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  • County Arts Network Call: Leveraging Partnerships for Increased Impact, Efficiency, and Reach

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/02/2019

    From new public art initiatives and community events to capacity building programs and cooperative marketing, partnerships are frequently used at the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County (AHCMC) to achieve our mission, support the creative economy, and increase the impact, reach, and efficiency of our programs. In this webinar we will explore partnerships with local government agencies, media outlets, funders, real estate developers, and grantees that scaffold and expand AHCMC’s core work. These partnerships support individual artists and arts organizations, expand opportunities in the creative economy, and influence arts-inclusive policies across Montgomery County. Throughout the webinar we will explore different types of partnerships, goal setting and evaluation of partnerships, and tactics for leveraging advocacy in combination with partnerships to achieve organizational and programs goals. Following the presentation, an interactive discussion will be facilitated to give participants an opportunity to share their past experiences with partnerships, discuss perceived barriers to success, and pitch future partnership ideas.

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    About this Conversation

    From new public art initiatives and community events to capacity building programs and cooperative marketing, partnerships are frequently used at the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County (AHCMC) to achieve our mission, support the creative economy, and increase the impact, reach, and efficiency of our programs. In this webinar we will explore partnerships with local government agencies, media outlets, funders, real estate developers, and grantees that scaffold and expand AHCMC’s core work. These partnerships support individual artists and arts organizations, expand opportunities in the creative economy, and influence arts-inclusive policies across Montgomery County. Throughout the webinar we will explore different types of partnerships, goal setting and evaluation of partnerships, and tactics for leveraging advocacy in combination with partnerships to achieve organizational and programs goals. Following the presentation, an interactive discussion will be facilitated to give participants an opportunity to share their past experiences with partnerships, discuss perceived barriers to success, and pitch future partnership ideas.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Inspire participants to leverage their networks and resources to build partnerships that support them in achieving their organizational/program goals through discussing examples of partnerships at AHCMC.
    • Explore the cross-section of partnerships and advocacy to help identify the best relationships participants already have in order to identify potential future partnerships.
    • Support participants in creating defined partnerships goals that can be measured and evaluated in order to focus on impact and efficiency of partnerships.

    Joe Frandoni

    Deputy Director, Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County

    For the past ten years, Joe Frandoni has advocated for expanded cross-cultural dialogue, equity, and increased operational efficiency in arts management; leading arts and cultural organization to develop innovative values-based business solutions that expand their community impact and operational efficiency. He is a graduate of both the Master in Arts Management program at Carnegie Mellon University and the Masters in Innovation and Organization of Culture and the Arts at the University of Bologna in Bologna Italy. In his current position as Deputy Director of the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County (AHCMC), he spearheads program development for AHCMC, advocacy efforts for the community, and capacity-building initiatives for constituents. Previously, he has held positions with the Kennedy Center’s DeVos Institute of Arts Management, the Center for Arts Management and Technology, and as a middle school music teacher in his home state of Ohio.      

    Website: www.creativemoco.com | www.culturespotmc.com    

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Crafting an Artist Statement

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/25/2019

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for November 2019 will be about crafting an artist statement.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about artist portfolios.

    How can artists create statements to set them apart?

    Join Naomi RaMona Schliesman, Artist Development Director for rural programming for Springboard for the Arts’ Fergus Falls, MN office, as she discusses the who, what, and why of crafting an artist statement, as well as how artists can sharpen the best description of who they are. 

    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Naomi RaMona Schliesman

    Artist Development Director, Springboard for the Arts'

    Naomi RaMona Schliesman is the Artist Development Director for rural programing for Springboard for the Arts’ Fergus Falls, MN office, where she leads the Hinge Arts at the Kirkbride residency program and teaches the Work of Art: Business Skills for Artists workshops. Naomi grew up in Fergus Falls, MN. She has her BFA with an emphasis in sculpture from Minnesota State University Moorhead and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Schliesman has received a Fellowship from Ragdale and Kimmel Hardening Nelson Center for the Arts, was awarded 2nd place for Miami University Young Sculptors Competition for William and Dorothy Yeck Award, and was a LEAP finalist for Society of Contemporary Craft Award. She has traveled abroad to Italy, Scotland, Ireland, France, United Kingdom and Belize to study art and has done artist residencies at Vermont Studio Center, Kimmel Hardening Nelson Center for the arts, Ragadale and Hospitalfield Arts. Schliesman serves on the Public Arts Commission for The City of Fergus Falls and is also a board member for the Fergus Falls Convention and Visitors Bureau, and recently joined the Fergus Falls Childcare Collective. She continues her own studio practice in Visual and Performing Arts and has shown nationally. Schliesman is a single parent to a 3-year old and knows firsthand the struggles of childcare shortage and managing her time as a full-time mom, artist and full-time professional.

