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  • Promoting Appreciation for the Role of Arts in Health and Wellness

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    As arts advocates work to make the case for support of the arts, one of the best arguments is that of social impact. With benefits far beyond enrichment and enjoyment, one social impact area gaining attention is the intersection of arts and health. Americans for the Arts partnered with Topos and Metris Arts Consulting to launch a research project summarizing existing research and example projects in the arts and health realm. Join us on June 7 at 2pm EDT for a webinar with Margy Waller, Senior Fellow with Topos Partnership and Clay Lord, VP of Local Arts Advancement with Americans for the Arts, as we explore the findings of this report.

    image About this Webinar

    June 7, 2019 at 2:00PM EDT

    Arts advocates around the country work hard to make the case that creative venues, activities and professionals should receive strong support. One of the most important yet underutilized advocacy arguments is the social impact of the arts—the benefits that go beyond enjoyment and enrichment of individual participants. Among these social impacts are benefits to individual and community health, which are increasingly a focus of social science research and evaluation.

    In partnership with Topos and Metris Arts Consulting, Americans for the Arts launched a research project to produce a document summarizing existing research and example projects at the intersection of arts and health. This research report qualitatively explores Americans’ current thinking about the connection between arts and health, and their responses to communications about this topic. Conversations with a diverse cross-section of individuals in the Twin Cities give us important insights into how a conversation about the arts-health connection may play out at broader scales, and the potential of this focus to attract new engagement with and support (financial and otherwise) for the arts.

    Join us for a webinar with Margy Waller, Senior Fellow with Topos Partnership and Clay Lord, VP of Local Arts Advancement with Americans for the Arts, as we explore the findings of this report. 

    Take a look at the findings ahead of this webinar here: https://www.americansforthearts.org/by-program/reports-and-data/legislation-policy/naappd/promoting-appreciation-for-the-role-of-the-arts-in-health-and-wellness-in-the-twin-cities

    Margy Waller

    Senior Fellow, Topos Partnership

    Margy Waller is an advocate for building community through the arts. She is a Senior Fellow at Topos Partnership (a national strategic communications organization), founder and Serendipity Director of Art on the Streets, and was a leader in the transformation of ArtsWave, an arts advocacy and support non-profit. She is an advisor to national organizations like Americans for the Arts, PolicyLink, and LISC, currently serving as field coordinator for four leading creative placemaking organizations, ArtPlace, Kresge Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and Arizona State University. Previously she was Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, with a joint appointment in the Economic Studies and Metropolitan Policy programs.

    Prior to Brookings, she was Senior Advisor on domestic policy in the Clinton White House. Before joining the Administration, Margy was Senior Fellow for Social Policy and Director of the Working Families Project at the Progressive Policy Institute. She also served as Director of Public Policy at United Way of America, and Director of Policy Development at Public/Private Ventures in Philadelphia, and a congressional fellow in the office of U.S. Representative Eric Fingerhut (D-OH). Margy holds a Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies from Northwestern University and a J.D. from The Ohio State University. She comments on arts, place, and community at @margyartgrrl and her ArtsJournal blog, The Bright Ride.

    Twitter: @margyartgrrl

    Websites 

    www.topospartnership.com       

    https://www.artsjournal.com/brightride/

    Clay Lord

    Vice President of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Clayton Lord is the vice president of local arts advancement for Americans for the Arts, where he oversees advocacy, capacity development and cohort building for local arts administrators and advocates in 5,000 communities across the United States. Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, Lord served for five years as the director of communications and audience development for Theatre Bay Area. At Americans for the Arts, the local arts advancement department aims to empower, educate, and support local arts leaders, public artists and arts administrators, emerging, mid-career, and executive leaders throughout the arts sector, arts marketers, and artist-activists as they work to be constantly relevant and transformative in the lives of American citizens and communities.

    Lord shepherds the New Community Visions Initiative, a multi-year effort to better understand and support the changing role of the arts and local arts agencies in American communities, and Americans for the Arts’ ongoing initiatives around cultural equity, diversity, and inclusion. He is the chief architect of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and the Executive Leadership Forum at Sundance.

    Lord is a prolific writer, thinker, and speaker about the public value of the arts, and has written for ArtsLink, ARTSblog, Theatre Bay Area magazine, Stage DirectionsInDanceThe VoiceArtsJournal, ArtsMarketing.org and others. He has edited and contributed to three books: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of the ArtsArts & America: Arts, Culture and the Future of America’s Communities; and To Change the Face & Heart of America: Selected Writings on the Arts and Communities, 1949-1992 and is working on the forthcoming New Community Visions: A Blueprint for 21st Century Arts-Based Community Development, due out in 2017. He holds a B.A. in English and Psychology from Georgetown University, and lives with his husband and daughter in Maryland.                

