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  • Creating Spaces: Performing Arts in Sacred Places - Part 2

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Artists have been creating out of and incubated by sacred places (churches, synagogues, temples, etc) for a long time. So much of that is based on the chance encounter, a congregant or clergy leader who happens to love art and wants it in their space or any number of other non-linear ways. Partners for Sacred Places has figured out how to put the two together in a purposeful and meaningful manner. Internal conversations and external transparency and more are key to a successful partnership between the two.

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     About this Webinar

    Artists have been creating out of and incubated by sacred places (churches, synagogues, temples, etc) for a long time. However, so much of art in sacred places is based on the chance encounter, a congregant or clergy leader who happens to love art and wants it in their space or any number of other non-linear ways. Partners for Sacred Places has figured out how to put the two together in a purposeful and meaningful manner. Internal conversations and external transparency and more are key to a successful partnership between the two.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn about what internal conversations need to be had before space sharing
    • How are artist and sacred place space sharing relationships unique
    • How do these relationships transcend the typical model of landlord/tenant and how can they do more than that model


    Check out part one of this two-part webinar: https://artsu.americansforthearts.org/products/creating-spaces-performing-arts-in-sacred-places-part-1 

    Karen DiLossi

    Director, Making Homes for the Arts in Sacred Places, Partners for Sacred Places

    Karen DiLossi earned her degrees from Washington College and Villanova University. Karen has worked professionally in theatre since 2000 both onstage and off and has achieved particular success as stage manager, director, and producer. As a director, she has tackled classics (Tartuffe & Twelfth Night) and contemporary pieces (Jump/Cut, Pounding Nails in the Floor with my Forehead) as well many original new works as Co-Artistic Director for Madhouse Theater Company. She was the Program Director for the Theatre Alliance for 8 years where she produced the Barrymore Awards many times and directed them herself twice. As Director of Arts in Sacred Places, she has built and brought to a national stage a program that connects artists and congregations and also engages multiple civic, nonprofit, and funder stakeholders. Over the past eight years, she has expanded this originally Philadelphia-based program into Chicago, Austin, and Baltimore. Starting in the summer of 2019, Karen will begin piloting the program in New York City. Karen also led the research report Creating Spaces which elevated the artist space crisis conversation nationwide and in the Spring of 2016 opened The Philadelphia Design Center, the first of its kind in the country. Just this May (2019), she produced Grounds that Shout! (and others merely shaking) a series of performances curated by Reggie Wilson (Fist and Heel Performance Group) where the artists performatively respond to religious spaces, with a focus on the history of the black and POC religious experience in Philadelphia and the United States.

    Website: https://sacredplaces.org/ 

    Twitter: @sacred_places  
           

    Partners' website link to Arts in Sacred Places: https://sacredplaces.org/reimagine-your-community/arts-culture

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Grounds that Shout project: https://sacredplaces.org/reimagine-your-community/grounds-that-shout

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Creating Spaces report: https://sacredplaces.org/tools-research/3-city-arts-study

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Philadelphia Design Center project: https://www.phillydesigncenter.org/

  • Connecting Communities Through Events

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/23/2019

    Most organizations feel the need to produce regular events to gain new audiences and foster returning patrons. However, if each event is not connecting with the community in a meaningful way, it is hard to rationalize the long hours your staff has put into producing it. Event production is more than just a logistical task and success can be gauged in more ways than just the audience numbers. This webinar will touch on how to look for the right person to produce your events and how logistical details should not take precedence over the skill of creating a mini-program that furthers your organization's mission and most importantly connects communities and creates thriving collaborations.

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     About this Webinar

    Most organizations feel the need to produce regular events to gain new audiences and foster returning patrons. However, if each event is not connecting with the community in a meaningful way, it is hard to rationalize the long hours your staff has put into producing it. Event production is more than just a logistical task and success can be gauged in more ways than just the audience numbers. This webinar will touch on how to look for the right person to produce your events and how logistical details should not take precedence over the skill of creating a mini-program that furthers your organization's mission and most importantly connects communities and creates thriving collaborations. 