    Website: www.springboardforthearts.org

    Twitter: @SpringboardArts

  • Own Your Past, Shape Your Future

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    What would it look like if we had a comprehensive understanding of who we are and where we have come from as nonprofit organizations? Could this allow us to evolve, adapt, and ensure relevance in today’s climate? This series will explore alternative approaches to organizational structure, leadership models, and succession planning as a way to empower new leadership, embody inclusivity, and foster equity while furthering the organization’s mission.

    About this Series

    Own Your Past: Shape Your Future

    What would it look like if we had a comprehensive understanding of who we are and where we have come from as nonprofit organizations? Could this allow us to evolve, adapt, and ensure relevance in today’s climate? This series will explore alternative approaches to organizational structure, leadership models, and succession planning as a way to empower new leadership, embody inclusivity, and foster equity while furthering the organization’s mission.

  • Successful Successions: Empowering the Next Generation of Leaders

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/22/2019

    Across the country, a leadership shift is taking place in the arts and culture sector. Organizations are and will encounter significant change as seasoned leaders make way for new leadership. This is an incredible opportunity to empower new leadership while identifying and implementing thoughtful succession processes. This webinar will present examples of successful and smooth leadership transitions and the efforts made by key players involved to ensure an organization's healthy evolution.

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     About this Webinar

    Across the country, a leadership shift is taking place in the arts and culture sector. Organizations are and will encounter significant change as seasoned leaders make way for new leadership. This is an incredible opportunity to empower new leadership while identifying and implementing thoughtful succession processes. This webinar will present examples of successful and smooth leadership transitions and the efforts made by key players involved to ensure an organization's healthy evolution.


    Check out part-one of this three-part series here: How Did We Get Here? Understanding the History of Nonprofit Culture

    Check out part-two of this three-part series here: Working Outside the Box: What do Alternative Organizational Models Look Like?

    Rikki Davis

    Co-Executive Director, Girls Rock! RI

    Rikki Davis (they/them) was a vocal instructor and band coach with Girls Rock! RI for two years before joining the administrative team. They have made use of their bachelor’s degree from McGill University in Art History and Gender Studies working for music festivals, campaigns, art galleries, and museums in Boston and Maine before their most recent position as program director at Slater Mill. Rikki trained in classical voice for 10 years before leaving the opera world in favor of Rock, Jazz, and Pop. They are currently the vocalist and bassist in the band Top Sugar. As a professional, Rikki is passionate about collaborative leadership and approaching administration and programming through an anti-oppression lens. In their free time, Rikki is a skater with Providence Roller Derby under the alter ego, RetroRocket.

    Website: www.girlsrockri.org

    Facebook: @girlsrockri


    Denise Mathews-Reidpath

    Co-Executive Director, Girls Rock! RI

    Denise (she/her) is a bilingual educator who focuses on positive youth development and educational justice aligned with arts accessibility. She has a background as an advocate, interpreter/translator and socio-emotional support in Providence and Central Falls Schools, the RI Disability Law Center, and the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence. Denise is also a community yoga instructor who has volunteered to teach yoga and participating in  body image workshops at Girls Rock Camps and Ladies Rock Camps with a focus on intersectionality, and trauma-informed practices. Denise is a  atinx feminista who loves tacos and flan. She is a self-taught vocalist who dabbles in the harmonica and ukulele with her band Tall and has diverse musical influences from Selena and Buffy Sainte Marie to the Grateful Dead.

    Website: www.girlsrockri.org

    Facebook: @girlsrockri

  • November 2019 Emerging Leaders Network Call

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/21/2019

    Join us each quarter for conference call with the Emerging Leaders Network of Americans for the Arts. Every call will feature an Emerging Leader in the Arts and Culture field, discuss trends in the sector, include open space for Emerging Leaders to share and receive feedback, have an Americans for the Arts update, and more. Emerging Leaders from across the arts and culture sector are encouraged to join. Calls are open and free to members of Americans for the Arts. All calls will be recorded and archived.

    image November 2019 

    Emerging Leaders Network Call

    November 21, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Join us each quarter for conference call with the Emerging Leaders Network of Americans for the Arts. Every call will feature an Emerging Leader in the Arts and Culture field, discuss trends in the sector, include open space for Emerging Leaders to share and receive feedback, have an Americans for the Arts update, and more. Emerging Leaders from across the arts and culture sector are encouraged to join. Calls are open and free to members of Americans for the Arts. All calls will be recorded and archived.