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Supporting Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for May 2019 will be about supporting artists as entrepreneurs.

    What skills do artists need to thrive as entrepreneurs?

    Join James Hart, Director of Arts Entrepreneurship and Professor of Practice with Southern Methodist University, Meadows School of the Arts as we discuss what Arts Entrepreneurship is, why students and early career artists need to think about their profession in this way, and how to support artists on their journey of becoming an Arts Entrepreneur. Be sure to bring your questions!



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Ask an Expert: Mural Policy & Management

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/19/2019

    In this first of two Ask an Expert virtual conversations, attendees will have the opportunity to connect with experts in the field of mural policy development and management. Participants will gain insight into mural implementation, learn about available resources and more!

    image About this Conversation

    Murals can be a source of pride for communities and come with their own opportunities and challenges for public art program administrators. Mural policy development and management guidelines can be tools for administrators, artists and community members to utilize when implementing a mural. In this first of two Ask an Expert virtual conversations, attendees will have the opportunity to connect with experts in the field of mural policy development and management. Participants will gain insight into mural implementation, learn about available resources and more!

    Learning Objectives:

    • Hear from experts in the development and management of mural policies
    • Learn about resources available for the development and implementation of policies

    Tune into Part 2 of this series, Ask An Expert: Mural Implementation & Community Engagement, here: https://artsu.americansforthearts.org/products/ask-an-expert-mural-implementation-community-engagement

    Jane Golden

    Executive Director, Mural Arts Philadelphia

    Jane Golden has been the driving force of Mural Arts Philadelphia since 1984, overseeing its growth from a small city agency into the nation’s largest public art program. Under Golden’s direction, Mural Arts has created over 4,000 works of public art through innovative collaborations. In partnership with a range of city agencies, she has developed groundbreaking and rigorous programs that work through art to make strides in youth education, restorative justice, and behavioral health. Sought after nationally and internationally as an expert on urban transformation through art, Golden has received numerous awards for her work, including the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Award and Philadelphia Magazine’s Trailblazer Award. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and serves on the Mayor’s Cultural Advisory Council, the Penn Museum Advisory Committee, and the board of directors of The Heliotrope Foundation.

    Website: muralarts.org

    Twitter: @JaneSGolden  

    Karl LeClair

    Public Art Program Manager, Boise City Department of Arts & History

    Karl LeClair develops, manages, and promotes public art projects and cultural policies for the City of Boise’s Percent-for-Art Fund and Public Art Program. In collaboration with the Arts & History Commission, City departments, community organizations and citizens, he explores meaningful ways of incorporating artist driven projects into various aspects of the urban landscape. In addition to being an energetic and trusted team player in the Department of Arts & History, LeClair maintains an active artist studio practice rooted in printmaking but explores drawing and installation. LeClair’s work has been exhibited at the Boise Art Museum, Bend Art Center, and Ming Studios. He has a BFA in Art Education, Printmaking, and Art History from Boise State University.

    Website: https://www.boiseartsandhistory.org/  

    Twitter: @BoiArtAndHist  

  • Community Engagement: Ensuring the Future of the Arts

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/18/2019

    Audience engagement is NOT community engagement! Do we have your attention? Join us for a webinar on at 3:00PM EDT on April 18 with DougBorwick, CEO of ArtsEngaged, as we look at the differences between audience and community engagement and hear why Community engagement is a critical tool for achieving viability.

    image About this Webinar

    Nonprofit arts organizations are facing an existential crisis stemming from skyrocketing expenses, rapidly changing demographics, and vastly altered social expectations. Community engagement is a critical tool for achieving, at a minimum, viability. This webinar will address the following content:

    • Definitions: The conflation of audience development, audience engagement, and community engagement continues to be a significant roadblock to growth. They are all valuable but they are all substantially different from each other. It’s vital to understand how each can build an arts organization.
    • Effective Engagement: Once you understand what community engagement is, it is necessary to adhere to basic principles of relationship building to maximize the work’s benefit both to the arts organization and the community.
    • Engagement and Marketing: Community engagement should not be an add-on, optional afterthought for arts organizations. Instead, it provides insights that can (and, arguably, must) make the work of virtually all management functions significantly more productive. We will focus here–briefly given the time constraints–on marketing.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will:

    • Be able to articulate the differences among audience development, audience engagement, and community engagement.
    • Be able to apply principles of effective community engagement to evaluate community engagement projects
    • Be able to use understanding of the principles of effective community engagement to evaluate how community-focused (and therefore effective) arts marketing materials are.



