DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series

About this series

The DIAL.studio six-part professional development series was created to support college students and emerging leaders who want to increase their knowledge of arts administration through a cultural equity lens. This series will be hosted through the Diversity in Arts Leadership (DIAL) program, a summer internship specifically for undergraduate students traditionally underrepresented in the arts management field. As the program shifted from an in-person internship to a virtual experience, coordinators of DIAL wanted to open up the valuable content and information out to the field. 

As named, the “studio” will allow participants to gain new knowledge from arts leaders, peers, and colleagues, while creating space to practice their own skills and encourage creative thought.

Participants of this series will:

  • Engage college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders in conversations about diversityequityinclusion, and belonging in the arts field
  • Provide opportunities for diverse future arts leaders to gain a better understanding of how to navigate and succeed in the arts field.
  • Support arts administrators from historically and currently underrepresented communities in accessing professional development programming with practical tools to help advance their career pathways 
  • Create space for participants to learn more about the field through discussions with artists, arts administrators, and community organizers whose focuses lay in cultural equity.

This program is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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  • DIAL.studio | Utilizing Community to Achieve Creative Revitalization

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/31/2020 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    ThirdSpace Action Lab is a POC-led organization created to disrupt the vicious cycle of disinvestment and displacement that negatively impacts the vitality of low-income communities of color, specifically in the Cleveland Metro Area. It is a grassroots research, strategy, and design cooperative, dedicated to prototyping creative place-based solutions to complex socioeconomic problems. ThirdSpace has centered their work in racial equity and inclusion, and work to involve the community in the revitalization process. They are key contributors to the development of the Glenville Arts Campus, and aim to provide spaces for communities of color to unify and take action. This session will highlight the importance of community building and activation and allow participants to explore the various aspects of this work and where it can be utilized in their own regions.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    July 31, 2020 at 3:00 PM EST

    ThirdSpace Action Lab is a POC-led organization created to disrupt the vicious cycle of disinvestment and displacement that negatively impacts the vitality of low-income communities of color, specifically in the Cleveland Metro Area. It is a grassroots research, strategy, and design cooperative, dedicated to prototyping creative place-based solutions to complex socioeconomic problems. ThirdSpace has centered their work in racial equity and inclusion, and work to involve the community in the revitalization process. They are key contributors to the development of the Glenville Arts Campus, and aim to provide spaces for communities of color to unify and take action. This session will highlight the importance of community building and activation and allow participants to explore the various aspects of this work and where it can be utilized in their own regions.

    Participants will learn about:

    • An example of how a POC-led institution can make tangible change within its community
    • Insight into how organizations and organizers can use creative thinking strategies to uplift and heal their communities
    • Understanding the challenges that arise when working to revitalize a community that is on its pathway to gentrification

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Evelyn Burnett

    Co-founder and Partner, ThirdSpace Action Lab

    Evelyn Burnett is a co-founder and partner of the ThirdSpace Action Lab and Third Space Café. Prior to this exciting venture, Evelyn served as Vice President, Economic Opportunity at Cleveland Neighborhood Progress an intermediary whose mission is to foster communities of choice and opportunity throughout Cleveland. Prior to joining CNP, Evelyn served as Associate Director for Program Strategies with Admiral Center at Living Cities, project director in the city of Cleveland’s Office of Sustainability, and as a 2007-2008 Cleveland Executive (Coro) Fellow. Evelyn is a 2018 German Marshall Fellow and sits on the board of several organizations throughout Northeast Ohio and nationally including ioby (In Our Back Yards), Credit Builders Alliance, Teach for America, Birthing Beautiful Communities, Dance Cleveland, Walsh University School of Business and CTMDreams. Evelyn holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business and Organizational Communications & Public Relations with a double minor in Sales & Marketing and Dance from The University of Akron during which time she studied abroad in Ghana, Africa; and a master’s degree in Public Administration from The University of Akron.

