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  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Artist Portfolios

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 11/04/2019 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Building a strong artist portfolio is important as it stands as a reflection of work and artistic point of view. Join us on November 4 for a virtual conversation with Adia Morris Swanger from Springboard for the Arts as we explore what an artist portfolio is and learn what artists should consider when building their own portfolios.

    imageAbout this Conversation

    November 4, 2019 at 1:00PM EDT

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for this month will be about artist portfolios.

    What do artists need to consider when building their portfolios?

    Join Adia Morris Swanger, Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, as she discusses why artists need to have a portfolio, what should be included, and how artists should consider what they will include.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    ​Adia Morris Swanger

    Professional Development & Operations Coordinator, Springboard for the Arts

    Adia Morris Swanger is Professional Development and Operations Coordinator at Springboard for the Arts, where she oversees the Artist Career Consultant roster, teaches business skills workshops for artists, and connects artists to funding opportunities with the Incubator Fiscal Sponsorship program. Adia is also a freelance theatre artist, writer, and educator based in St. Paul, MN. She also appears on Twin Cities Public Television's Almanac and was the host of  TPT's TV Takeover for Seasons 1 and 2. 

    Website: www.springboardforthearts.org

    Twitter: @longtallsallie

  • Creative Conversation: Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 10/30/2019 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    The American Express Emerging Leader Award recognizes visionary leadership by an individual who is a new and/or young arts leader who demonstrates an ability to engage and impact his or her community.​ Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham, museum educator and arts educator was selected as the 2019 American Express Emerging Leader​ Awardee because of her work around developing pedagogical strategies that include the cultural capital of communities, as well as her work with Museum Hue, which increases public access to the arts and opportunities for artists. Joined by Emerging Leader Council Member, Lindsay So, the two will discuss how the past shaping the future of arts leadership.

    imageAbout this Creative Conversation

    October 30, 2019 at 2:00PM EDT


    2019 American Express Emerging Leader Awardee 

    Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham

    The American Express Emerging Leader Award recognizes visionary leadership by an individual who is a new and/or young arts leader who demonstrates an ability to engage and impact his or her community. Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham, museum educator and arts educator was selected as the 2019 American Express Emerging Leader Awardee because of her work around developing pedagogical strategies that include the cultural capital of communities, as well as her work with Museum Hue, which increases public access to the arts and opportunities for artists. Joined by Emerging Leader Council Member, Lindsay So, the two will discuss how the past is shaping the future of arts leadership.


    About the Series

    For 2019 National Arts & Humanities Month we are taking Creative Conversations to a new level. To engage with leaders in the field, this year’s National Arts Awardees will be in conversation with fellow leaders to discuss issues relevant to today’s community-based arts administrators. Responding to this year’s Creative Conversation prompt, “how is the past shaping the future of the arts?.” awardees will give their insight on how their work impacts their community and organization.

    Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham

    Co-Founder & Creative Director, Museum Hue

    Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham is an agent for arts and culture, forever in a state of exploration, investigation, preservation, and creation. She has practiced inquiry-based learning methodologies as a museum educator and has also taught arts education at the tertiary level as a lecturer. Her experience has informed the creation of Museum Hue, an arts organization that she co-founded and serves as Creative Director, advocating for people of color throughout museums in particular and the arts world in general. Stephanie’s endeavors also inspired the creation of the Hueniversal Flag, a melanin infused color spectrum representing, resilience and resistance for people of color. As a recent United Nations Human Rights Fellow, she has incorporated the UN systems and mechanisms in her pedagogy to increase recognition of and protection for people of color’s artistic practices, historical narratives, and cultural contributions. Stephanie utilizes the arts as a catalyst for societal change and racial equity.

