternative communication method to support people with disabilities; and she is also a beginning metalsmith.

    Website: www.cerfplus.org

    Twitter: @cerfplus

    Facebook: facebook.com/cerfplus

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Artist Portfolios

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/04/2019

    Building a strong artist portfolio is important as it stands as a reflection of work and artistic point of view. Join us for a virtual conversation with Adia Morris Swanger from Springboard for the Arts as we explore what an artist portfolio is and learn what artists should consider when building their own portfolios.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about artist portfolios.

    What do artists need to consider when building their portfolios?

    Join Adia Morris Swanger, Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, as she discusses why artists need to have a portfolio, what should be included, and how artists should consider what they will include.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    ​Adia Morris Swanger

    Professional Development & Operations Coordinator, Springboard for the Arts

    Adia Morris Swanger is Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, where she oversees the Artist Career Consultant roster, teaches business skills workshops for artists, and connects artists to funding opportunities with the Incubator Fiscal Sponsorship program. Adia is also a freelance theatre artist, writer, and educator based in St. Paul, MN. She also appears on Twin Cities Public Television's Almanac and was the host of  TPT's TV Takeover for Seasons 1 and 2. 

    Website: www.springboardforthearts.org

    Twitter: @longtallsallie

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Crafting an Artist Statement

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/25/2019

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for November 2019 will be about crafting an artist statement.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about artist portfolios.

    How can artists create statements to set them apart?

    Join Naomi RaMona Schliesman, Artist Development Director for rural programming for Springboard for the Arts’ Fergus Falls, MN office, as she discusses the who, what, and why of crafting an artist statement, as well as how artists can sharpen the best description of who they are. 

    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Naomi RaMona Schliesman

    Artist Development Director, Springboard for the Arts'

    Naomi RaMona Schliesman is the Artist Development Director for rural programing for Springboard for the Arts’ Fergus Falls, MN office, where she leads the Hinge Arts at the Kirkbride residency program and teaches the Work of Art: Business Skills for Artists workshops. Naomi grew up in Fergus Falls, MN. She has her BFA with an emphasis in sculpture from Minnesota State University Moorhead and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Schliesman has received a Fellowship from Ragdale and Kimmel Hardening Nelson Center for the Arts, was awarded 2nd place for Miami University Young Sculptors Competition for William and Dorothy Yeck Award, and was a LEAP finalist for Society of Contemporary Craft Award. She has traveled abroad to Italy, Scotland, Ireland, France, United Kingdom and Belize to study art and has done artist residencies at Vermont Studio Center, Kimmel Hardening Nelson Center for the arts, Ragadale and Hospitalfield Arts. Schliesman serves on the Public Arts Commission for The City of Fergus Falls and is also a board member for the Fergus Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau, and recently joined the Fergus Falls Childcare Collective. She continues her own studio practice in Visual and Performing Arts and has shown nationally. Schliesman is a single parent to a 3-year old and knows firsthand the struggles of childcare shortage and managing her time as a full-time mom, artist and full-time professional.

    Website: www.springboardforthearts.org

    Twitter: @SpringboardArts

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Activating Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 12/09/2019 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for December 2019 will be about activating artists in community.

    imageAbout this Conversation

    December 9, 2019 at 2:00PM EDT

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about activating artists.

    How can you activate artists in your local community?

    Join Edwige Charlot, Providence, RI based artist and strategist, as she discusses activating artists. This conversation will discuss:

    • Activation through Connection - How do we bridge the gap within our creative communities?
    • Activation as Support - What is needed and desired by your arts community and your creative professionals?
    • Activation as Propellent--- How are you connecting the dots to the communities at large, the communities across sectors and discipline?


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Edwige Charlot

    Providence, RI based artist and strategist

    Edwige Charlot is the Community Membership Manager at AS220 Industries (Providence, Rhode Island). In her role, she facilities access to affordable, project-based, experiential learning in digital fabrication, printmaking and media arts. Edwige has worked in the social profit sector over the past decade and her previous roles at the Maine College of Art, Creative Portland, Engine both in Maine. Her community engagement and service include being a founding member of the Portland Global Shapers, an initiative of the World Economic Forum; an advisor of the People of Color Fund at the Maine Community Foundation; and the Artist Thrive initiative at the Tremaine Foundation. She earned her BFA in Printmaking from the Maine College of Art. 

    Website: industries.as220.org