    Website: https://3rdspaceactionlab.co/

    Twitter: @evburnett

    Mordecai Cargill

    Co-founder and Partner, ThirdSpace Action Lab

    Mordecai Cargill is a co-founder and partner of the ThirdSpace Action Lab and Third Space Café.  Prior to starting this exciting venture, Mordecai served as the Director of Strategy, Research & Impact at Cleveland Neighborhood Progress (CNP), a community development funding intermediary committed to fostering inclusive neighborhoods of choice and opportunity throughout the city of Cleveland. Mordecai provides oversight and analysis for the implementation of the Cleveland Neighborhood Progress 2017-2021 Strategic Plan, focused primarily on 3 key areas of activity: Program Design and Evaluation; Research and Thought Leadership; and Partnership and Resource Development. Since joining Team CNP in 2014 as Manager of Fund Development, Mordecai’s responsibilities have included project management for strategic initiatives such as an Organizational Assessment (2014), and the planning process for the 2017-2021 Cleveland Neighborhood Progress Strategic Plan (2016). He also contributes to CNP’s emerging Policy, Advocacy & Research body of work, and co-leads the organization’s efforts to elevate racial equity and inclusion as a citywide community development priority. Mordecai earned his BA in African American Studies from Yale University, with a concentration on Black Culture in the 20th Century. He was awarded the William Pickens Prize for his Senior Thesis entitled, “The Black Arts Iconography of John Coltrane

    Websitehttps://3rdspaceactionlab.co/

    Twitter: @MCargill28

  • DIAL.studio | Self Advocacy and Self Care for Artists and Arts Administrators of Color

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/24/2020 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    For many pre-career and emerging leaders of color, there is constant pressure to prove oneself, focus on the product rather than process, and “fit in” to a culture that may not be their own. Many struggle with creating space for themselves, feeling comfortable advocating for their wants and needs, and supporting their own communities. This session explores the topic of self-care and self-advocacy through a panel discussion with music educator and consultant, Calida Jones, and New York City Ballet principal dancer, Georgina Pazcoguin. Through this discussion, participants will explore Calida’s and Georgina’s pathways towards success and growth, and how their groundbreaking stories inspire the people around them.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    July 24, 2020 at 3:00 PM EST

    For many pre-career and emerging leaders of color, there is constant pressure to prove oneself, focus on the product rather than process, and “fit in” to a culture that may not be their own. Many struggle with creating space for themselves, feeling comfortable advocating for their wants and needs, and supporting their own communities. This session explores the topic of self-care and self-advocacy through a panel discussion with music educator and consultant, Calida Jones, and New York City Ballet principal dancer, Georgina Pazcoguin. Through this discussion, participants will explore Calida’s and Georgina’s pathways towards success and growth, and how their groundbreaking stories inspire the people around them.

    Participants will walk away with:

    • Insight into how to advocate for oneself as a member of the non-dominant group within the arts field
    • Tools on how to navigate white-led institutions and find community as an emerging and/or prospective arts leader of color
    • Critical discussion topics on how participants can create change within their environments, communities, and organizations.

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Calida Jones

    Assistant Director of Education and Engagement, Hartt School

    Calida Jones began studying the piano at the age of 3 while attending Nursery School, and switched to violin at the age of 6 when she entered Thomas G. Pullen Performing Arts School in Landover, Maryland. Currently, Calida is the Assistant Director of Education & Engagement at University of Hartford’s The Hartt School. She also serves as Program Director for Music Matters, and the Conductor of the Hartford All-City Youth Orchestra in conjunction with the Charter Oak Culture Center. Prior to those roles, Calida was appointed Director of Development and Advocacy for the El Sistema inspired program PROJECT MUSIC from 2018-2019. In 2012, Calida was hired by the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra to design and implement the El Sistema inspired program “Bravo Waterbury!” (Bravo). She continued her work in Waterbury until August of 2018. She continues to consult with organizations all over the country. An accomplished musician, social justice advocate and educator, Calida’s work has taken her all over the world teaching and performing. Calida is passionate about intentional purposeful teaching and community engagement. Her personal mission is to ensure that children who have limited resources also have access to musical opportunities and activities. She knows that this type of musical exposure and education will benefit them and build their confidence which will catapult them to successful careers, regardless of the career path. She is committed to correlating the art of teaching to life skills, and community building. Calida has had the privilege of speaking multiple times at the prestigious Yale School of Music, Duke University, Ravinia, The Connecticut State Capitol, The Hartt School of Music, and was a Tedx speaker in San Jose, CA. Most recently, Calida has consulted with Sphinx Organization, The Cleveland Orchestra, The Utah Cultural Alliance, and a host of other organizations. A graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania (Bachelors of Fine Arts in Violin Performance), she received her Masters in Violin Performance and Suzuki Pedagogy from The Hartt School of Music. Calida is honored and humbled to have received awards, and honors during her career including a scholar fellowship at the Aspen Festival of Ideas, The Elizabeth Mahaffey Fellowship, a Grammy nomination for the Music Educator Excellence Award, the Father Thomas H. Dwyer Humanitarian Award for her work in Waterbury, Connecticut, and the 2018 CT Arts Hero Award in Waterbury CT. Calida serves on the Board of The Hartt School of Music, El Sistema USA (Board Clerk), and chairs the Racial Diversity and Cultural Understanding Committee; she also serves on the board of the Connecticut Arts Alliance.