    Website: www.museumhue.com and www.stephaniecunningham.com

    Twitter: @museumhue and @stephaniecunning 

    Lindsay So

    Assistant Director, City of Philadelphia Office of Arts, Culture, and the Creative Economy

    Lindsay So is an arts administrator dedicated to helping arts, culture, and non-arts sectors serve as effective allies for one another. Her experiences in the field have shaped her community-minded approach to developing cultural programs and solutions to benefit Philadelphians. She joined the City of Philadelphia’s Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy (OACCE) in 2013 as the Research & Policy Associate, and now serves as the Assistant Director. In this role, she provides oversight and guidance for all OACCE programs, works to integrate arts, culture and creativity into City activities, and leads staff in the implementation of arts education, community arts, and creative industry initiatives. Prior to OACCE, So developed the organizational systems for CultureTrust Greater Philadelphia, the city’s first Comprehensive Fiscal Management Services program for the cultural community. She holds a bachelor’s degree in art history and a master’s in arts administration from New York University and Drexel University, respectively. She is a member of the Americans for the Arts’ Emerging Leaders Council, and the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation Board of Directors. She has presented at conferences and written on issues facing the non-profit arts sector, including the value of data and evaluation, the role of culture in community development, and cultural equity.

    Website: http://creativephl.org 

    Twitter: @CreativePHLand @lindsaytso 

  • 2019 National Arts Leadership Awardee Creative Conversations

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    For 2019 National Arts & Humanities Month we are taking Creative Conversations to a new level. To engage with leaders in the field, this year’s National Arts Awardees will be in conversation with fellow leaders to discuss issues relevant to today’s community-based arts administrators. Responding to this year’s Creative Conversation prompt, “how is the past shaping the future of the arts?.” awardees will give their insight on how their work impacts their community and organization.

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    About this Series

    For 2019 National Arts & Humanities Month we are taking Creative Conversations to a new level. To engage with leaders in the field, this year’s National Arts Leadership Awardees will be in conversation with fellow leaders to discuss issues relevant to today’s community-based arts administrators. Responding to this year’s Creative Conversation prompt, “how is the past shaping the future of the arts?.” awardees will give their insight on how their work impacts their community and organization.


    This series will feature:

    2019 Selina Roberts Ottum Awardee: Margie Johnson Reese

    2019 Public Art Network Awardee: Roberto Bedoya

    2019 American Express Emerging Leader Awardee: Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham

  • Creative Conversation: Roberto Bedoya

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 10/24/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    The Public Art Network (PAN) Award is given out each year to an individual or organization that demonstrates innovative and creative contributions and/or exemplary commitment and leadership in the field of public art. Roberto Bedoya, Manager, Cultural Affairs, City of Oakland was selected as the 2019 Public Art Network Awardee because of his work and insightfulness of how the arts influence public places. Joined by Public Art Network Councilmember Lucas Antony Cowan, the two will discuss how the past shaping the future of art in the public realm.

    imageAbout this Creative Conversation

    October 24, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT


    2019 Public Art Network Awardee: Roberto Bedoya

    The Public Art Network (PAN) Award is given out each year to an individual or organization that demonstrates innovative and creative contributions and/or exemplary commitment and leadership in the field of public art. Roberto Bedoya, Manager, Cultural Affairs, City of Oakland was selected as the 2019 Public Art Network Awardee because of his work and insightfulness of how the arts influence public places. Joined by Public Art Network Councilmember Lucas Antony Cowan, the two will discuss how the past shaping the future of art in the public realm. 


    About the Series

    For 2019 National Arts & Humanities Month we are taking Creative Conversations to a new level. To engage with leaders in the field, this year’s National Arts Awardees will be in conversation with fellow leaders to discuss issues relevant to today’s community-based arts administrators. Responding to this year’s Creative Conversation prompt, “how is the past shaping the future of the arts?.” awardees will give their insight on how their work impacts their community and organization.

    Roberto Bedoya

    Manager, Cultural Affairs, City of Oakland

    Roberto Bedoya is the Cultural Affairs Manager for the City of Oakland where he most recently shepherded   the City's Cultural Plan. - "Belonging in Oakland: A Cultural Development Plan". Through-out his career he has consistently supported artists-centered cultural practices and advocated for expanded definitions of inclusion and belonging in cultural sector. His essays ““Creative Placemaking and the Politics of Belonging and Dis-Belonging” ; “ Spatial Justice: Rasquachification, Race and the City” and “ "Poetics and Praxis of a City in Relation"  has reframed the discussion on cultural policy to shed light on exclusionary practices in cultural policy decision making. He is a Creative Placemaking Fellow at Arizona State University.