    Learning Objectives

    • Understanding how to cultivate relationships through events
    • How to hire the right person to produce your events
    • How to gauge success for your organization after events

    Sarah Rucker

    Founder, Full Gallop

    Sarah is a lifelong arts lover and advocate with 13 years of experience in arts research, programming and presenting. She is the founder of Full Gallop, which offers event production, community engagement and artist consulting services. Full Gallop strives to bridge cultures and connect communities through creative collaborations and programs. She has a personal mission to help increase equity in the arts, especially in Austin, where she recently started the Inclusion Riders Initiative ATX. She was also a founding board member of Austin Emerging Arts Leaders from 2013-2019.

    Website: FullGallopArts.com

    Facebook: http://facebook.com/fullgalloparts

    Instagram: http://instagram.com/fullgalloparts


  • 400 Years of Inequality: A People’s Observance for a Just Future

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    400 Years of Inequality: A People’s Observance for a Just Future is calling on communities across the country to engage in place-based observances of the 400th anniversary of the 1619 arrival of the first Africans trafficked across the Atlantic Ocean and sold into bondage in the U.S. Our initiative is calling on families, organizations, neighborhoods, and cities to observe the anniversary by telling their stories of oppression and resistance. Inequality is a threat to our health and democracy. To gear up for these observances, our webinar will feature members of the organizing team, Ashley Bernal and Molly Rose Kaufman. They will share the project background and offer tools and resources for people and organizations to activate place-based creative observances for truth-telling and collective healing. 400 Years of Inequality is a coalition of organizations and individuals dedicated to dismantling structural inequality and building strong, healthy communities.

    image About this Webinar

    August 14, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    400 Years of Inequality: A People’s Observance for a Just Future is calling on communities across the country to engage in place-based observances of the 400th anniversary of the 1619 arrival of the first Africans trafficked across the Atlantic Ocean and sold into bondage in the U.S.  Our initiative is calling on families, organizations, neighborhoods, and cities to observe the anniversary by telling their stories of oppression and resistance. Inequality is a threat to our health and democracy.  To gear up for these observances, our webinar will feature members of the organizing team, Ashley Bernal and Erika Kitzmiller.  They will share the project background and offer tools and resources for people and organizations to activate place-based creative observances for truth-telling and collective healing. 400 Years of Inequality is a coalition of organizations and individuals dedicated to dismantling structural inequality and building strong, healthy communities.

    Ashley Bernal

    400 Years of Inequality / The New School

    Ashley Bernal is a Ph.D. student in Public and Urban Policy at The New School’s Milano School of International Affairs. Her research interests include the disparate impact on racial minorities and the various ways racial minorities experience US citizenship. Prior to her doctoral studies, Ashley served as a Gender-based Violence Program Coordinator where she created a culturally specific program to better service African-American and LGBTQIA domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking survivors of the greater New Orleans metropolitan area. Currently, she is a research consultant and adjunct professor at the City University of New York’s York College, teaching courses in the Sociology of Race & Ethnicity, Sociology of Gender, and Social Stratification.

    Website: http://www.400yearsofinequality.org/

    Twitter: @400yrs

    Erika Kitzmiller

    400 Years of Inequality / Columbia University

    Erika M. Kitzmiller is a historian of race, inequality, and education whose scholarship focuses on the historical processes and current reforms that contribute to and address inequality today. Her current book project, The Roots of Educational Inequality: Philadelphia and Germantown High School (under contract, University of Pennsylvania Press), traces the history of racial and educational inequality in Philadelphia and one of the city's neighborhood high schools, Germantown High School, over the course of the 20th century from the school's founding to its ultimate closure in 2013. Her scholarship has been supported with grants from the National Science Foundation, Harvard University's Hutchins Center, the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, and Teachers College, Columbia University.  She earned her dual Ph.D. in History and Education and M.P.A. at the University of Pennsylvania and her B.A. from Wellesley College. She lives in Morningside Heights with her husband and young children.

