Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Website Optimization Without A Redesign

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/11/2018

    Optimizing your website doesn't always mean a complete redesign. This session will equip you with strategies and methodology on how you can make small changes to your website that deliver big results. You'll learn how to achieve the highest return on your efforts and how to track the results.

    image About this Webinar

    October 11, 2018 at 3:00PM EDT

    Optimizing your website doesn't always mean a complete redesign. This session will equip you with strategies and methodology on how you can make small changes to your website that deliver big results. You'll learn how to achieve the highest return on your efforts and how to track the results. 

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will learn...

    • How users interact with website content
    • Best practices for design and typography
    • How to optimize your landing pages
    • Which Google Analytics reports you should be looking at

    You'll leave this session with concrete and achievable takeaways that you can implement right away on your website.

    Ceci Dadisman

    Digital Marketing Manager, FORM

    Ceci Dadisman has 15 years of experience successfully marketing the arts and nonprofits utilizing innovative and cutting-edge initiatives. Currently the Digital Marketing Manager at FORM and the President of Cardinal + Company, she is nationally recognized as a leader in her field and specializes in the integration of digital marketing and technology into traditional marketing methods.


    A frequent public speaker, Ceci is known for her easy-going and vernacular style and she creates open learning environments with an emphasis on information sharing and useful takeaways. She is also a senior contributor to Arts Hacker where she regularly shares timely information and step-by-step tutorials.


    She is on the Arts Midwest Conference Professional Development Committee, the NTEN 2018 Conference Session Advisory Committee, is the Immediate Past Chapter Leader and Chapter Founder of the West Palm Beach Chapter of Girl Develop It, the Immediate Past President of the South Florida Chapter of the American Marketing Association, and served for many years on the National Arts Marketing Project Advisory Committee and as the OPERA America Marketing Network Chair.  She also currently serves on the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts Visiting Committee.


    WEBSITE: https://theformgroup.com/

    TWITTER: @CeciDadisman

    EMAIL: ceci@theformgroup.com

  • Private Sector Network Call: Equitable Funding Models and the Creative Economy

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    The Private Sector Network is open to all Americans for the Arts members who are interested in programming related to the intersection of arts and business. Conference calls serve as a way for members to connect regularly, learn about initiatives that engage the private sector and learn from colleagues.

    image September 2018 

    Private Sector Network Call

    September 26, 2018 at 2:00PM EDT

    This is the third installment of our 2018 quarterly Private Sector Network Conference Calls focusing on the topic: Equitable Funding Models and the Creative Economy. This year’s series focuses on the creative economy, what it means, and what program models exist that can serve as examples for how to explore this work in your community.

    The Private Sector Network is open to all AFTA members who are interested in programming related to the intersection of arts and business. Conference calls serve as a way for members to connect regularly, learn about initiatives that engage the private sector and learn from colleagues. 

    Participants on this call will have the opportunity to hear from Kerry Adams Hapner, Director of Cultural Affairs for the City of San Jose, as she discusses San Jose’s Creative Industries Fund. We’ll also hear from Kristin Larsen, Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Chicago will discuss the Arts & Business Council’s work to identify imbalances in equitable access to arts and culture, and funding and engagement opportunities for arts and culture institutions serving African, Latino(a), Asian, Arab, and Native American (ALAANA) populations. 

    Want to join this call, but aren't a member? Visit the membership page of our website or reach out to our membership team at (202) 371-2830 or membership@artsusa.org to become a member and join this call.

    Kristin Larsen

    Executive Director, Arts & Business Council of Chicago

    Kristin Larsen is the Executive Director of the Arts & Business Council of Chicago. Kristin was the Executive Director of Remy Bumppo Theater Company from 2002 to 2012 and most recently the Executive Director of Stage 773, a performance venue in Lakeview. Kristin has her BFA in production management from The Theatre School, DePaul University and her MA in facilitating organizational effectiveness in the arts from DePaul University’s School for New Learning. Kristin volunteers with DePaul’s Alumni Sharing Knowledge program, the Joseph Jefferson Awards Committee, and the Unitarian Church of Evanston, where she is also a member. As an only child growing up in unincorporated Will County, she participated in all sorts of art making. Left to her own devices, she was often found slathering mud on boards and affixing such things as wildflowers, pebbles and bird feathers. Today her art making includes gardening, needlepoint, and elaborate EXCEL spreadsheets. If you think Kristin can be of service, please connect with her. If you don’t reach her straightaway, she’s likely out of her mobile’s service area camping, canoeing and stargazing.