    Website: http://www2.oaklandnet.com/government/o/CityAdministration/d/economic-workforce-development/o/cultural-affairs/index.htm

    Lucas Antony Cowan (Moderator)

    Public Art Curator, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy

    Lucas became the Conservancy’s first Public Art Curator in 2014. Previously he directed the Public Art Program for the Maryland State Arts Council, where he spearheaded the passage of legislation requiring all state-funded capital project to include public art in their construction, and was the Senior Curator of Exhibits for Millennium Park and the Chicago Office of Tourism and Culture in Chicago, IL. He has curated and managed dozens of public art commissions and exhibitions of work by artists such as: Mark di Suvero, Jun Kaneko, Thomas Sayre, Shinique Smith, Sui Jianguo and Lawrence Weiner. Cowan has served on juries and panels across the United States, and has consulted on cultural park planning for cities such as San Francisco and Chicago. Cowan previously served on the board of trustees for the International Sculpture Center, publishers of Sculpture magazine, and is a founding member of the Advisory Council for Cold Hollow Sculpture Park in Vermont. Cowan holds degrees from the Maryland Institute College of Art and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

    Website: https://www.rosekennedygreenway.org/     

  • Ask an Expert: Conserving & Maintaining Public Artworks

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Event on 10/22/2019 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    Conservators have unique skills and knowledge that help public art administrators in caring for public art collections. For this live, online event attendees will have the opportunity to connect with two public art conservation experts to ask questions regarding the care and maintenance of public art collections. Participants will gain insight into what conservators do, how to find and work with conservators, ways they can help maintain their collection, and more!

    imageAbout this Conversation

    October 22, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Conservators have unique skills and knowledge that help public art administrators in caring for public art collections. For this live, online event attendees will have the opportunity to connect with two public art conservation experts to ask questions regarding the care and maintenance of public art collections. Participants will gain insight into what conservators do, how to find and work with conservators, ways they can help maintain their collection, and more!

    Learning Objectives

    • Hear from experts on how to conserve and maintain a public art collection
    • Learn about resources available for conservation and maintenance of public art collection

    Rosa Lowinger

    Chief Conservator and CEO, Rosa Lowinger & Associates DBA RLA Conservation of Art + Architecture

    Rosa Lowinger is Chief Conservator and CEO of RLA Conservation of Art + Architecture, a firm with offices in Miami and Los Angeles that serves the conservation needs of several dozen public art agencies nationwide. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, and the 2008-09 Rome Prize Fellow in Conservation at the American Academy in Rome where she conducted a pilot project researching the history of vandalism to public art and public space. Rosa’s career in public art conservation began in 1988 with the treatment of works at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall and continued with the first survey of public art for the City of Los Angeles in 1995. She presently serves as a consultant to over two-dozen public art agencies and the Getty Conservation Institute’s Outdoor Painted Sculpture Initiative, a forum that aims to codify the aesthetics and conservation protocols for care of painted sculpture. She is the author of Tropicana Nights: The Life and Times of the Legendary Cuban Nightclub (Harcourt, 2005).

    Website: www.rlaconservation.com

    Twitter: @RLAconservation

    Robert G. Lodge

    President, McKay Lodge Conservation Laboratory, Inc

    Bob holds a graduate degree in conservation and has been a conservator in Oberlin, Ohio for the past 36 years. He founded his company 31 years ago and now with a staff of 11 full-time employees is largely engaged in the conservation of outdoor sculpture and public art of diverse media. Because media is so diverse, many of the 7 conservator employees, including himself, has a material specialty, such as metals; casting; stone, mortars and cements; mosaics; electronics, electronic lighting and computers; FRP; industrial coatings; shop and location painting; and automotive finishes. The company operates The Ohio Conservation Center, a complex of three dedicated buildings and grounds with spaces and equipment necessary for rigging, craning, moving and working on the most monumental of artworks.

    Bob’s specialties have been industrial coatings on metals (specifications and inspections/failure analyses); relocation of endangered mosaics; and collection condition information management.

    For the past 22 years he and his company have been continuously in contract with the U.S. General Services Administration for the nation-wide conservation of government public sculptural fine art and significant architectural ornamentations (commissions dating back into the 19th century) as well as the public art commissions of the GSA Art-in-Architecture program.    