    Doug Borwick

    CEO, ArtsEngaged

    Doug Borwick is author of Engaging Matters, a blog for ArtsJournal, author/editor of Building Communities, Not Audiences: The Future of the Arts in the U.S. and author of Engage Now! A Guide to Making the Arts Indispensable. One of the country's leading advocates for the arts and community engagement Dr. Borwick has served as keynote speaker and workshop presenter at conferences across the U.S. and Canada as well as in Australia, Beijing, and Singapore. Notably, he has been featured speaker for statewide arts gatherings in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin as well as for the Canadian Arts Summit in Banff, Alberta. Barry Hessenius, author of Barry’s Blog and former Director of the California Arts Council and former President of the California Assembly of Local Arts Agencies, has described him as “the spokesperson for the importance and value of community engagement. [He] provides tools and thinking to improve your organization's operations in this area.”

    Dr. Borwick is past President of the Board of the Association of Arts Administration Educators, an international organization of higher education programs in the field. For three decades he served as Director of the Arts Management and Not-for-Profit Management Programs at Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Dr. Borwick is CEO of Outfitters4, Inc., providing management services for nonprofits and of ArtsEngaged, offering training and consultation services to artists and arts organizations seeking to more effectively engage with their communities. Dr. Borwick holds the Ph.D. in Music Composition from the Eastman School of Music and is an award-winning member of ASCAP. 

    Twitter: @arts_engaged and @DougBorwick  

    Website: www.artsengaged.com and www. artsjournal.com/engage

  • Reviewing the State of Equitable Investment Policies and Practices in the Local Arts Field

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/10/2019

    In this webinar, learn about both reports, including walking through the working group’s goals and recommendations for field action, discussing the findings from the Local Arts Agency Profile’s 2018 Equitable Investment Module, and talking about future work Americans for the Arts and others are investing in to begin turning research and discussion into action.

    image About this Webinar

    Each year the United States’ 4,500 local arts agencies (LAAs) collectively invest an estimated $2.8 billion in their local arts and culture ecosystems. This includes an estimated $600 million in direct investment in artists and arts and culture organizations through grants, contracts, and loans. This makes LAAs, collectively, the largest distributor of publicly-derived funds to arts and culture and one of the largest and steadiest underwriters of artists and creative workers in the United States. It is therefore crucial that LAAs employ a strong lens of equity to consider the full scope of their investments. 

    In February, Americans for the Arts released two reports—one a summary of working group findings and one a research report—revolving around how local arts agencies can center cultural equity in their investment strategies (grantmaking, people, space, staff, time). In this webinar, learn about both reports, including walking through the working group’s goals and recommendations for field action, discussing the findings from the Local Arts Agency Profile’s 2018 Equitable Investment Module, and talking about future work Americans for the Arts and others are investing in to begin turning research and discussion into action. If you would like to review the reports in advance, you can find both at the Americans for the Arts Cultural Equity research hub: https://www.americansforthearts.org/about-americans-for-the-arts/cultural-equity/research-reports.

    Participants will:

    • Hear an overview of results from the 2018 Local Arts Agency Profile: Equitable Investment Policies and Practices in the Local Arts Field module
    • Learn about local arts agency field trends for funding and resources
    • Learn about fair and equitable funding and resource distribution 

    Clay Lord

    Vice President of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Clayton Lord is the vice president of local arts advancement for Americans for the Arts, where he oversees advocacy, capacity development and cohort building for local arts administrators and advocates in 5,000 communities across the United States. Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, Lord served for five years as the director of communications and audience development for Theatre Bay Area. At Americans for the Arts, the local arts advancement department aims to empower, educate, and support local arts leaders, public artists and arts administrators, emerging, mid-career, and executive leaders throughout the arts sector, arts marketers, and artist-activists as they work to be constantly relevant and transformative in the lives of American citizens and communities.

    Lord shepherds the New Community Visions Initiative, a multi-year effort to better understand and support the changing role of the arts and local arts agencies in American communities, and Americans for the Arts’ ongoing initiatives around cultural equity, diversity, and inclusion. He is the chief architect of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and the Executive Leadership Forum at Sundance.

    Lord is a prolific writer, thinker, and speaker about the public value of the arts, and has written for ArtsLink, ARTSblog, Theatre Bay Area magazine, Stage DirectionsInDanceThe VoiceArtsJournal, ArtsMarketing.org and others. He has edited and contributed to three books: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of the ArtsArts & America: Arts, Culture and the Future of America’s Communities; and To Change the Face & Heart of America: Selected Writings on the Arts and Communities, 1949-1992 and is working on the forthcoming New Community Visions: A Blueprint for 21st Century Arts-Based Community Development, due out in 2017. He holds a B.A. in English and Psychology from Georgetown University, and lives with his husband and daughter in Maryland.                

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Legal Support for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/29/2019

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Legal Support for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.


    Why exactly do artists need lawyers and legal support? 


    Join Adam Holofcener Esq., Executive Director of Maryland Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, for a discussion on how artists operate as a business and the types of situations they can find themselves in that have legal implications (both good and not so good).  Issues that artists generally encounter first involve copyright, contracts, and business entities. Artists do not need to become lawyers to practice their art in a fiscally/legally sustainable way, but they do need to know enough to know when to ask for help, as well as what resources are available that may be able to provide affordable help. 



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Earth Day 2019: Restored Spaces

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    How do the arts and environment combine forces to make better communities? Join us this Earth Day (4/22) for a webinar presented by Shari Hersh with Mural Arts Philadelphia, looking at their Restored Spaces Initiative, which uses socially engaged public art as a platform for community-led neighborhood change.

    image About this Webinar

    April 22, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Mural Arts Philadelphia’s Restored Spaces Initiative uses socially engaged public art as a platform for community-led neighborhood change. Project sites become a community space and a strategic hub for cooperative thinking, spatial inventiveness, and environmental restoration. Restored Spaces Initiative employs a social justice approach to project design and implementation, centering participants as the experts on the needs of their community and the articulators of project goals and priorities.

    Trash Academy is a “collaboratory” between community members, artists, environmental activists, city leaders and high school students from all across the city that inspires a wellspring of actions around trash issues, and tests and shares the best grassroots solutions that emerge. A special chemistry occurs at the intersection of these diverse partnerships, one that allows for the creation of projects that pointedly address a social issue as experienced by people who are often the most impacted by its challenges.

    Join Restored Spaces Initiative Founder, Shari Hersh, as she shares the environmental justice tenants that inform the initiative’s projects and programs and will lead participants through the strategies developed in the initiative and tactical approaches through a case study on Trash Academy. 

    Participants Will: 

    • Understand the key tenants of environmental justice 
    • Explore how a public art program and project can create strategies and tactics that support environmental justice

    Shari Hersch

    Senior Project Manager/Founder, Restored Spaces

    Shari Hersh is a community artist and organizer. As Senior Project Manager and Founder of the Restored Spaces Initiative at the Mural Arts Program, Hersh researches and develops innovative projects in the public sphere. In partnership with artists, activists, youth and communities, Hersh facilitates a collaborative model of practice that emphasizes art and creativity as essential vehicles for catalyzing dialogue, building relationships and making decisions collectively. Her projects convene communities in collaboration with artists to create palpable positive impacts in neighborhoods and to affirm citizen rights to shape and use the city’s public spaces. Her work addresses the question, ‘How can we reknit social fabric through reshaping our communities, our environment and ourselves?’ Her recent efforts focus on socially engaged projects with youth, community and interdisciplinary collaborations that address issues such as housing, sustainability and access, and right to green spaces. 

    Twitter: @muralarts

    Website: https://www.muralarts.org/

  • Taking on Google Analytics

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    Are Google Analytics something that have been on your radar? With tools that allow you to measure things such as your advertising ROI, track your Flash, video, and social networking sites and applications, Google Analytics gives you the tools you need to better understand your customers. To help you make better sense of Google Analytics, Americans for the Arts has worked with arts marketing experts to design a 3-part series for beginners and experts alike. Join us for one or all of this 3-part series to gain a better understand of what exactly Google Analytics is and how to make better use of its functions.

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    About this Series

    Are Google Analytics something that have been on your radar? With tools that allow you to measure things such as your advertising ROI, track your Flash, video, and social networking sites and applications, Google Analytics gives you the tools you need to better understand your customers. To help you make better sense of Google Analytics, Americans for the Arts has worked with arts marketing experts to design a 3-part series for beginners and experts alike. Join us for one or all of this 3-part series to gain a better understanding of what exactly Google Analytics is and how to make better use of its functions.


    Lesson 1: Getting Started

    Lesson 2: What Am I Looking At?