    Kerry Adams Hapner

    Director of Cultural Affairs, City of San Jose

    The mission of the Office of Cultural Affairs is to champion the arts and cultural vitality for San Jose’s one million ethnically diverse residents and its visitors.  Her portfolio includes public art, creative placemaking, special events, cultural funding, convention and cultural facility management, creative entrepreneurship, conventions and visitor bureau, and the creative economy.   

    In 2014 and 2015, Kerry was named one of the most powerful and influential leaders in the United States’ nonprofit arts sector in Barry’s Blog, published by the Western States Arts Federation.  Kerry earned her degree in art history and business administration at UCLA. Currently, she is pursuing an interdisciplinary master in liberal arts degree at Stanford University. 

    Jessica Stern (Moderator)

    Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Jessica is the Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager with Americans for the Arts. Prior to this position, she acted as the Membership and Resources Manager for the Nonprofit Association of Oregon (NAO), providing oversight of NAO’s statewide membership program while curating and reinventing its online platform of nonprofit management best practice resources. Prior to NAO, Jessica spent nearly five years working with Portland’s local business committee for the arts, Business for Culture & the Arts (BCA), delivering programs that engaged employees from BCA’s 200+ business members, managing all marketing and communications strategies, and retaining and cultivating corporate and community partnerships. Jessica has also served in development roles at Metropolitan Youth Symphony and Literary Arts; and has freelanced as an independent web designer and developer.

  • Exploring and Applying BEA Creative Economy Research and Tools

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/27/2018

    When speaking to decision-makers, particularly public sector officials, the subject of return of investment in public dollars frequently arises, along for the need for easy-to-read data from reputable sources as evidence. In an effort to strengthen the economic impact of the arts and culture sector the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) was developed via partnership with the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). ACPSA allows users to track economic activity, as well as the overall impact of arts and culture on U.S. and state economies. Using the 2015 ACPSA data, the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) then developed an interactive dashboard allows you to explore state-level ACPSA data through figures.

    image About this Webinar

    September 27, 2018 at 3:00PM

    When speaking to decision-makers, particularly public sector officials, the subject of return of investment in public dollars frequently arises, along for the need for easy-to-read data from reputable sources as evidence. 

    The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) was developed through a partnership with the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the United States Department of Commerce (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in a concerted effort to illustrate the economic impact of the arts and culture sector. ACPSA allows users to track economic activity, as well as the overall impact of arts and culture on U.S. and state economies. Using the 2015 ACPSA data, the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) then developed an interactive dashboard that allows you to explore state-level ACPSA data through visually impactful charts and figures.

    After delving deeper into the impactful ACPSA data and resources from the NEA and NASAA, state arts leaders will discuss how they are already using the tools in their programmatic, policy, and outreach work.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will learn about the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account methodology and results
    • Attendees will explore the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies dashboard
    • Attendees will receive examples of how to apply research in policy and outreach work

    This presentation is jointly curated by Americans for the Arts and the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, with special remarks from the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Sunil Iyengar