    Website: https://mckaylodge.com/

    Twitter: @ohioconcenter

  • Attracting College Students to the Arts

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/21/2019

    This session will explore tactics to increase engagement with students through social media, strategic partnerships, and data collection. Discover which channels college students are actually using and the benefits of campus influencers to increase reach and engagement. Also, explore tips and tricks on how to engage and grow your Instagram following on a college campus in a way that also feeds the algorithm. Even more powerful than the student to student connection, is when an arts event or opportunity is directly connected to an academic course as a mandatory experience or for extra credit. Learn a variety of approaches to engage professors and how to partner with campus-wide initiatives to incentivize attendance. Finally, take an inside look at “The Opinion Party,” a re-imagined focus group for students that was successfully piloted last year on the Western Carolina University campus. “The Opinion Party” specifically sought out students that self-identified as not participating in the arts to have an open discussion on how we can reach them better both through our programming and marketing. Please note that this webinar will be most beneficial for arts organizations that are part of a university or those that are located near a college campus and are looking to increase engagement.

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    About this Webinar

    This session will explore tactics to increase engagement with students through social media, strategic partnerships, and data collection. Discover which channels college students are actually using and the benefits of campus influencers to increase reach and engagement. Also, explore tips and tricks on how to engage and grow your Instagram following on a college campus in a way that also feeds the algorithm. Even more powerful than the student to student connection, is when an arts event or opportunity is directly connected to an academic course as a mandatory experience or for extra credit. Learn a variety of approaches to engage professors and how to partner with campus-wide initiatives to incentivize attendance. Finally, take an inside look at “The Opinion Party,” a re-imagined focus group for students that was successfully piloted last year on the Western Carolina University campus. “The Opinion Party” specifically sought out students that self-identified as not participating in the arts to have an open discussion on how we can reach them better both through our programming and marketing. Please note that this webinar will be most beneficial for arts organizations that are part of a university or those that are located near a college campus and are looking to increase engagement.

    Learning Objectives

    • Explore how to best use targeted social media on college campuses to increase engagement.
    • Figure out the best way to work with individual students than can act as influencers in the campus and in the community.
    • Learn how to establish cross-curricular connections and partnerships with campus groups/faculty members, increasing marketing reach to students.
    • Discover how old school marketing tactics can still work to reach the digital generation.

    Jill Jacobs

    Marketing Manager, Western Carolina University, Bardo Arts Center

    Jill Jacobs serves as the Marketing Manager for the Western Carolina University (WCU) Bardo Arts Center outside of Asheville, North Carolina. Bardo Arts Center features a 1,000 seat performance hall, black box theatre, and the WCU Fine Art Museum - an exhibiting and collecting institution with a 2500+ object collection. Jill is responsible for leading all marketing efforts of the arts center including all strategic planning, branding, design, social media, partnerships, paid advertising, community engagement, and sponsorships. In addition to her role at Bardo Arts Center, which began in July 2016, Jill serves as the Marketing Advisor to the WCU College of Fine and Performing Arts. Outside of full-time commitments, Jill is a budding environmentalist and co-owns a nature education and habitat restoration business with her husband called Spriggly’s Beescaping, where she leads marketing efforts including an informational website, educational videos, social media, and design.

    Jill's background is in performance, having earned her BFA in Acting with a Music Minor from Arcadia University in 2009. In 2013, Jill accepted a merit-based scholarship to Villanova University receiving her MA in Theatre and Certification in Non-Profit Management. Her professional career includes positions with fundraising companies, numerous performing arts organizations, and Please Touch Museum (The Children’s Museum of Philadelphia.) 

    Websites: arts.wcu.edu/marketing | www.sprigglys.com 

    Instagram: @bardoartscenter | @sprigglys_beescaping | @ginger_going_green 

    Facebook: @bardoartscenter | @sprigglys_beescaping

  • Arts and Community Development

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/18/2019

    Arts and community development requires a variety of partnerships and collaborations, often with individuals and groups from non-arts sectors. Understanding how socioeconomic, political and cultural values intersect is crucial to moving development forward; additionally, ambitious artistic endeavors can be stymied by a lack of funding and knowledge of local ordinances or public policies, and the inability to connect with valuable community stakeholders. Resourcing (beyond “money”) is foundational to the work of community-engaged development. Using real-world examples and Love Bank Park in St. Louis, MO as a case study, this webinar will explore how to identify assets, be proactive about potential challenges, and work with a variety of individuals to grow sustainable development through art-based projects and initiatives.