    Lesson 3: Using Your Data to Make Decisions




    This series is funded by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

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  • Google Analytics Session 3: Using Your Data to Make Decisions

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/26/2019

    Before looking at any data, it is important to have your Google Analytics account set up properly. Ceci Dadisman, Digital Marketing Manager at FORM, will be joined by special guest Drew McManus to get you started off on the right foot. You’ll learn all of the little details that will enable you to get the most out of Google Analytics.

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     About this Lesson

    Ok, so you know how to read your Google Analytics data, but what should you do with it? We’ll delve into how you can use your data to make smarter decisions and turn your website into your most powerful marketing tool. 

    Learning Objectives

    1. Tracking digital campaigns
    2. Optimizing landing pages
    3. Creating a data-driven culture


    This lesson is funded by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

    Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Logo

    Ceci Dadisman

    Digital Marketing Manager, FORM

    Ceci is a multi-faceted marketing professional with more than 10 years of experience successfully marketing the arts and nonprofits utilizing innovative and cutting-edge initiatives. Currently the Digital Marketing Manager at FORM, she is nationally recognized as a leader in digital and social media marketing and specializes in the integration of digital marketing and technology into traditional marketing methods. 

    A frequent public speaker, Ceci’s recent and upcoming engagements feature national conference appearances at NTEN, National Arts Marketing Project, Arts Midwest, OPERA America, American Alliance of Museums, Museums and the Web, and Chorus America in addition to many other local and regional events. Known for her easy-going and vernacular style, she creates open learning environments with an emphasis on information sharing and useful takeaways. 

    Ceci is passionate about empowering people through marketing and is a contributor at ArtsHacker.com where she regularly shares timely information and step-by-step tutorials. She is also an adjunct lecturer at West Virginia University’s College of Creative Arts. 

    She is on the Arts Midwest Conference Professional Development Committee, the NTEN Conference Session Advisory Committee, is the Immediate Past President and Chapter Founder of Femfessionals West Palm Beach, the Immediate Past Chapter Leader and Chapter Founder of the West Palm Beach Chapter of Girl Develop It, the Immediate Past President of the South Florida Chapter of the American Marketing Association, and served for many years on the National Arts Marketing Project Advisory Committee and as the OPERA America Marketing Network Chair.  She also serves on the West Virginia University College of Creative Arts Visiting Committee. 

    Ceci was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated from West Virginia University with a music degree in vocal performance.  She currently lives in Cleveland, Ohio.

    WEBSITE: https://theformgroup.com/

    TWITTER: @CeciDadisman

    EMAIL: ceci@theformgroup.com

  • Arts + Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship Virtual Information Session

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Americans for the Arts is launching the Arts & Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship in Chicago, Cleveland, and Indianapolis for emerging mid-career arts, culture, and heritage leaders of color. A part of a broader Great Lakes arts leadership initiative in partnership with the Joyce Foundation and American Express, this information session will provide interested 2019 fellowship candidates with a program overview, application instructions, tips for applying, and a live Q & A period.

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    Americans for the Arts is launching the Arts & Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship in Chicago, Cleveland, and Indianapolis for emerging mid-career arts, culture, and heritage leaders of color. A part of a broader Great Lakes arts leadership initiative in partnership with the Joyce Foundation and American Express, this information session will provide interested 2019 fellowship candidates with a program overview, application instructions, tips for applying, and a live Q & A period.

    Learning Objectives:

    Participants will walk away with…

    A) an understanding of the fellowship program components and expectations 

    B) relevant tips on how to submit a strong application.

    Arts & Culture Leaders of Color Fellowship Website

    Emma Osore

    Program Manager, Equity in Arts Leadership, Americans for the Arts

    Emma Osore is a social architect who builds programs and ecosystems that arc towards justice. She is currently the first Equity in Arts Leadership Program Manager overseeing a new leadership development portfolio focusing on the future arts management workforce.

    Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, she worked in Los Angeles at the City of Beverly Hills where she worked on projects ranging from strategic planning to public art. Before receiving her Master’s degree she worked as chief-of-staff, community partnerships and philanthropy manager, and founded a student-run community garden at a reconstituted public high school in Washington, DC. Emma got her start working with youth in the juvenile justice system and in the DC Public Schools central office supporting the hiring and evaluation of school leaders. She is currently the co-founder of BlackSpace, a Black urbanist collective, and a mixed media artist.

    Emma holds a Bachelor’s in Urban and Regional Studies from Cornell University and a Master’s of Public Administration from Baruch College where she was a National Urban Fellow.

    Emma finds joy in meandering city walks and creates collages and watercolors along the way.


    Twitter Handle: @EmmaOsore