    Research & Analysis Director, National Endowment for the Arts

    Sunil Iyengar directs the Office of Research & Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts. Since his arrival at the NEA in June 2006, the office has produced more than 25 research publications, hosted several research events and webinars, twice updated the NEA's five-year strategic plan, and overseen a new and expanded survey about arts participation. In that time, the office also has created an arts system map and long-term research agenda, and has launched a research grants program. Sunil also chairs the Interagency Task Force on the Arts and Human Development. Some of the NEA’s most recent research includes Valuing the Art of Industrial Design (2013), The Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth (2012),  An Average Day in the Arts (2012), and The Arts and Human Development (2011). Sunil and his team have partnered with organizations such as the Brookings Institution, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Institutes to Health to study the arts in relation to such topics as economic development and the health and well-being of older adults. For a decade, Iyengar worked as a reporter, managing editor, and senior editor for a host of news publications covering the biomedical research, medical device, and pharmaceutical industries. He writes poetry, and his book reviews have appeared in publications such as the Washington PostNew York TimesSan Francisco ChronicleThe American ScholarThe New CriterionEssays in Criticism, and Contemporary Poetry Review. Iyengar has a BA in English from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

    Website: https://www.arts.gov

    Twitter: @NEAarts

    Ryan Stubbs

    Research Director, National Assembly of State Arts Agencies

    Ryan Stubbs directs NASAA’s research team to provide high-quality information for the benefit of state arts agencies and the arts and culture field. His areas of expertise include public funding for the arts, state policy and the creative economy as well as state arts agency funding, services, operations and grant making. He oversees a research portfolio that includes dynamic data visualization tools, field surveys and research customized to the needs of state arts agencies. Ryan also represents state arts agencies and NASAA at state, regional and NASAA research forums and serves as NASAA’s primary research liaison to federal agencies, foundations, consultants and scholars conducting research on public support for the arts.

    Ryan has more than 10 years of professional experience in the field of arts research. Prior to joining NASAA, he served as the director of research for the Western States Arts Federation, where he specialized in analyzing state and local creative economy data, implemented web based research technology and launched an initiative aimed at supporting independent music. Ryan has experience in state government as a capital construction analyst for the Colorado Department of Higher Education and in economic development as a business manager for Adams County, Colorado. He holds master’s degrees in public administration and urban and regional planning with an emphasis in economic development planning from the University of Colorado, Denver.

    Ryan serves on the board of directors for his local community development corporation and is on the steering committee for the Cultural Research Network. Ryan considers himself a musician of questionable accomplishment and lives in Mt. Rainier, Maryland, with his daughter, Wren, and his wife, Robin—an unquestionably accomplished visual artist.

    Website: https://nasaa-arts.org

    Twitter: @NASAA_Arts    

    Crystal Young-Otterstrom

    Executive Director, Utah Cultural Alliance

    A two-time Enlightened 50 (E-50) recipient from the Community Foundation of Utah, Crystal Young-Otterstrom     is a certified Utah Change Leader, was named one of Utah Business Magazine’s 40 under 40 in 2013, and has been featured as a Utah’s Educated Woman of the Week and profiled in the publication, IN Utah This Week. Crystal is the Executive Director of Utah Cultural Alliance, the statewide advocacy voice for the arts, humanities, and cultural businesses of Utah. C Crystal serves on the boards, advisory councils, or steering committees of Salty Cricket Composers Collective (co-founder and board chair), Utah Democratic Party Treasurer (an elected position), Americans for the Arts’ SAAN Council (State Arts Advocacy Network), Utah Women & Politics PAC, LDS Dems of America (emeritus co-chair), LDS Dems-Utah (emeritus chair), one of the managing editors of MormonPress.com, BYU Political Affairs Society - UT chapter (co-chair), Utah Arts & Cultural Coalition, Alliance for a Better Utah, Musinia, UTOPIA Early Music, and Planned Parenthood Association of Utah. Crystal serves on the School Community Council of Emerson Elementary, which is the decision making body for the school. Past work experience: Crystal spent eight years as a marketing, campaign, and event planning consultant at Brand.Pink and was the Audience Development Manager at Utah Symphony | Utah Opera for seven years before that. Crystal is a composer and coloratura soprano. She earned her bachelors in music theory with minors in humanities, economics, and marketing as an undergrad at Brigham Young University and earned her masters in musicology and composition from the Aaron Copland School of Music (Queens College, City University of New York).