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     About this Webinar


    Arts and community development requires a variety of partnerships and collaborations, often with individuals and groups from non-arts sectors. Understanding how socioeconomic, political and cultural values intersect is crucial to moving development forward; additionally, ambitious artistic endeavors can be stymied by a lack of funding and knowledge of local ordinances or public policies, and the inability to connect with valuable community stakeholders. Resourcing (beyond “money”) is foundational to the work of community-engaged development. 

    Using real-world examples and Love Bank Park in St. Louis, MO as a case study, this webinar will explore how to identify assets, be proactive about potential challenges, and work with a variety of individuals to grow sustainable development through art-based projects and initiatives. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Exploration of arts-based development projects that work with (and benefit) both artists and non-artists alike.
    • Utilize inquiry processes to identify community needs and challenges.
    • Understand how to cultivate multilevel partnerships that can grow community-engaged, cross-sector collaborations.


    About the Series

    The arts make more things possible, from better education to greater health outcomes to a more civically-engaged citizenry—but people don’t always see the connection to the arts when change happens. From education and job security to housing, public safety, the military, and more, demonstrating the social impact of the arts and other sectors is increasingly important.  In this series, we will examine the social impact of the arts and other sectors. Join us each month for a new webinar and topic.

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Pacia Elaine (Anderson) is a St. Louis-based written, spoken, visual, and teaching Word Artist. She is a graduate of the Community Arts Training Institute, an Urban Bushwomen SLI Alumnus, a founding member of the art-based youth initiative Cherokee Street Reach, and serves as a Dean in the Zakatu Madrasa. Pacia is chair of the St. Louis Brick City Poetry Festival and a Missouri Regional Coordinator for the NEA-sponsored Poetry Out Loud youth recitation competition. Liaison for the Great Rivers Greenway Artists of Color Council, Pacia is also a consulting artist and facilitator with Americans for the Arts’ Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Pacia is a Steering Committee member for the Gravois-Jefferson Historic Neighborhoods Plan and does extensive community work in the Cherokee Street Community Improvement District. She has served as Curation Assistant to Inaugural St. Louis Poet Laureate Dr. Michael Castro, is a past Springboard to Learning Professional Development Facilitator for teaching artistsand has collaborated as a teaching artist and consultant with numerous schools, non-profit, and community-based organizations, both locally and nationally.  In 2016, Pacia released her first spoken word poetry album titled circa.ep. Her work has been published in collections, anthologies, and media such as Drumvoices RevueCrossing the Divide, and All the Art. Her first collection of poetry and writing is forthcoming.

  • Creative Conversation: Margie Johnson Reese

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/16/2019

    The Selina Roberts Ottum Award for Arts Leadership recognizes an individual working in arts management who has made a meaningful contribution to his or her local community and who exemplifies extraordinary leadership qualities. Margie Johnson Reese, museum educator and arts educator was selected as the 2019 Selina Roberts Ottum Awardee. In addition to her work in Wichita Falls, Margie continues to touch lives and influence cultural policy in cities across the country and around the world, creating a network of proselytes who pay it forward by following her approach to service. She is most proud of those she has mentored over the years – the young leaders who because of Margie’s guidance have learned to think boldly about their role in public service. Joined by Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Steering Committee Member, Phil Chan, the two will discuss how the past is shaping the future of arts leadership and learn more about Margie and her journey in the arts and culture field.

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    About this Creative Conversation


    2019 Selina Roberts Ottum Award for Arts Leadership 

    Margie Johnson Reese

    The Selina Roberts Ottum Award for Arts Leadership recognizes an individual working in arts management who has made a meaningful contribution to his or her local community and who exemplifies extraordinary leadership qualities. Margie Johnson Reese, museum educator and arts educator was selected as the 2019 Selina Roberts Ottum Awardee. In addition to her work in Wichita Falls, Margie continues to touch lives and influence cultural policy in cities across the country  and around the world, creating a network of proselytes who pay it forward by following her approach to service. She is most proud of those she has mentored over the years – the young leaders who because of Margie’s guidance have learned to think boldly about their role in public service. Joined by Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Steering Committee Member, Phil Chan, the two will discuss how the past is shaping the future of arts leadership and learn more about Margie and her journey in the arts and culture field.