    Website: www.cnjassociates.com

    Georgina Pazcoguin

    Principal Dancer, New York City Ballet

    Co-founder of diversity initiative “Final Bow For Yellowface” Georgina "The Rogue Ballerina" is breaking glass ceilings in the world of Ballet. Celebrating a 18 year career with world renown New York City Ballet, she aims to be named the company's first female Asian American Principal dancer. A steadily rising star, she is an ambassador of her art form across the platforms of Ballet, Broadway, and Film. Known as the "The Rogue Ballerina" she empowers those not fitting the "balletic ideal stereotype" with her story of success and rise through the ranks of NYCB. She most recently can be seen on stage at David H. Koch Theater and on TV in the hit Fosse/Verdon tv series. In addition to her many credits including award winning film “New York Export Opus Jazz”, Ivy in the revival of “On the Town” and originating the role of Victoria in the 2016 revival of “Cats”, Georgina is a passionate activist for foundations Orphan Starfish, Arteamor, using ballet as a universal language tool raising awareness and impacting social change.

    Website: GeorginaPazcoguin.com     

    Instagram: @Georgina_Pazco

  • DIAL.studio | Antigone in Ferguson: Building a Chorus that Can’t Preach to Itself (By Design)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/17/2020 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    Antigone in Ferguson was conceived in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in 2014, through a collaboration between Theater of War Productions and community members from Ferguson, MO. Translated and directed by Theater of War Productions Artistic Director Bryan Doerries and composed by Phil Woodmore, the project fuses a dramatic reading by leading actors of excerpts from Sophocles’ Greek tragedy with live choral music performed by a choir of activists, police officers, youth, and concerned citizens from Ferguson and New York City. Through their work with Antigone in Ferguson, Bryan and Phil will discuss how this performance became a catalyst for panel and audience-driven discussions about racialized violence, structural oppression, misogyny, gender violence, and social justice.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    July 17th, 2020 at 3:00 PM EST

    Antigone in Ferguson was conceived in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in 2014, through a collaboration between Theater of War Productions and community members from Ferguson, MO. Translated and directed by Theater of War Productions Artistic Director Bryan Doerries and composed by Phil Woodmore, the project fuses a dramatic reading by leading actors of excerpts from Sophocles’ Greek tragedy with live choral music performed by a choir of activists, police officers, youth, and concerned citizens from Ferguson and New York City. Through their work with Antigone in Ferguson, Bryan and Phil will discuss how this performance became a catalyst for panel and audience-driven discussions about racialized violence, structural oppression, misogyny, gender violence, and social justice.

    Participants will walk away with:

    • An understanding of the process behind creating and building the play, Antigone in Ferguson
    • Insight on how artists and communities can work together to develop art that emphasizes the need for critical discussion, organizing, and healing 
    • Tools on how one can create social justice centered artwork within their own communities