    Featured Guest: Katherine "Kit" Kough, Program Director, Center for Humanities in Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Emerging Leaders Council Member

    Topic: Building Partnerships Outside of the Arts Sector

    Would you like to be featured on one of our quarterly calls? Email Cristyn Johnson to find out more.

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  • Arts and Immigration

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    The arts and…immigration. At this present moment, immigrant artists are often extremely vulnerable and marginalized in our society. Many produce works of high caliber and emigrate here seeking opportunities. They are often educated, experienced, and heralded in their “home” countries. Support for them includes respect for the artist and their art form (frequently, traditional art practices of their native lands). Further, programs specific for immigrant artists need to be created in partnership with the immigrant artists communities. Fears of deportation, incarceration, and voiceless representation earmark many of their lives. Using real-world examples and the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA)’s Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program as a case study; this webinar will share stories from its’ twelve year history, recent experiences offering this program nationwide (Detroit, Oakland, San Antonio, Newark), suggest recommended ways of empowering immigrant artists with tools, resources, and access to own their rightful place in national conversations, and creative processes in the cultural landscape.

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     About this Webinar

    The arts and…immigration. At this present moment, immigrant artists are often extremely vulnerable and marginalized in our society. Many produce works of high caliber and emigrate here seeking opportunities. They are often educated, experienced, and heralded in their “home” countries. Support for them includes respect for the artist and their art form (frequently, traditional art practices of their native lands). Further, programs specific for immigrant artists need to be created in partnership with the immigrant artists communities. Fears of deportation, incarceration, and voiceless representation earmark many of their lives. 

    Using real-world examples and the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA)’s Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program as a case study; this webinar will share stories from its’ twelve year history, recent experiences offering this program nationwide (Detroit, Oakland, San Antonio, Newark), suggest recommended ways of empowering immigrant artists with tools, resources, and access to own their rightful place in national conversations, and creative processes in the cultural landscape. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Participants will learn an overview and history of the program, its goals and outcomes
    • Learn about the moving parts of the program structure that knit together to create an impactful outcome; from mentorship, providing access to networks and resources, alumni engagement, and partnerships
    • Key takeaways; from lessons learned to what challenges immigrant artist encounter and how that can translate to other ways of supporting immigrant artists nationwide and beyond.

    About the Series

    The arts make more things possible, from better education to greater health outcomes to a more civically-engaged citizenry—but people don’t always see the connection to the arts when change happens. From education and job security to housing, public safety, the military, and more, demonstrating the social impact of the arts and other sectors is increasingly important.  In this series, we will examine the social impact of the arts and other sectors. Join us each month for a new webinar and topic.

    Judy Cai

    Senior Program Officer, NYFA Learning

    Judy Cai is the Senior Program Officer of NYFA Learning at the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). She is facilitating various professional development programs at NYFA, such as entrepreneurial boot camps and the Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program, to better serve individual artists. With a strong interest in arts and cultural exchange, Judy is also managing a number of NYFA’s China programs, and outreaching to local Asian artist communities.

    Prior to this position, Judy was the Outreach Coordinator at the Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts. To become a strong advocate of a global arts exchange and collect extensive experiences in international communications, Judy also worked at Christie’s, Dance/USA and Shanghai International Arts Festival. Judy Cai has a MA in Arts Management from Carnegie Mellon University, a BS in Culture and Arts Management, and a Bachelor of Law from Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

    Website: NYFA Immigrant Artist Program

    Alicia Ehni

    Program Officer, NYFA Learning

    Alicia Ehni is a multidisciplinary artist and Program Officer, NYFA Learning.  At the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) she works on professional development programs for artists of all disciplines and implements programs in Spanish. She is also the Editor of NYFA Con Edison Immigrant Artist Newsletter, former New York Chair for Membership for ArtTable 2016-2019 and serves on Grantmakers in the Arts (GIA) Support for Individual Artists committee. 