    Website: http://www.utahculturalalliance.org/

    Twitter: @utahculture

    Garbo Hearne

    Past Chair and Chair, Arkansas Arts Council and Arkansans for the Arts

    Garbo Watson Hearne owns Hearne Fine Art and Pyramid Art, Books & Custom Framing/Hearne Fine Art, located in the historic Dunbar neighborhood in Little Rock, Arkansas. She developed Hearne Fine Art in the New York and Atlanta markets and expanded its services to include cataloguing and fine art appraisals. In 2005, Hearne earned her certification in appraisal studies from New York University. In 2008, she and her husband, Dr. Archie Hearne, published Collaborations, Two Decades of African American Art: Hearne Fine Art 1988 – 2008. Before opening Pyramid Gallery in 1988, Hearne worked as a pediatric intensive care nurse at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. She is a board member of the Mid-America Arts Alliance has served on the board of the Arkansas Humanities Council. She received a B.S.N. in nursing from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. 

    Website: http://arkansansforthearts.org

    Twitter: @HearneFineArt88   

    Bureau of Economic Analysis Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account: https://bea.gov/regional/arts-and-culture/

    National Endowment for the Arts’ U.S. Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account Arts Data Profiles: https://www.arts.gov/artistic-fields/research-analysis/arts-data-profiles/arts-data-profile-16

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies’ Creative Economy State Profiles: https://nasaa-arts.org/nasaa_research/creative-economy-state-profiles/

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies' Creative Economy Resources: https://nasaa-arts.org/research/creative-economy/

    Americans for the Arts’ Creative Industries: Business & Employment in the Arts reports: https://www.americansforthearts.org/by-program/reports-and-data/research-studies-publications/creative-industries 

    Americans for the Arts’ Arts and Economic Prosperity 5 Report: https://www.americansforthearts.org/by-program/reports-and-data/research-studies-publications/arts-economic-prosperity-5

    State of Utah Cultural Reports: www.utculture.org/stats

  • Building a Community through Psychological Safety

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/24/2018

    Join Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham, Co-Founder & Creative Director of Museum Hue, as she discusses the importance of psychological safety. She will also discuss how Museum Hue, which has created a community of creatives from all over the world, has helped create such space for people of color through the arts sector.

    image About this Webinar

    September 24, 2018 at 3:00PM (EDT)

    Creating an environment where people feel comfortable taking risks is key to fostering cutting edge, forward thinking organizations. In this regard, the term “psychological safety” is becoming more widely used as it relates to the workplace and groups. This is partly thanks to a study in which Google identified psychological safety as the most important factor in creating a great team. Join Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham, Co-Founder & Creative Director of Museum Hue, as she discusses the importance of psychological safety. She will also discuss how Museum Hue, which has created a community of creatives from all over the world, has helped create such space for people of color through the arts sector. 

    Learning Objectives:

    Participants will learn about the concept of psychological safety.

    Participants will learn about Museum Hue and their work in creating psychological safe spaces, its benefits and challenges.

    Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham

    Co-Founder & Creative Director, Museum Hue

    Stephanie is an agent for arts and culture forever in a state of exploration, investigation, preservation, and creation. She works to paint a larger portrait of the arts world and introduce new ways of seeing and thinking about arts and culture. Stephanie utilizes museums and other cultural entities as a medium for discussions, but her messages transcends beyond gallery walls

    and performance halls to spark curiosity, create an echo chamber, demystify the field, and reflects on power and privilege as it relates to the arts sector. She is also the Co-Founder and Creative Director of Museum Hue, an organization dedicated to the advancement of people of color through the arts. Stephanie has written about her work for Curator: The Museum Journal, Museums and Social Issues Journal, and the Center for the Future of Museums blog as well as headlined talks at the American Alliance of Museums and Museum Next conferences.