    Website: http://www.400yearsofinequality.org/

    Twitter: @400yrs

  • How Did We Get Here? Understanding the History of Nonprofit Culture

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/17/2019

    What would it look like if we had a comprehensive understanding of who we are and where we have come from as nonprofit organizations? Could this allow us to evolve, adapt, and ensure relevance in today’s climate? This webinar, the first of a three-part series, will reflect on the history of nonprofits and institutional norms, providing greater context for the structures that we work within. From this framework, the following two webinars will explore alternative approaches to organizational structure, leadership models, and succession planning as a way to empower new leadership, embody inclusivity, and foster equity while furthering the organization’s mission.

    image About this Webinar

    July 17, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Nonprofits are tasked with creating change, inspiring and cultivating future leaders and providing critical resources for healthy community development. However, they are often underfunded and understaffed, conditioning them to act from a place of scarcity or familiarity in pursuit of their mission. With this comes a limited set of possibilities. 

    What would it look like if we had a comprehensive understanding of who we are and where we have come from as nonprofit organizations? Could this allow us to evolve, adapt, and ensure relevance in today’s climate? This webinar, the first of a three-part series, will reflect on the history of nonprofits and institutional norms, providing greater context for the structures that we work within. From this framework, the following two webinars will explore alternative approaches to organizational structure, leadership models, and succession planning as a way to empower new leadership, embody inclusivity, and foster equity while furthering the organization’s mission.

  • Federal Funding for Arts in Transit & Transportation Update

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/26/2019

    In 2015, the FAST Act was passed into law, prohibiting the use of FTA funds for art in transit project. Join us on 6/26 for a webinar looking at the history and impact of this passage and learn how you can advocate for the return of federal funding for arts in transit projects.

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     About this Webinar

    On December 4, 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (Pub. L. No. 114-94) was signed into law which provides a long-term funding certainty for surface transportation infrastructure planning and investment. Unfortunately, the FAST Act also established a prohibition for use of FTA funds for art in transit projects, disrupting a long standing and highly lauded national tradition. The 2015 prohibitions remove local control from transit authorities and reverses nearly over 100 years of systemic enhancement of our transit systems to the detriment of communities across the U.S. In this webinar, hear from Americans for the Arts staff as they outline the history and impact of this issue and highlight how you can advocate for the return of federal funding for arts in transit projects.

    During this webinar, attendees will:

    • Learn about the federal funding prohibitions for arts in transportation and transit projects
    • Understand the impact of the provisions on communities across the U.S.
    • Leave with information and resources to engage with their U.S. House of Representatives on the issue of federal funding for arts in transportation and transit.

    Patricia Walsh

    Public Art & Civic Design Senior Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Patricia Walsh joined Americans for the Arts in 2014 where she works to empower public art professionals, artists and other stakeholders in the implementation of public art in their communities by supporting best practices, case studies, resource development, and peer-to-peer networking.
     
    In her role at Americans for the Arts, Patricia has grown the annual Public Art Preconference to over 300 attendees, moderates the 400+ membership-based Public Art Network, and travels frequently to communities across the country to engage and learn from her colleagues working locally. She designed the Public Art Resource Center, an online portal to increase access to tools, resources, and opportunities for those making public art happen in their communities. She manages partnerships with Smart Growth America/Transportation for America and the American Planning Association and continues to develop strategies to engage allied fields to cultivate policy and practice that supports public art in the built environment across the country.

    Lauren Cohen

    Government Affairs and Grassroots Senior Coordinator, Americans for the Arts

    At Americans for the Arts, Lauren works with the Federal Affairs team in federal lobbying and government affairs activities, including composing position statements, monitoring federal legislation, drafting legislative proposals, coalition building with the Congressional Arts Caucus and other Congressional staff.  She enjoys teaching others how to become compelling arts advocates and how to pursue strong arts policy.  Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, Lauren worked for a member of Congress in the U.S. House of Representatives for over two years where she managed the arts, humanities, and museums portfolio.  Before coming to Washington, DC, Lauren worked for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, Virginia.  There, she held positions in the Education Outreach, Historical Interpretations, and Curatorial departments.  Lauren earned her Master of Arts degree in Public History from James Madison University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Tennessee.  Lauren's passion for the arts began at age three when she first started ballet lessons and continues to this day as she enjoys dance and theater performances, museums, and art shows.