    About the Series

    For 2019 National Arts & Humanities Month we are taking Creative Conversations to a new level. To engage with leaders in the field, this year’s National Arts Awardees will be in conversation with fellow leaders to discuss issues relevant to today’s community-based arts administrators. Responding to this year’s Creative Conversation prompt, “how is the past shaping the future of the arts?.” awardees will give their insight on how their work impacts their community and organization.

    Margie Johnson Reese

    Executive Director, Wichita Falls Alliance for Arts and Culture

    Margie Johnson Reese is an educator and life-long advocate for children and the arts. She has over 40 years’ experience in the field of arts administration, more than 17 of those heading a local arts agency. Margie received a BA from Washington State University in Pullman, Washington and an MFA in Theater from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, grounding her education in the arts.

    Margie’s career in arts administration and reputation as a leader was established within some of the field’s largest public institutions, including service as Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs for the City of Dallas and General Manager for the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs where she held her position under three Mayoral administrations. Her expertise as a grantmaker was tapped by the Ford Foundation to advance cultural projects in West Africa. Based in Lagos, Nigeria, her three-year appointment centered on cultural policy development and the conservation of West Africa’s tangible and intangible cultural heritage.

    Following her service in West Africa, Margie returned to Dallas and took the position of Vice President for Programs at Big Thought, a renowned arts learning organization she helped create 30 years ago.

    Today, she is leading a new venture to establish the Wichita Falls Alliance for Arts and Culture, a burgeoning local arts agency in Texas, as its executive director. She also manages MJR Partners, a private consulting firm focused on coaching and advising arts leaders and organizations in all areas of cultural management and policy development. Her firm has served a wide range of clients including the Houston Arts Alliance, One Columbia or Arts and  History, the Asante Children’s Theater in Indianapolis and is currently conducting a Cultural Equity Audit of the grant making functions for the City of Sacramento.

    Margie shares her expertise in arts administration as a faculty member for leadership programs organized by the National Guild for Community Arts Education and the Western States Arts Federation. She is a sought-after presenter, moderator and keynote speaker for meetings and arts conferences around the globe where she shares best practices and trends in the field. In addition, she has been an adjunct professor at the University of North Texas and continues as an adjunct professor at  Goucher College in their graduate school of arts administration.

    Over the years, Margie has contributed her time and talent to the boards of numerous nonprofit organizations, most notably as a member of the International Music Council in Paris; as an advisor to the International Council of African Museums; as a Fellow at the Salzburg Global Institute; Mid America Arts Alliance; and, as a 25-year member of the board of Americans for the Arts, where she chaired the Board’s Diversity Committee which authored the organization’s first Cultural Equity Statement.

    Margie is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana and has two adult children, a cherished grandson and a new one on the way.

    Phil Chan

    Director of Programming, IVY

    Phil Chan is the co-founder of Final Bow for Yellowface, and currently serves as the Director of Programming for IVY, connecting young professionals with leading American museums and performing arts institutions. He is a graduate of Carleton College and an alumnus of the Ailey School. As a writer, he served as the Executive Editor for FLATT Magazine and contributed to Dance Europe Magazine and the Huffington Post. He was the founding General Manager of the Buck Hill Skytop Music Festival, and was the General Manager for Armitage Gone! Dance and Youth America Grand Prix. He served multiple years on the National Endowment for the Arts dance panel and the Jadin Wong Award panel presented by the Asian American Arts Alliance, and is on the advisory committee for the Parsons Dance Company. He also serves on the Leaders of Color steering committee at Americans for the Arts.