    Twitter Handle: @museumhue and @stephaniecunning 

    Website: www.museumhue.com and www.stephaniecunningham.com

    Links to Stephanie Johnson-Cunningham's Writings

    Curator Museum Journal Article featuring a review on Susan Cahan's book, Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power

    Museums and Social Issues Article: Beyond Gallery Walls and Performance Halls: Five Essential Steps Museums and Other Cultural Institutions Must Take to Center People, Communities, and Cultivate Effective Societal Change


    Other Relevant Resources

    Google’s “Project Aristotle”  about Psychological Safety: https://rework.withgoogle.com/print/guides/5721312655835136/

    Amy Edmondson's, who coined the term psychological safety, Ted Talk: https://youtu.be/LhoLuui9gX8

    Article on developing a psychological safety and speak up culture: https://cultureplusconsulting.com/2018/03/10/how-to-develop-psychological-safety/

  • Artists and Planning Civic Spaces

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Through this webinar, explore how artists can be a vital part of community engagement and the development of a civic space planning process. Through the example of bulidingcommunityWorkshops (BCWorkshops) in Dallas, Texas whose tagline is design justice through community engagement, learn how to incorporate artists within a civic design planning process.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    Available: September 21, 2018

    Through this webinar, explore how artists can be a vital part of community engagement and the development of a civic space planning process. Through the experinence of bulidingcommunityWorkshops (bcWorkshops) in Dallas, Texas who focus on design justice through community engagement, learn how to incorporate artists within a civic design planning process.

    Learning Objective:

    • To provide practices and examples of integrating artists in community engagement processes for planning and design of civic spaces.

    After registering, be sure to check out further resources and handouts in the tabs above. You can download a PDF of this presentation in the "Handouts" tab and see additional resources on the "Resources" tab.

    image

    Elizabeth "Lizzie" MacWillie

    Associate Director, bcWorkshop

    Lizzie MacWillie is an Associate Director at  buildingcommunityWORKSHOP. Lizzie heads up People Organizing Place (POP), the participatory city shaping initiative of [bc] that positions local stakeholders as experts to proactively shape their neighborhood’s future.

    Lizzie brings to the team critical design experience managing [bc]’s multi-year creative placemaking initiative, Activating Vacancy, an initiative focused on bringing people together to share food, stories, art, experience, and histories as well as enabling neighbors to talk, to learn, and to organize.  This activation leads to cultural, physical, and political changes that can revitalize neighborhoods, improve infrastructure and bring economic benefits to residents.

    Prior to joining [bc]in her current role, Lizzie was a part of OMA/AMO in Rotterdam, NL, as aneditor of “Elements of Architecture” by Rem Koolhaas, a collection of books about 15 basic units of architecture. She received a Master of Architecture in Urban Design and a Master of Design Studies in Art, Design and the Public Domain from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, and a Bachelor of Architecture from Carnegie Mellon University.

    image

    Patricia Walsh

    Public Art & Civic Design Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Patricia Walsh joined Americans for the Arts in 2014. She works to empower public art professionals, artists and other stakeholders in the implementation of public art in the built environment through the use of best practices, case studies, resource development, and peer-to-peer networking.

    In her role at Americans for the Arts, Patricia has grown the annual Public Art Preconference
    to over 300 attendees, moderates a 400+ membership network of public art professionals and travels frequently to communities across the country to engage and learn from her colleagues working locally. She manages partnerships with Smart Growth America/Transportation for America and the American Planning Association, and continues to develop strategies to engage allied fields to cultivate policy and practice that supports public art in communities across the country.

    Prior to arriving in D.C., Patricia lived and worked in many communities across the US. She held positions in public art for the Arts Commission for the City of Las Vegas and the City of San Jose Public Art Program. She served on the City of Palo Alto Public Art Commission, as a committee member for genARTS Silicon Valley, an initiative of the Arts Council Silicon Valley dedicated to serving emerging leaders, and volunteered with the City of Oakland public art
    program.