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Marketing Support for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/26/2019

    What skills do artists need to thrive in a crowded marketplace? Join us on 6/26 for a Coffee Chat with Ceylon Mitchell, marketing guru from @m3musician, as we discuss strategies to start, manage, and grow a business for individual artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat 

     Marketing Support for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for June 2019 will be about marketing support for artists.

    What marketing skills do artists need to thrive?

    Join Ceylon Mitchell, Musician and Owner/Director of M3 Music Media Marketing, LLC, as he discusses strategies to start, manage, and grow a business for an individual artist. Learn tips about how you can support musicians and other artists in their journey of growing their recognition and business.

    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Ceylon Mitchell II

    Owner and Director, M3 Music Media Marketing

    Ceylon Narvelle Mitchell II is a professional flutist, arts entrepreneur, educator, and arts advocate in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. Originally from Anchorage, Alaska and a graduate of East Anchorage High School, he earned a Master of Music Education degree from Boston University and a Master of Music Performance degree from the University of Maryland, in addition to a Graduate Certificate in Multimedia Journalism. Ceylon will continue his education in the Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) flute program at the University of Maryland in Fall 2019. Recent achievements include the National Music Festival Symphony Orchestra, the Young Alaskan Artist Award, a 2018 Prince George’s County Forty UNDER 40 Award in Arts & Humanities, and a 2019 Prince George’s Arts and Humanities Council Artist Fellowship Grant. Ceylon’s mission is keeping classical music alive, authentic, and accessible.

    An active freelance artist, Ceylon is the co-founder, flutist, and media manager of Potomac Winds, a chamber music collective. Described by the University of Maryland as “magnificent, deeply moving, and a model of alumni pride,” the ensemble is committed to promoting woodwind chamber music as a virtuosic medium through engaging performances of the highest level of artistic expression. As a music educator, Ceylon maintains a private studio in Maryland and serves as the Potomac Valley Youth Orchestra flute choir conductor. He previously served as a teaching artist with the Boston Flute Academy and as the director of the Boston University Flute Ensemble. Ceylon supports performing artists and arts organizations with digital media production and marketing consulting as the owner and founder of M3 Music Media Marketing, LLC, a multimedia organization. Tailored services include photography, videography, and social media marketing. Recent clients include The Clarice, the Arts & Humanities Council of Montgomery County, the Boulanger Initiative, Capitol Hill Jazz Foundation, the Anchorage Festival of Music, and numerous individual artists. Ceylon seeks to equip and empower his fellow performing artists for artistic and marketing success in a 21st-century landscape. Ceylon is also an active arts advocate in the D.C. area, serving as a board member of the Arts Administrators of Color Network and an Emerging Arts Advocates (EAA) member of Maryland Citizens for the Arts.

    Mentors, past and present, include Dr. Saïs Kamalidiin, Ms. Janese Sampson, Professor Leah Arsenault, Dr. William Montgomery, Professor Linda Toote, Dr. Carmen Lemoine, and Sharon Nowak of Anchorage, Alaska, his first flute teacher. Additionally, Ceylon has performed in masterclasses for professional flutists such as Aaron Goldman, Marina Piccinini, Sir James Galway, Paul Edmund-Davies, Trevor Wye, and Marianne Gedigian. He remains grateful to the entire Anchorage music community for preparing him for a promising career in the arts with encouragement and inspiration. Ceylon currently resides in Bladensburg, Maryland with his wife, Denys Symonette Mitchell.

    Twitter: @ceylonmitchell and @m3musician

    Website:  www.ceylonmitchell.com and www.m3musicmedia.com

    Cristyn Johnson (Moderator)

    Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Cristyn Johnson is the Local Arts Advancement Program Manager at Americans for the Arts. In this capacity, she develops Americans for the Arts’ comprehensive full-career-spectrum field education offerings to advance competent and informed local, regional and national arts professionals.  She also develops a suite of programs and resources centered around the full leadership pipeline and organizational needs of a diverse workforce. She manages, grows, and cultivates an Emerging Leaders Network, a Mid-Career Leaders Network, and an Executive Leaders Network by building a connected network of arts professionals in the field of practices, who can share their knowledge with the field at large.        

  • Best Practices for Public Art Commissions

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/21/2019

    In 2016, the Americans for the Arts Public Art Network (PAN) Advisory Council launched a series of best practices for the commissioning of public art projects to provide a nationally accepted set of standards and guidelines for the development and implementation of public art projects. Three years later, The PAN Council is currently updating and reviewing the best practices and are looking for feedback from the field. Join PAN Council representatives to review recent edits and provide insight for the updated Best Practices for Public Art Commissions.

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     About this Webinar

    In 2016, the Americans for the Arts Public Art Network (PAN) Advisory Council launched a series of best practices for the commissioning of public art projects to provide a nationally accepted set of standards and guidelines for the development and implementation of public art projects. Three years later, The PAN Council is currently updating and reviewing the best practices and are looking for feedback from the field. Join PAN Council representatives to review recent edits and provide insight for the updated Best Practices for Public Art Commissions.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will...

    • Learn about the development process for the national Best Practices for Public Art Commissions 
    • Have the opportunity to provide insight into the updating of the Best Practices for Public Art Commissions

    Clare Haggarty

    Senior Manager, Transportation Planning (Arts & Design), Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority

    Clare Haggarty works for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) as a Senior Manager for Transportation Planning in Arts and Design. Metro is a world-class transportation system moving 10 million people a day throughout Los Angeles County. The Arts and Design group produces innovative, award-winning visual art and integrated design as well as performing arts programming that encourages ridership and connects people, sites and neighborhoods throughout L.A. County. Previously Ms. Haggarty worked at the Los Angeles County Arts Commission for seven years and was the Deputy Director of Collections for the Civic Art Program. Ms. Haggarty has a degree in History of Art from the University of Glasgow in Scotland and a graduate degree in Curatorial Practice from California College of the Arts.

    Website: www.metro.net/art

    Kipp Kobayashi

    Artist

    As an artist and urban designer, Kipp Kobayashi has a keen interest in the effects of human activity on our public environments and is in constant search for ways to initiate dialogue and to promote sociability within these spaces. His work explores how these overlapping narrative threads merge with the physical characteristics of a specific environment to create unique sets of combinations and patterns that define a more nuanced interpretation of identity and cultural belonging.

     In a career spanning nearly two decades, Kobayashi has created projects and presented designs for cities across the nation and for such organizations as the Getty Museum, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, Sound Transit and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority. Based in Los Angeles, he received a BA from the University of California at Berkeley, an MFA from the University of Southern California and has taught extensively at the Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design. In addition, he is currently serving as a member of the Public Art Network Advisory Council which provides recommendations and insight to Americans for the Arts for the development and execution of public art services and resources.

    Twitter: @BoiArtAndHist

    Website: www.kippkobayashi.com/

    Michael Chavez

    Public Art Program Manager, Denver Arts & Venues

    Michael Chavez is the Public Art Program Manager for the City & County of Denver. Denver’s 1% for Public Art Program celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2018 and holds more than 410 public artworks in its collection with more than $40 million invested in public art since 1988. Chavez oversees the conservation, care, and maintenance of the collection as well as the selection process for new public art commissions. Currently, the program has more than 40 active public art commissions in progress.  

    Chavez also serves on the Public Art Network (PAN) Advisory Council through Americans for the Arts. PAN is a professional network dedicated to advancing public art programs and projects in the United States through advocacy, policy, and information resources to further art and design in our built environment.

    Website: www.denverpublicart.org

  • Creating Accessible Performances 101

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/18/2019

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990 and yet people with disabilities still do not have full access to cultural events today. This session will explore what accessibility entails and how presenters can move beyond architectural accessibility to programmatic accessibility.

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     About this Webinar

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990 and yet people with disabilities still do not have full access to cultural events today. This session will explore what accessibility entails and how presenters can move beyond architectural accessibility to programmatic accessibility. 

    Learning Objectives

    • Participants will gain an awareness of the core issues and principles for presenting accessible cultural events
    • Participants will gain an understanding of strategies for making access an integral part of an organization’s mission, programs and outreach.
    • Participants will understand how making accessibility a priority creates better experiences for people both with and without disabilities.

    Rhoda Bernard

    Managing Director, Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs

    Rhoda Bernard is the Managing Director of the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs, a catalyst for the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in all aspects of visual and performing arts education. She holds a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, in government from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Music with academic honors in jazz voice from New England Conservatory. She earned both her Master of Education and Doctor of Education degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Bernard regularly presents research at conferences throughout the United States and abroad, and she provides professional development workshops for educators in local, national, and international forums. Her work has been published in several book chapters and in numerous journals, including Music Educators JournalMusic Education ResearchAction, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education; Mountain Lake Reader; and Arts and Learning Research Journal. Bernard has been honored with the Berklee Urban Service Award (2017), the Boston Conservatory Community Service Award (2011), the Boston Conservatory Faculty/Staff Spirit Award (2007), and the Outstanding Dissertation Award, Honorable Mention (Second Place) from the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. A vocalist and pianist who specializes in jazz music and Jewish Music in Yiddish and Hebrew, she performs regularly with a number of klezmer bands and has recorded two CDs with the band Klezamir. 

    Website: www.berklee.edu/biaesn

    Judith Smith

    Founding Member and Artistic Director Emerita, AXIS Dance Company

    Judith Smith, Founding Member and Artistic Director Emerita of AXIS Dance Company, is one of the world’s driving forces in physically integrated dance. She was born and raised in the mountains of Colorado. Prior to becoming disabled in a car accident at age 17 in 1977, Judith was a champion equestrian. She transferred her passion for riding to dance after discovering contact improvisation in 1983. Judith helped launch AXIS in 1987 and she grew the Company to be the nation’s leading physically integrated dance ensemble. She has left an amazing legacy and vision for the future of AXIS and integrated dance.

    Her advocacy and equity work led to the first-ever National Convening on the Future of Physically Integrated Dance in the USA, followed by six regional town halls throughout the country in 2016. This project, supported by the prestigious Doris Duke Charitable Foundation National Project Program, culminated in an extensive report and the launch of the AXIS Artistic Advancement Platform to Advance Artistry, Opportunity and Equity for Dancers with Disabilities. She has been instrumental in the creation of the Dance/USA Disability and Dance Affinity Group and co-chairs the group.

    Judith is currently working as an independent consultant in dance and disability. She is an activist for the environment, animals and people with disabilities. She gardens for pollinators, birdwatches, raises butterflies and is involved in thoroughbred racehorse rescue and adaptive carriage driving.

    Website: http://www.axisdance.org/advocacy

    NEA Design for Accessibility -- A Cultural Administrator’s Handbook: https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/Design-for-Accessibility.pdf

    Light for the World – Disability Inclusion Scorecard: https://lab.light-for-the-world.org/publications/disability-inclusion-score-card/

    British Council Disability Arts International: http://www.disabilityartsinternational.org/about-us/

    Make Accessibility Information Easy to Find on Your Website and Keep it Up to Date: https://www.flynncenter.org/about-us/accessibility-information.html

  • Accessibility Training for Arts Administrators

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    Currently, one in five Americans living in the United States identifies as a person with a disability. And while the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990, people with disabilities still do not have full access to cultural events today. While providing physical access to those that attend your space or events is a good start, it's simply not enough anymore. The goal is to create exhibits and events that not only meet the specific physical needs of people with disabilities, but also makes them feel welcomed.

    Equal access to arts and cultural events are a driving force in the pursuit of cultural equity. Currently, one in five Americans living in the United States identifies as a person with a disability. And while the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990, people with disabilities still do not have full access to cultural events today. While providing physical access to those that attend your space or events is a good start, it's simply not enough anymore. The goal is to create exhibits and events that not only meet the specific physical needs of people with disabilities, but also makes them feel welcomed. Making adaptions to theatrical performances, visual arts exhibits, or workshops allows people with and without disabilities the same opportunity to take part in arts and culture experiences


    This project is created in partnership with Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation and New Jersey State Council on the Arts, and is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Creating Spaces: Performing Arts in Sacred Places - Part 1

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/06/2019

    ​Creating Spaces is series of focus groups, surveys, and inventories addresses head-on the facility needs of artists who need space and sacred places who have unused or underused space to share in a unique way that has the potential for catalytic change. This webinar will talk about how this research can be directly applied to any region, neighborhood, or community. It will also explore how what looks to be on the surface is not what you find once you dig just below.

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     About this Webinar

    The Arts in Sacred Places program at Partners for Sacred Places has developed Creating Spaces: a series of focus groups, surveys, and inventories addresses head-on the facility needs of artists who need space and sacred places who have unused or underused space to share in a unique way that has the potential for catalytic change. This webinar will talk about how this research can be directly applied to any region, neighborhood, or community. It will also explore how what looks to be on the surface is not what you find once you dig just below. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Engaging and listening to community needs
    • Activating your community in ways they want
    • How R & D in advance can save money down the road


    Check out part two of this two-part webinar: https://artsu.americansforthearts.org/products/creating-spaces-performing-arts-in-sacred-places-part-2 

    Karen DiLossi

    Director, Making Homes for the Arts in Sacred Places, Partners for Sacred Places

    Karen DiLossi earned her degrees from Washington College and Villanova University. Karen has worked professionally in theatre since 2000 both onstage and off and has achieved particular success as stage manager, director, and producer. As a director, she has tackled classics (Tartuffe & Twelfth Night) and contemporary pieces (Jump/Cut, Pounding Nails in the Floor with my Forehead) as well many original new works as Co-Artistic Director for Madhouse Theater Company. She was the Program Director for the Theatre Alliance for 8 years where she produced the Barrymore Awards many times and directed them herself twice. As Director of Arts in Sacred Places, she has built and brought to a national stage a program that connects artists and congregations and also engages multiple civic, nonprofit, and funder stakeholders. Over the past eight years, she has expanded this originally Philadelphia-based program into Chicago, Austin, and Baltimore. Starting in the summer of 2019, Karen will begin piloting the program in New York City. Karen also led the research report Creating Spaces which elevated the artist space crisis conversation nationwide and in the Spring of 2016 opened The Philadelphia Design Center, the first of its kind in the country. Just this May (2019), she produced Grounds that Shout! (and others merely shaking) a series of performances curated by Reggie Wilson (Fist and Heel Performance Group) where the artists performatively respond to religious spaces, with a focus on the history of the black and POC religious experience in Philadelphia and the United States.

    Website: https://sacredplaces.org/ 

    Twitter: @sacred_places  
           

    Partners' website link to Arts in Sacred Places: https://sacredplaces.org/reimagine-your-community/arts-culture

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Grounds that Shout project: https://sacredplaces.org/reimagine-your-community/grounds-that-shout

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Creating Spaces report: https://sacredplaces.org/tools-research/3-city-arts-study

    Partners' Arts in Sacred Places Philadelphia Design Center project: https://www.phillydesigncenter.org/

    Grounds that Shout Video: https://vimeo.com/333658780?fbclid=IwAR2dPYv7ZhsiL-LjJqrgqOTZ5IMrPCk5NRl4z7UAXA9GPTsNZ5ZCW13ArAc