    Websites: www.yellowface.org 

  • Supporting Individual Artists: LGBTQ Edition

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/10/2019

    The LGBTQ community is experiencing a moment of unprecedented visibility, and yet there remain many challenges and barriers to entry for LGBTQ artists. The City of West Hollywood has made a strong commitment to all artists and developed new programs focusing on the most underserved segments of the LGBTQ community. At the same time, the City has heard from the community that the Pride parade is becoming too commercial, and strove to balance that by creating a 40-day long LGBTQ Arts Festival which celebrates the history, art and culture of the LGBTQ community. Come hear from the City of West Hollywood regarding their specific efforts around individual LGBTQ artists, as well as from some of the grantees to hear what challenges are specific to the LGBTQ community and how best to support them.

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     About this Webinar

    The LGBTQ community is experiencing a moment of unprecedented visibility, and yet there remain many challenges and barriers to entry for LGBTQ artists. The City of West Hollywood has made a strong commitment to all artists and developed new programs focusing on the most underserved segments of the LGBTQ community. At the same time, the City has heard from the community that the Pride parade is becoming too commercial, and strove to balance that by creating a 40-day long LGBTQ Arts Festival which celebrates the history, art and culture of the LGBTQ community. Come hear from the City of West Hollywood regarding their specific efforts around individual LGBTQ artists, as well as from some of the grantees to hear what challenges are specific to the LGBTQ community and how best to support them.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Mike Che

    Arts Coordinator, City of West Hollywood

    Mike Che is the City of West Hollywood’s Arts Coordinator. He spearheaded the program design and launch of the City’s Transgender Arts Initiative grant, the only grant of its kind in the country. He also manages the City’s One City One Pride LGBTQ Arts Festival, a 40-day long celebration of the LGBTQ community through the arts. He is currently a member of the ONE Archives Culture Series Advisory Committee; the LA County Department of Arts and Culture’s Cultural Equity and Inclusion Initiative Advisory Committee; and AftA’s Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Steering Committee.

    Websites: www.weho.org/arts, www.weho.org/pride

    Social Media

    Twitter: @wehoarts  

    Instagram: @wehoarts

    Facebook: @wehoarts  

    Brian Sonia-Wallace

    Artist

    Brian Sonia-Wallace is the founder and convener of #PridePoets, started in conjunction with the City of West Hollywood’s One City One Pride initiative, and grown from Brian’s business RENT Poet, which brings poets on typewriters to events to write custom poems. Brian has written for tech companies and governments, toured nationally and internationally, and been the Writer-in-Residence for everyone from the Mall of America to Amtrak to the Boston Harbor Islands. His first book of essays, Dust Bowl Nation, tracks his journey to find humanity at the margins of America through poetry, and is forthcoming from Harper Collins in 2020. Brian lives in Los Angeles, and believes that typewriter poetry is inherently queer, blurring the lines between public and private, intimacy and stranger, permanence and ephemerality.

    Websites: rentpoet.com and pridepoets.com

    Social Media

    Instagram: @rentpoet and @pridepoets 

    Twitter:@rentpoet and @pridepoets

    Yozmit

    Artist

    The self-given name Yozmit means 'myth about one’s self' : Through her ritualistic performance art, Yozmit combines theater, dance, pop culture, fashion, gender identity, mythology, and shamanism onto a single canvas. She is currently working on DoYou project - an awareness-based performance art campaign. DoYou means 'Do'ing 'You' – a process of becoming fully self-realized and acting upon by balancing the Sacred Feminine and The Sacred Masculine, using gender and identity as a subject.

    Yozmit is a international headliner at The Box in New York City and London. She has shown her work at Hollywood Fringe Festival, One City One Pride Arts Festival, Coachella Music Festival, Burning Man, Lucent Dossier, Joyce Soho, Redcat (Roy and Edna Disney/ CalArts Theater), Movement Research at The Judson Church, St. Marks Church, Lincoln Center, Art Basel, ChunCheon International Mime Festival, Life Ball, Doma International Art Festival, Joe's Pub, Santos Party House, Galapagos Art Space, Dixon Place, Supper Club, Webster Hall, Sleep No More, Hotel Americano, Standard Hotel, Mondrian Hotel and various other venues in New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, London, Paris, Ibiza, Berlin, Vienna, Sofia and Seoul. In 2010, Yozmit performed in Marina Abramović’s “The Artist is Present” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), NYC. 