    Born in Vermont, Patricia grew up near Poughkeepsie, New York, holds a Masters of Science in Arts Administration from Boston University and a Bachelor in Arts in painting from State University of New York at Plattsburgh. She has also enjoyed time living in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  • September 2018 Member Briefing: Online Sales Tax Implications for Artists and Arts Organizations

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Join us for this member only briefing!

    image September 2018 Member Briefing

    September 18, 2018 at 3:00PM

    About the Member Briefing

    Member Briefings are our monthly opportunity to talk to you about what’s happening now! Mark your calendars for the third Tuesday of every month at 3pm to stay up-to-date on what’s happening at Americans for the Arts and across the sector. For this month’s call we will be joined by Kate McClanahan, Director of Federal Affairs at Americans for the Arts. Kate will be discussing the changes to online sales tax processes and the implications on artists and organizations. 

    These calls are for you, so please let us know if there’s a topic you’d like to know more about by contacting Cristyn Johnson at cjohnson@artsusa.org.

    We firmly believe that our #AFTAmember network is one of our strongest resources, so after our update, we’ll open the floor up to your questions, comments, recommendations, and lessons learned – we hope you’ll take advantage of each other’s expertise!

    If you will be viewing the live event on your ipad or iphone you will need to download the MobileMeetings APP By E-STREAM.COM, Inc. and enter the meeting number:547798

    Presenters:

    image

    Kate McClanahan, Director of Federal Affairs, Americans for the Arts

    image

    Cristyn Johnson, Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Breaking Down the South Dakota v. Wayfair Decision ARTSBlog Post

    Etsy Advocacy Campaigns

    States Could Gain Revenue from Expanded Authority, but Business are Likely to Experience Compliance Costs -- report by US Government Accountability Office

    Articles:

    Elisabeth Dorman, State and Local Government Affairs Manager is helping to track states that have changed policies based on this new case. Click here to email Elisabeth to find out more of let her know of changes to your state laws.

  • Embrace the Cycle of Mentorship Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    September 14, 2018

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.  The research was intended to inform the development of programming to assist in skill building for intergenerational dialogue, and to support the concept of cyclical mentorship among new and seasoned leaders in the arts education field. The research revealed five key themes, and this webinar will focus on the skills necessary for EMBRACING THE CYCLE OF MENTORSHIP. 

    Learning Objective:

    • Explore the findings of ‘Cyclical Mentorship in Arts Education Leadership’ research;
    • Illuminate existing tools and resources in the nonprofit, arts, and education sectors to hone skills in this area; and
    • Hear strong examples and cogent advice from emerging and veteran leaders in the arts education field.

    image

    Jeff M. Poulin

    Arts Education Program Manager, Americans for the Arts  

    Jeff M. Poulin leads the Arts Education Program at American for the Arts, where he works to advance local, state, and federal policies supportive of equitable access to arts education throughout the United States. In his role, Jeff trains over 10,000 people annually, publishes research and policy analysis, manages strategic partnerships, and leads networks of stakeholders.

    With over a decade of experience as a performer, teaching artist, education researcher, and arts administrator, Jeff’s work is grounded in social justice and seeks transformative policy solutions to society’s most-challenging problems. Jeff is widely published, serves as a reviewer for grant and research panels, and speaks to audiences across the country and around the globe.

    Jeff hails from Portland, Maine is a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts (UK). He holds degrees in arts management, cultural policy, and education from Oklahoma City University, University College Dublin, and the University of Glasgow.  

    image

    Quanice G. Floyd

    Quanice G. Floyd is a renaissance woman who wears many capes. Born and raised in NYC, she has spent over a decade in Washington, DC where she has received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Music Education from Howard University and Kent State University respectively. Her passion for arts administration led her to pursue her second Master’s degree in Arts Management at American University and is currently a doctoral student at Drexel University. Quanice is a public-school music educator where she teaches elementary school general music, chorus, band, and orchestra. She is also the Founder & Director of the Arts Administrators of Color Network, an organization committed to empowering artists and arts administrators by advocating for access, diversity, inclusion, and equity in the arts in the DC and Baltimore metropolitan areas. Quanice also serves as a board member for two DC arts organizations, and is an alumna of the ArtEquity Facilitator Cohort, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s Music Educators Academy, Arts Administrators Academy, 4pt0 Schools Essentials Program, and the Arts Education Collaborative’s Leadership Academy. She is working endlessly towards her goals of becoming an arts education expert and advocate by providing a quality education to DC’s at-promise student populations by establishing and leading a school dedicated to the arts.