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Bryan Doerries

    Artistic Director, Theater of War Productions

    Bryan Doerries is a New York-based writer, director, and translator, who currently serves as Artistic Director of Theater of War Productions. A self-described evangelist for ancient stories and their relevance to our lives today, Doerries uses age-old approaches to help individuals and communities heal from trauma and loss. During his tenure at Theater of War Productions, the company has presented diverse projects across the United States and internationally, using dramatic readings of seminal plays and community conversations to confront topics such as combat-related psychological injury, end-of-life care, racialized violence, prison reform, gun violence, domestic violence, addiction, sexual assault,  and the refugee crisis. Doerries’ books include The Theater of War: What Ancient Greek Tragedies Can Teach Us Today (Knopf), The Odyssey of Sergeant Jack Brennan (Pantheon), and a collection of his translations of ancient Greek Tragedies entitled All That You’ve Seen Here is God (Vintage). He has taught courses at Princeton University, Bard College, the University of Connecticut, and the Bard Prison Initiative. His academic degrees include a BA in Classics from Kenyon College and an MFA in Theater Directing from the University of California, Irvine. Among his awards, he has received an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Kenyon College, and in March 2017, he was named Public Artist in Residence (PAIR) for the City of New York, a joint appointment with the New York City Department of Veterans’ Services and Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information about his work, please visit: www.theaterofwar.com.

    Facebook: Theater of War

    Twitter: @theaterofwar

    Instagram: @theaterofwar

    Phil Woodmore

    Composer, Vocal Coach, and Music Educator

    Saint Louis native, Dr. Philip A. Woodmore has been an active member of the St. Louis music community for many years. Phil received his bachelors from Saint Louis University in Business Marketing and Music Vocal Performance and then went on to receive his masters from Webster University in Music Education.  He recently graduating with his PhD in Music Education from the University of Missouri-Columbia. His research interest are the changing voice and voice pedagogy and his dissertation is on the transformative power of music in the choral setting using the auditioned choir in the Off-Broadway run of Antigone in Ferguson.   

    Phil taught choir one year at Ferguson and Berkley Middle Schools in the Ferguson-Florissant School District and then went on to become the choir director at Crestview Middle School in the Rockwood School District where he taught for 12 years.  Along with his work in Rockwood, Phil was the Coordinator of the Voice Program at the Center of Creative Arts (COCA) and the artist director of the Allegro Music Company from 2008-2017, has been the director of the Saint Louis Metropolitan Police Department Choir since 2009,  was the director of the Northern Arizona University Gospel Choir from 2014-2017, Artist in Residency for the State of Arizona for a two year term 2016-2018, minister of music at Trinity Community Church from 1992-2018, and vocal coach to many in the St. Louis and New York.

    In August 2016 Phil was asked to compose an original score of a version of Antigone translated by Bryan Doerries called Antigone in Ferguson which has been traveling the country for the past four years and premiered internationally in Athens, Greece in June 2016. Since the success of Antigone in Ferguson, Phil has written an original score for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s last sermon The Drum Major Instinct and also for a speech by Frederick Douglass.  In 2018 The Drum Major Instinct premiered in Athens, Greece and was performed on several college campuses during the 2018-2019 school year. In 2018 Antigone in Ferguson ran in an Off-Broadway theater in New York for a five-week workshop and in 2019 it ran for ten-weeks at the St. Ann and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Brooklyn, New York. Philip is excited for several collaborations in 2021 including a production of Pirates of Penzance in which Phil’s company P. Woodmore Music, LLC will be a producing partner and will provide all the music for the show.  Phil will be joining the Muny family for the 2020 summer season and he is looking forward to a great partnership as the Music Director for Muny Kids. For more information on Dr. Philip A. Woodmore please visit www.philipawoodmore.com

    Twitter: @phil_woodmore

    Antigone in Ferguson is a groundbreaking project, developed by Theater of War Productions, which fuses dramatic readings by acclaimed actors of Sophocles’ Antigone with live choral music performed by a diverse choir, including police officers, activists, youth, teachers, and concerned citizens from St. Louis, Missouri and New York City, culminating in powerful, healing discussions about race and social justice. Antigone in Ferguson was conceived in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in 2014, through a collaboration between Theater of War Productions and community members from Ferguson, MO, and premiered at Normandy High School, Michael Brown’s alma mater, in September of 2016.