    In her previous role as Gallery Director of Frederico Seve Gallery/Latincollector, Alicia had the opportunity to work with artist Carmen Herrera, Fanny Sanin, and with artists estates, such as Fundacion Gego and Fundacion Emilio Sanchez.

    Alicia Ehni studied Fine Arts at Universidad Católica, Perú and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY and Arts Administration at NYU. She is a 2018 fellow of NALAC Leadership Institute, was selected as Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts 2018-19 SHIFT Resident Artist, received a 2019 Puffin Foundation Grant and was awarded a residency at MASS MoCA Summer 2019. 

    Website: NYFA Immigrant Artist Program

  • Making the Most of In-Person and Virtual Trainings

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/20/2019

    From venue to speakers to content and beyond, making the most of your in-person and virtual trainings can be a challenge. Cutting through the noise and creating an engaging experience can be the most difficult part. Join us for a webinar packed with tips and best practices for delivering in-person and virtual experiences that will leave your audience wanting more. Led by arts and culture sector presentation experts, participants will learn the value of both in-person and virtual trainings, as well as tactics to increase engagement.

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     About this Webinar


    From venue to speakers to content and beyond, making the most of your in-person and virtual trainings can be a challenge. Cutting through the noise and creating an engaging experience can be the most difficult part. Join us for a webinar packed with tips and best practices for delivering in-person and virtual experiences that will leave your audience wanting more. Led by arts and culture sector presentation experts, participants will learn the value of both in-person and virtual trainings, as well as tactics to increase engagement.

    Learning Objectives:

    • The value of in-person and virtual trainings.
    • Best practices for in-person and virtual trainings.
    • Tactics to increase engagement at in-person and virtual trainings.

    Cristyn Johnson

    Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Cristyn Johnson is the Local Arts Advancement Program Manager at Americans for the Arts. In this capacity, she develops Americans for the Arts’ comprehensive full-career-spectrum field education offerings to advance competent and informed local, regional and national arts professionals.  She also develops a suite of programs and resources centered around the full leadership pipeline and organizational needs of a diverse workforce. She manages, grows, and cultivates an Emerging Leaders Network, a Mid-Career Leaders Network, and an Executive Leaders Network by building a connected network of arts professionals in the field of practices, who can share their knowledge with the field at large.        

    Ceci Dadisman

    Digital Marketing Manager, FORM

    Ceci Dadisman is a multi-faceted arts administration professional with more than 10 years of experience successfully marketing the arts and nonprofits utilizing innovative methods. Currently the Digital Marketing Manager at FORM, she is nationally recognized as a leader in digital marketing and specializes in multichannel communications campaigns. 

    A frequent public speaker, Ceci’s recent and upcoming engagements feature national conference appearances at NTEN, Museums and the Web, National Arts Marketing Project, Arts Midwest, American Alliance of Museums, OPERA America, Midwest Museums Association, and Chorus America in addition to many other local and regional events. Known for her easy-going and vernacular style, she creates open learning environments with an emphasis on information sharing and useful takeaways. 

    Ceci is passionate about empowering people through marketing and is a senior contributor to Arts Hacker where she regularly shares timely information and step-by-step tutorials. She also teaches the arts marketing course at West Virginia University’s College of Creative Arts. 

    She is on the National Arts Marketing Project Advisory Committee, the Museums and the Web (MW20) Conference Planning Committee, and has served on the Arts Midwest Conference Professional Development Committee and the NTEN Conference Session Advisory Committee. She also served for many years as the OPERA America Marketing Network Chair and currently sits on the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts Visiting Committee. 

    Ceci was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated from West Virginia University’s College of Creative Arts with a Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance.  She currently lives in Cleveland, Ohio.

    WEBSITE: https://theformgroup.com/

    TWITTER: @CeciDadisman

    EMAIL: ceci@theformgroup.com

    Norah Johnson

    Director of Public Awareness & External Affairs

    Norah G. Johnson oversees activities that aim to extend and deepen the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts' (PCA) fulfillment of its mission to foster the excellence, diversity and vitality of the arts in the commonwealth. She is currently working with Americans for the Arts’ National Arts Marketing Project to bring to life Arts Marketing and Audience Engagement in the 21st Century: Building Capacity of Pennsylvania’s Cultural Sector. Johnson’s past projects at the PCA include an exhibit of Pennsylvania textiles, and a video on the history of the Pennsylvania arts community’s 50-year+ relationship with the National Endowment for the Arts.   Prior to joining the PCA, Johnson worked in user experience design and research for Andculture, based in Harrisburg, PA. 