  • Inspire Others to Action Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    September 13, 2018

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.  The research was intended to inform the development of programming to assist in skill building for intergenerational dialogue, and to support the concept of cyclical mentorship among new and seasoned leaders in the arts education field. The research revealed five key themes, and this webinar will focus on the skills necessary for INSPIRING OTHERS TO ACTION.

    Learning Objective:

    • Explore the findings of ‘Cyclical Mentorship in Arts Education Leadership’ research;
    • Illuminate existing tools and resources in the nonprofit, arts, and education sectors to hone skills in this area; and
    • Hear strong examples and cogent advice from emerging and veteran leaders in the arts education field.

    image

    Jeff M. Poulin

    Arts Education Program Manager, Americans for the Arts  

    Jeff M. Poulin leads the Arts Education Program at American for the Arts, where he works to advance local, state, and federal policies supportive of equitable access to arts education throughout the United States. In his role, Jeff trains over 10,000 people annually, publishes research and policy analysis, manages strategic partnerships, and leads networks of stakeholders.

    With over a decade of experience as a performer, teaching artist, education researcher, and arts administrator, Jeff’s work is grounded in social justice and seeks transformative policy solutions to society’s most-challenging problems. Jeff is widely published, serves as a reviewer for grant and research panels, and speaks to audiences across the country and around the globe.

    Jeff hails from Portland, Maine is a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts (UK). He holds degrees in arts management, cultural policy, and education from Oklahoma City University, University College Dublin, and the University of Glasgow. 


    image

     

    Courtney J. Boddie

    Director of Education/School Engagement, The New Victory Theater

    Courtney J. Boddie, New Victory Director of Education/School Engagement, oversees all programs related to school communities including the New Victory Education Partnership program, teacher professional development training in the performing arts and professional development of 55+ New Victory Teaching Artists. During her tenure, The New Victory Theater received the Americans for the Arts Outstanding Education program award (2008) and a special Drama Desk Award (2012) for “...nurturing a love of theater in young people.” Ms. Boddie is the Creator and Host of Teaching Artistry with Courtney J. Boddie, a monthly podcast featuring engaging and investigative interviews, roundtable conversations and panels with artists and arts education leaders. She is an adjunct professor at New York University and The New School. Ms. Boddie was President of the Association of Teaching Artists (ATA) 2015 to 2017 and is currently on the Board of Directors (Treasurer, 2018-19). Additionally, she serves on the Teaching Artist Committee of the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable, the editorial board for the Teaching Artist Journal and is a Women’s Center Media SheSource. Prior to joining The New Victory Theater in 2003, Ms. Boddie was Program Associate for Empire State Partnerships (NYSCA) and a teaching artist for Roundabout Theatre Company. She received her Master’s degree from the Educational Theatre Graduate Program at New York University.


  • Broaden and Diversify the Leadership Pipeline Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    September 12, 2018

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.  The research was intended to inform the development of programming to assist in skill building for intergenerational dialogue, and to support the concept of cyclical mentorship among new and seasoned leaders in the arts education field. The research revealed five key themes, and this webinar will focus on the skills necessary for BROADENING AND DIVERSIFYING THE LEADERSHIP PIPELINE.

    Learning Objective:

    • Explore the findings of ‘Cyclical Mentorship in Arts Education Leadership’ research;
    • Illuminate existing tools and resources in the nonprofit, arts, and education sectors to hone skills in this area; and
    • Hear strong examples and cogent advice from emerging and veteran leaders in the arts education field.

    Jeff M. Poulin

    Arts Education Program Manager, Amerians for the Arts


    Jeff M. Poulin joined the arts education team at Americans for the Arts in 2013. He works to empower local, state and federal supporters of arts education to become effective advocates to advance policies supportive of equitable access to arts education for all students.