    Click here to view the performance

  • DIAL.studio | Arts Administration 101: The History of Arts Management & Arts Organizations in America

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/10/2020 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    Aimed at expanding the knowledgebase of pre-career college students, this session will give participants a “101” education on the history of arts administration and organizations. Led by Margie Johnson Reese, an expert in arts management, art policy, cultural organizing, and other relevant topics, this session is a great introduction for those who want extra knowledge about the arts field.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    July 10th, 2020 at 3:00 PM EST

    Aimed at expanding the knowledgebase of pre-career college students, this session will give participants a “101” education on the history of arts administration and organizations. Led by Margie Johnson Reese, an expert in arts management, art policy, cultural organizing, and other relevant topics, this session is a great introduction for those who want extra knowledge about the arts field

    Participants will walk away with:

    • Knowledge about the basic history and creation of arts management and arts organizations in the United States
    • Best practices of navigating the arts field as early career administrators

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Margie Johnson Reese

    Consultant and Professor

    Margie Johnson Reese has a 30-year portfolio as an arts management professional and has contributed to public policy in areas of public participation in the arts, public art policy and practice, community development, and cultural master planning and her career has included arts leadership in Dallas and Los Angeles.  She has been an advisor to the nation’s most diverse communities. She has worked directly with artists and other creative professionals to enhance their employment and business opportunities, in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors. She has guided the development of numerous cultural facilities and managing architectural design, budget and staff to guarantee that pubic service is a priority.

    She served as a grant maker for the Ford Foundation in their Office for West Africa as the Program Officer for Media, Arts and Culture. In that capacity, she cites among her major accomplishments funding the restoration of the slave castles in Ghana and Nigeria and providing funding to preserve the ancient Arabic manuscripts of Timbuktu in Mali.

    Margie formed MJR Partners, LLC in 2010, and provides professional arts management services and guidance to communities for planning, stabilizing and implementing inclusive public policy. Her clients have engaged her services to assist in stimulating strategic partnerships between the cultural sector and government agencies, foundations, corporations, and academic institutions to advance cultural understanding. She is a professor at Goucher College in Towson, Maryland, teaching Cultural Policy in the Arts in the graduate Arts Administration program. A graduate of Washington State University in Pullman, Washington with a BS in Speech and Theater, Margie holds an MFA in Theater from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    Website: http://www.margiejohnsonreese.com/

  • DIAL.studio | Creating Online POC Arts Communities

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/12/2020

    Miguel Maltos Gonzales launched an online arts community, LTNX Artes, to create a space for artists of color to share their work, access support from an online network, and surmount the lack of physical places for POC in their areas to showcase their work. This session will highlight Miguel’s journey in creating POC-centered online communities throughout his life and his story as a Chicano artist now living in Spokane, WA. In this conversation, he will outline best practices for artists and administrators to use technology as a way of sharing art, creating affinity spaces, and meeting new thought partners and creators.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    Miguel Maltos Gonzales launched an online arts community, LTNX Artes, to create a space for artists of color to share their work, access support from an online network, and surmount the lack of physical places for POC in their areas to showcase their work. This session will highlight Miguel’s journey in creating POC-centered online communities throughout his life and his story as a Chicano artist now living in Spokane, WA. In this conversation, he will outline best practices for artists and administrators to use technology as a way of sharing art, creating affinity spaces, and meeting new thought partners and creators

    Participants will walk away with:

    • An understanding of the challenges POC artists face in navigating white spaces to show their art
    • Insight into how an artist of color can use technology and online spaces to develop community and connect with other POC artists
    • Tips and tools for utilizing web-based community spaces to preserve heritage, share history, and find alternative and creative solutions for showcasing artwork during this COVID-19 era

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Miguel Maltos Gonzalez

    Chicano Artists and Founder of LTNX Artes

    Miguel (he/him; el/ello) is an American born artist living in Spokane, WA born in San Antonio, TX. He’s a Chicano photographer documenting the surreal lifestyle of being bicultural a predominantly monocultural world.

     Miguel has been exploring biculturalism in art since he was introduced to Chicano art as a child, he was mentored by Chicano artists from central and southern Texas, founded The Community Darkroom project to promote film photography, and created photographic formula processes exclusive to his pop color print style. In the early nineties, Miguel started The Community Darkroom as a place to keep film photography alive when digital was becoming more accessible. This grew into a strong following in San Antonio as an annual Photography event, and now starting LTNX artes to document and develop Latinx art and culture in the Pacific Northwest. Nationally, Miguel is a member of the Cousins Regime of Art Administrators of Color, National Association for Latino Arts and Culture, U.S. Latinx Art Forum, in Washington he is a member of the Hispanic Business Professionals Association, and Spokane Independent Metro Business Association. Miguel is currently a commissioner with Spokane Arts, and a board member with Arts administrators of Color.

    Being bicultural means living with two social norms, involving two languages spoken in a single conversation, or reading words in two languages at the same time. Throughout his life, Miguel has made great attempts to balance his identity. Since moving to Washington, Miguel has been told he’s not American enough, and should go back to Mexico. They called this his “Country of Origin”, well he can’t because he’s a U.S. citizen without the ability to become a Mexican Citizen. When he’s is in Mexico, he’s not accepted socially and culturally. In this he’s not Mexican enough. Miguel is one of the many people that live their life neither from here or there, but living in a fine line between two countries of origin.

    The creative efforts Miguel develops are from two different mediums. Film photography and digital illustration. Many call this mixed media, but the media is not mixed together. The illustration stands apart from the photograph. The reality people see in the photograph is the world we all live in. The photograph is the monocultural world. The illustrated portion is the uniqueness of being bicultural in the monocultural world. The mediums are not mixed, but live simultaneously in every creative effort Miguel makes. 

    Websites: ltnxartes.com | miguelgonzales.com

    Facebook: @ltnxartes

    Instagram: @ltnxartes

  • DIAL.studio | Places + Spaces: Navigating Workspaces In-Person and Online

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/05/2020

    This presentation will cover best practices and tips for pre-career and emerging leaders to learn more about working in the arts administration field. As our current work environments shift from in-person to online, this workshop will invite participants to explore what working environments look like in both spaces.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    This presentation will cover best practices and tips for pre-career and emerging leaders to learn more about working in the arts administration field. As our current work environments shift from in-person to online, this workshop will invite participants to explore what working environments look like in both spaces. 

    Participants will:

    • Enhance their knowledge about arts administration work culture, and how to best navigate both in-person and virtual spaces
    • Learn techniques and skills about how to navigate online spaces and working from home

    This session is a part of the DIAL.studio | Professional Development Series and is free for all who register. Can't make an event live? Register anyway for access to the recording. 

    Please note that while this session is free and open to all, it was curated with the intention of supporting college students, pre-career, and emerging leaders traditionally underrepresented within the arts field.


    This program is made possible by support from ConEdison, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Kutya Major Foundation, and The Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

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    Ami Scherson

    Equity in Arts Leadership Program Associate, Americans for the Arts

    Ami Scherson (she/her/hers) is an arts administrator, musician, and self proclaimed "mover". She is fascinated by the intersections of social justice and the arts, and strongly believes in using creativity to create positive change. Ami works for Americans for the Arts as the Equity in Arts Leadership Program Associate, creating opportunities and initiatives to pursue cultural equity throughout the field. Prior to working at Americans for the Arts, she has interned at Kaufman Music Center, the Cleveland Orchestra, and Stuart's Opera House. She is passionate about community development, and has pursued projects throughout urban, suburban, and rural regions of the United States. Most recently, she conducted research in Nelsonville, Ohio to understand the impact of nonprofit arts programming on rural Appalachian communities. She graduated from Ohio University's Honors Tutorial College with a B.A. in Music and a minor in Business. In addition to her work, Ami is a member of the Dance/NYC Junior Committee 2019-2020 Cohort. She is a proud Japanese-Chilean, and currently lives in Queens, NY. 

    Nikki Kirk

    Equity in Arts Leadership Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Nikki joined Americans for the Arts in February 2020. As the Equity in Arts Leadership Program Manager, she will work to envision, design, and implement programs to improve the entry, advancement, and leadership opportunities for historically and currently marginalized or underrepresented arts administrators in the arts and culture field.

    Nikki holds a Bachelor's degree in Political Linguistics from Pitzer College in southern California, where she solidified her interests in language, human rights, and cross-cultural understanding. She also holds a Master's degree in Arts, Festival, and Cultural Management from Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she researched the impact of programming at the intersection of arts and social justice. Her previous work experiences include organizations across the US, such as the Massachusetts Cultural Council, El Sistema USA, Berklee College of Music, and The Center for Arts-Inspired Learning, among others.