    Website: http://www.arts.pa.gov

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pennsylvaniacouncilonthearts

  • Supporting Individual Artists: Artists of Color Edition

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/07/2019

    The mission of the Arts Council of Indianapolis (ACI) is to foster meaningful engagement in the arts by nurturing a culture where artists and arts organizations thrive. In February 1996, the Arts Council premiered the Art & Soul program, a month-long celebration of African American art and artists, programmed by local African American arts administrators, with daily performances by local musicians, dancers, poets, and thespians in the Indianapolis Artsgarden (a performance and exhibition space owned and operated by ACI). Since its inception, the program has expanded to include a Featured Artist component, for emerging visual and performing artists; a reception for African American arts administrators; engagements beyond the month of February under the “Art & Soul” brand; and professional development opportunities specifically for artists participating in this program. While it was never in question, the expansion of Art & Soul represents the Arts Council’s acknowledgment that African American artists have value beyond Black History Month, and the organization is committed to developing this program in ways that lead to deeper and more regular engagement opportunities, strengthening relationships with African American artists and audiences. This webinar will provide recommendations on how to design programs and services for artists of color with equity in mind, and additionally, how arts managers can utilize these programs to encourage and support participation in other offerings that aren’t oriented to a specific racial demographic. During the presentation, Rishard Allen, Grant Services & Education Partnerships Coordinator, will emphasize the importance of acting in a supporting capacity; of creating a pipeline for deeper engagement; and the art of making yourself relevant. Also, hear from Shamira Wilson, 2019 Featured Visual Artist, on her experience with the program and how that has impacted her relationship with the Arts Council today.

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     About this Webinar

    The mission of the Arts Council of Indianapolis (ACI) is to foster meaningful engagement in the arts by nurturing a culture where artists and arts organizations thrive.

    In February 1996, the Arts Council premiered the Art & Soul program, a month-long celebration of African American art and artists, programmed by local African American arts administrators, with daily performances by local musicians, dancers, poets, and thespians in the Indianapolis Artsgarden (a performance and exhibition space owned and operated by ACI). Since its inception, the program has expanded to include a Featured Artist component, for emerging visual and performing artists; a reception for African American arts administrators; engagements beyond the month of February under the “Art & Soul” brand; and professional development opportunities specifically for artists participating in this program. While it was never in question, the expansion of Art & Soul represents the Arts Council’s acknowledgment that African American artists have value beyond Black History Month, and the organization is committed to developing this program in ways that lead to deeper and more regular engagement opportunities, strengthening relationships with African American artists and audiences.

    This webinar will provide recommendations on how to design programs and services for artists of color with equity in mind, and additionally, how arts managers can utilize these programs to encourage and support participation in other offerings that aren’t oriented to a specific racial demographic. During the presentation, Rishard Allen, Grant Services & Education Partnerships Coordinator, will emphasize the importance of acting in a supporting capacity; of creating a pipeline for deeper engagement; and the art of making yourself relevant. Also, hear from Shamira Wilson, 2019 Featured Visual Artist, on her experience with the program and how that has impacted her relationship with the Arts Council today. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • The importance of incorporating the respective community’s guidance throughout all three phases of a program (planning, implementation, and evaluation)
    • How programs designed for artists of color can be used as entry points for deeper engagement
    • How branding is important in making your organization relevant to new stakeholders (artists and audiences)



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Rishard Allen

    Grant Services & Education Partnerships Coordinator, Arts Council of Indianapolis

    Rishard Allen is arts and culture professional serving the Indianapolis metropolitan area. His administrative practice supports the artistic work of people from marginalized communities, acknowledging their contributions as worthy of being commissioned, exhibited, performed, published, studied, and funded. Allen currently serves as the Grant Services & Education Partnerships Coordinator at the Arts Council of Indianapolis, assisting with the administration of arts education initiatives and grant programs for individual artists and arts organizations. In 2017, he received his B.S. in Arts Management from Indiana University with a specialization in music history and culture. Prior to working at the Arts Council, he was the Program Director at Arts for Learning Indiana and was an Emerging Field Leader with WolfBrown, providing assistance for a nationwide evaluation of The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Art’s Ensuring the Arts for Any Given Child initiative. Rishard also serves on the Arts & Culture Leaders of Color Steering Committee for Americans for the Arts.

    Website: https://indyarts.org/

    Twitter: @artscouncilindy and @RishardDAllen

    Instagram: @artscouncilindy

    Facebook: @indyarts

    Shamira Wilson

    Interdisciplinary Artist

    Shamira Wilson is an interdisciplinary artist based in Indianapolis, IN. She holds a BA in Psychology from Johns Hopkins University, has studied Furniture Design at the Herron School of Art, and attended a residency at the Haystack Mountain School of Craft. Her work has been exhibited in Indianapolis at venues including the Indiana State Museum and Indianapolis Contemporary.

    Website: https://shamirawilson.com/

    Instagram: @shamirawilson

  • Creative Conversation: Gina Rodríguez-Drix

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/06/2019

    In this Creative Conversation, Emerging Leaders Council Member Todd Trebour will be joined in discussion by Gina Rodríguez-Drix, Cultural Affairs Manager for the City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism. The two will discuss how the past is shaping the future of the arts and culture in Providence and Rhode Island. As Providence begins its second cultural planning process, Gina will reflect on the progress of the 2009 Creative Providence Plan and on the complexity and opportunity provided by a public plan that expresses values of equity, access and transformation.

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    About this Creative Conversation


    In this Creative Conversation, Emerging Leaders Council Member Todd Trebour will be joined in discussion by Gina Rodríguez-Drix, Cultural Affairs Manager for the City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism. The two will discuss how the past is shaping the future of the arts and culture in Providence and Rhode Island. As Providence begins its second cultural planning process, Gina will reflect on the progress of the 2009 Creative Providence Plan and on the complexity and opportunity provided by a public plan that expresses values of equity, access and transformation.

    Gina Rodríguez-Drix

    Cultural Affairs Manager, City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism

    Gina Rodríguez-Drix (she/hers) is the Cultural Affairs Manager for the City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism where she manages ACT Public Art program, develops cultural policy, and facilitates creative placemaking projects.  Most recently Gina managed the planning process for the Art in City Life Plan, the City’s first master plan for public art, and is now stewarding the planning process for Creative Providence 2020, the City’s second cultural plan for the creative sector.  Gina’s professional and creative practices are rooted in her fervent passion for social, environmental and reproductive justice and commitment to her hometown. Gina is also a multi-genre writer and birth-doula who raises her young family in Providence.

    Websitehttps://artculturetourism.com/       

    Todd Trebour

    Organizations Program Director, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts

    Todd Trebour is the Organizations Program Director at the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA). Todd manages and oversees the agency’s support for organizations, including grants, programs, and services. A strong believer the power of partnerships and networks, Todd has piloted several new initiatives in his first year at RISCA, including affinity group convenings of organizations; an Arts and Cultural Advocacy Workshop series with the United Way of Rhode Island, City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, and Rhode Island Council for the Humanities; and an Advancing Cultural Equity Workshop and Technical Assistance Program in partnership with the Rhode Island Foundation. He has also seen a 47% increase in applications to the Arts Access project grant program thanks to intensive and continuous outreach to Rhode Island organizations. Todd received his BA in Music Performance from Whitman College, his MM in Voice from Rice University, and his Core Certificate in Arts Management from the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service. Currently, Todd is in his second term on the Emerging Leaders Advisory Council at Americans for the Arts.

    Twitter: @RISCA1967

    Website: http://www.arts.ri.gov/

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Artist Portfolios

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/04/2019

    Building a strong artist portfolio is important as it stands as a reflection of work and artistic point of view. Join us for a virtual conversation with Adia Morris Swanger from Springboard for the Arts as we explore what an artist portfolio is and learn what artists should consider when building their own portfolios.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about artist portfolios.

    What do artists need to consider when building their portfolios?

    Join Adia Morris Swanger, Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, as she discusses why artists need to have a portfolio, what should be included, and how artists should consider what they will include.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    ​Adia Morris Swanger

    Professional Development & Operations Coordinator, Springboard for the Arts

    Adia Morris Swanger is Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, where she oversees the Artist Career Consultant roster, teaches business skills workshops for artists, and connects artists to funding opportunities with the Incubator Fiscal Sponsorship program. Adia is also a freelance theatre artist, writer, and educator based in St. Paul, MN. She also appears on Twin Cities Public Television's Almanac and was the host of  TPT's TV Takeover for Seasons 1 and 2. 

    Website: www.springboardforthearts.org

    Twitter: @longtallsallie