    In his role at Americans for the Arts, Jeff has trained over 10,000 advocates in all 50 states.  He was also been instrumental in the publication of the 2014 National Core Arts Standards, a leader in the creative youth development movement, and a founding board member of the Innovation Collaborative. Before arriving in D.C., Jeff worked for several nonprofit and commercial organizations in the US and abroad focused primarily in production and programming, audience development, research and policy. Notably, he was an advisor on the implementation of the first national Arts in Education Charter under the directions of the Ministers of Arts and Education in the Republic of Ireland. Jeff frequently speaks at a number of nonprofit organizations and universities.

    Jeff hails from Portland, Maine and holds a Master of Arts degree in Arts Management and Cultural Policy from University College Dublin and a Bachelor of Science degree in Entertainment Business from Oklahoma City University

    Tamara Alvarado

    Executive Director, School of Arts & Culture at the Mexican Heritage Plaza

    Prior to serving as the Executive Director for the School of Arts & Culture at the Mexican Heritage Plaza, Tamara was the Director of Multicultural Leadership for 1stACT Silicon Valley. From 2003 to 2008 she served as Executive Director of MACLA/Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana in San Jose, California. From 1999 – 2003 she served as Program Director for the newly opened Washington United Youth Center, a partnership between Catholic Charities and the City of San Jose. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Western State Arts Federation. Tamara is also co-founder of the Multicultural Arts Leadership Institute, a leadership development program for people of color working in arts, culture and entertainment. A traditional Aztec dancer for the past 14 years, she is a member of Calpulli Tonalehqueh Danza Azteca of San Jose. Tamara holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish Literature from Stanford University.

  • Develop a Facilitator’s Role Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    September 11, 2018

    In 2017, Americans for the Arts conducted research to illuminate effective practices of emerging and veteran leaders in the field of arts education to explore strategies toward broadening and diversifying the leadership pipeline.  The research was intended to inform the development of programming to assist in skill building for intergenerational dialogue, and to support the concept of cyclical mentorship among new and seasoned leaders in the arts education field. The research revealed five key themes, and this webinar will focus on the skills necessary for DEVELOPING A FACILITATOR’S ROLE.

    Learning Objective:

    • Explore the findings of ‘Cyclical Mentorship in Arts Education Leadership’ research;
    • Illuminate existing tools and resources in the nonprofit, arts, and education sectors to hone skills in this area; and
    • Hear strong examples and cogent advice from emerging and veteran leaders in the arts education field.

    image

    Jeff M. Poulin

    Arts Education Program Manager, Americans for the Arts  

    Jeff M. Poulin leads the Arts Education Program at American for the Arts, where he works to advance local, state, and federal policies supportive of equitable access to arts education throughout the United States. In his role, Jeff trains over 10,000 people annually, publishes research and policy analysis, manages strategic partnerships, and leads networks of stakeholders.

    With over a decade of experience as a performer, teaching artist, education researcher, and arts administrator, Jeff’s work is grounded in social justice and seeks transformative policy solutions to society’s most-challenging problems. Jeff is widely published, serves as a reviewer for grant and research panels, and speaks to audiences across the country and around the globe.

    Jeff hails from Portland, Maine is a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts (UK). He holds degrees in arts management, cultural policy, and education from Oklahoma City University, University College Dublin, and the University of Glasgow.  


    image

    Nicole Amri

    Program Director, SAY SEmerging Leader in Arts Education

    Nicole Amri is a 2006 alumna of SAY Sí and a 2012 graduate from the University of Texas at San Antonio with a BFA in Painting and a BA in Communication: Public Relations. She is also a certified nonprofit professional through the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance. Driven by learning and creating, Nicole’s great passions are education and the arts. As a multidisciplinary artist she explores human rights issues with a focus on interpersonal relationships and societal conditions. In addition to her position as Program Director for SAY Sí, Nicole currently serves on local and national committees such as city-wide collective impact initiatives: SA2020 and Excel Beyond the Bell SA and national groups: the ALAANA Network and National Advisory Committee to the Creative Youth Development National Partnership. When she’s not working or creating, Nicole loves to dance, cook and listen to music (often at the same time).