    Websitehttp://www.yozmit.com/

    Instagram: @Yozmit

    YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/yozmitube

  • Creating a World Without Youth Prisons: Using Arts to Center Youth Voice in the Justice Movement

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/08/2019

    How can we use arts to create a world without youth prisons? Performing Statistics is a cultural organizing project that uses art to model, imagine, and advocate for alternatives to youth incarceration. In this webinar, participants will learn how Performing Statistics is using art to center youth impacted by the juvenile justice system in the movement to close youth prisons and invest in communities. The Performing Statistics Co-Directors will explain their process of art-making with youth and how they partner with organizers and advocates to ensure that young people most impacted by the juvenile justice system are connected to policymakers.

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     About this Webinar

    How can we use arts to create a world without youth prisons? Performing Statistics is a cultural organizing project that uses art to model, imagine, and advocate for alternatives to youth incarceration. In this webinar, participants will learn how Performing Statistics is using art to center youth impacted by the juvenile justice system in the movement to close youth prisons and invest in communities. The Performing Statistics Co-Directors will explain their process of art-making with youth and how they partner with organizers and advocates to ensure that young people most impacted by the juvenile justice system are connected to policymakers. 

    Learning Objectives

    • To learn more about the Performing Statistics project and the urgency of the youth justice movement
    • To learn about strategies for using art to affect systems change
    • To discuss the importance of centering impacted populations in policy change work
    • To gather tools for working with system-involved youth

    Trey Hartt

    Project Director, Performing Statistics

    Project Director Trey Hartt is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. As Project Director he ensures that the project’s operations are consistent with its values and creative processes, that people are cared for and properly resourced, and that the young people in the project have the resources they need to stay resilient. In 2006, he began working with The Conciliation Project, a Richmond-based social justice theatre company that ignites dialogue about racism in America. From there he worked at Virginians for the Arts advocating for state funding for the arts, Alternate ROOTS as the Resources for Social Change program coordinator, and then at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities leading their fundraising efforts and programs for schools on issues of diversity and inclusion. Most recently, he was ART 180’s Deputy Director where he managed all administrative staff, led all fund development efforts, and supported special projects like Performing Statistics. Trey is Past President of Alternate ROOTS, a regional organization in the Southeast US that supports the creation and presentation of original art to eliminate oppression.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics

    Mark Strandquist

    Creative Director, Performing Statistics

    Creative Director Mark Strandquist is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. He ensures that the Performing Statistics creative processes are ethical, equitable, and rooted in radical imagination. A photographer and filmmaker by training, his work has received numerous awards, fellowships, national residencies, and reached wide audiences through The New York Times, The Guardian, NPR, The Washington Post, PBS Newshour, VICE, and a multitude of other news outlets. At the core of his practice is the belief that those most impacted by the criminal justice system are the experts society needs to listen to, and that by connecting those directly affected with a multitude of community experts and political stakeholders, change can be created on personal and systemic levels. In 2016, he and his partner Courtney Bowles were awarded A Blade of Grass fellowship for Socially Engaged Art to begin the Philadelphia Reentry Think Tank. Mark continues to co-direct the Reentry Think Tank in Philly in addition to the People’s Paper Co-Op.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics

    Gina Lyles

    Engagement Director, Performing Statistics

    Engagement Director Gina Lyles is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. She supports the human-to-human connections that ground Performing Statistics in authentic relationships with youth, credible messenger mentors, and partners. Gina leverages her own life experiences as a self-described, “school-to-prison pipeline survivor” in and out of the foster care and juvenile justice systems since the age of eight, to navigate and empower youth caught in the school-to-prison pipeline. She began her journey with Performing Statistics at ART 180 as a program assistant for a hip hop class using her skills as an emcee and rapper to support kids at the middle school level. She soon was leading her own hip hop music and writing programs. When Performing Statistics was founded in 2014, Gina was the first program leader assisting in the implementation of the earliest creative programs and was promoted to Program Coordinator in 2015 after the project received its first major grant. After just a year, Gina became Program Manager and helped grow the project with a particular emphasis on the youth development and credible messenger mentoring aspects. Gina left ART 180 in 2019 to launch her own business, So Focused Consulting, LLC, before becoming the Performing Statistics Engagement Director.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics