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  • Exploring Inclusive Creative Economy Definitions & Concepts Part 2

    Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 04/20/2021 at 2:30 PM (EDT)

    This session is the second of a two-part webinar to explore foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about economy systems. This program will primarily focus on the term “Solidarity Economy,” and its linkages to other movements towards a more just and inclusive economy, such as “New Economy,” “Just Transition,” “Restorative Economics,” and “Regenerative Economy.” We’ll discuss why these terms and systems are relevant to local arts leaders, offer examples of how they come to life in the work of developing inclusive creative economies, and provide space for discussion and questions.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    April 20 at 2:30 PM ET

    This session is the second of a two-part webinar to explore foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about economy systems. This program will primarily focus on the term “Solidarity Economy,” and its linkages to other movements towards a more just and inclusive economy, such as “New Economy,” “Just Transition,” “Restorative Economics,” and “Regenerative Economy.” We’ll discuss why these terms and systems are relevant to local arts leaders, offer examples of how they come to life in the work of developing inclusive creative economies, and provide space for discussion and questions.

    In this session, attendees will:

    • Explore concepts and terms related to an inclusive creative economy and what those terms mean in different contexts.
    • Hear some examples of projects that have brought the terms to life.
    • Discuss ideas for incorporating or building on the terms in their own communities, and what barriers might exist. 

    ABOUT THIS TWO-PART WEBINAR

    Understanding and creating shared language is critical if we are to do our work thoughtfully and with intention. Talking about the “creative economy” can mean many things to people. As Americans for the Arts launches a multi-year effort to support the continued development of local creative economies, we begin with the basics of exploring the language we use and how it can translate across communities. These two-part webinars will delve into foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about individuals, institutions, and economic systems. These programs will focus on a few terms, offer examples of how they can be applied, how other organizations and practitioners may use different language in different contexts, and provide space for discussion and questions. In this two-part webinar, practitioners will gain knowledge of equity-based terms and concepts for the purpose of working as informed community partners in the development of their local inclusive creative economy. 

    Register for Part 1 Here

  • National Arts Action Summit 2021

    Contains 14 Product(s)

    Designed to bring advocates the latest updates in federal arts policy, compelling up-to-the-minute data, and successful advocacy techniques, the National Arts Action Summit is the best way to prepare yourself to make key asks of your federal elected officials and to learn how to be the best arts advocate you can be.

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    BEFORE YOU REGISTER: 

    You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event. Please see the below “How To Register” section for more details on registering.


    REGISTRATION RATES 

    National Arts Action Summit Full Package

        $150

    National Arts Action Summit - Single Session Registration (Option Available March 2021)

        $25

    National Arts Action Summit Full Package - Practicing Artist Registration* (See Below for Eligibility Details/Instructions)

        $100

    National Arts Action Summit Full Package - Student Registration* (See Below for Eligibility Details/Instructions)

        $100

    Practicing Artists & Students:

    We are pleased to offer a discount to both practicing artists in any artistic discipline and enrolled students. To access the discount code granting $50 off the National Arts Action Summit package, those who qualify need to submit a request to events@artsusa.org.


    Full Registration Support:

    Due to these extraordinary times, we recognize that there are those who would not be able to join us if not for the opportunity of full registration support. We are pleased to provide such an opportunity to those wanting to attend this year’s Summit. Please click here to submit a request for full registration support. 


    HOW TO REGISTER: 

    To register for the full on-demand event, please click the red REGISTER button on the upper right-hand side of this page and then press COMPLETE REGISTRATION NOW. From there, you will be directed to your cart. You must have an account with Americans for the Arts to register. If you have an account, click the LOG IN button, enter your username and password, and continue to check out. If you do not have an account, click the CREATE AN ACCOUNT button. You will then be directed to the Americans for the Arts website to create your account. Once you have created your account, you must return to your cart on ArtsU to complete your registration for the event.  

    By registering for this package, you agree to all of the Policies & Procedures and Code of Conduct for the 2021 National Arts Action Summit. 


    HOW TO ACCESS Live & ON-DEMAND CONTENT: 
    • Visit the event agenda page to select your desired session for viewing.  
    • Select your desired session from the agenda list and click the red VIEW SESSION button. 
    • Once on the desired session page, locate the box on the right-hand side with the title of the session. Click on the box. 
    • Click the red ENTER LIVE EVENT IN PROGRESS or VIEW ARCHIVED RECORDING button - The session will automatically start playing in a new browser window. 

    Should you need any assistance accessing the live event or session recordings, please refer to our visual instructions on our "ArtsU Tech Support Page", or send us an email at events@artsusa.org.


  • Exploring Local and State Creative Workforce Recovery Programs

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/31/2021 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    As communities begin the process of recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic fallout, the creative economies in those communities must be part of the plan—both because there can be no recovery without a strong creative engine, and because millions of creative workers are out of work and ready to do their part. In this webinar, learn about creative workforce initiatives from across the country, including doing deep-dives into two city-based initiatives in Seattle and Sacramento. Dig into the “how” of funding, structure, timing, and more, and come away with good ideas about how you can encourage your own city or state to utilize relief and recovery funding to put creative workers to work as part of the national, state, and local recovery process.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    March 31 at 3:00 PM ET

    As communities begin the process of recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic and associated economic fallout, the creative economies in those communities must be part of the plan—both because there can be no recovery without a strong creative engine, and because millions of creative workers are out of work and ready to do their part. In this webinar, learn about creative workforce initiatives from across the country, including doing deep-dives into two city-based initiatives in Seattle and Sacramento. Dig into the “how” of funding, structure, timing, and more, and come away with good ideas about how you can encourage your own city or state to utilize relief and recovery funding to put creative workers to work as part of the national, state, and local recovery process.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn about creative workforce initiatives of various types, sizes, and funding models from across the country.
    • Hear first-hand accounts of two initiatives—one that has been completed and one that is just getting started—to understand the nuances of advocacy, partnership, program implementation, and leadership that go into them. 
    • Get a brief update on likely timelines for federal funds that might flow to states or localities for these types of programs.

    Calandra Childers

    Acting Director

    Seattle Office of Arts & Culture

    Calandra Childers is the Acting Director of the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, where she oversees the Office’s cultural investments in artists, cultural organizations and the Seattle community through public art commissions, grantmaking, and partnerships with a focus on community development and the equitable allocation of resources. Most recently she oversaw the launch of ARTS at King Street Station, a new 8,000-square-foot free cultural hub, programmed by and for the community.
    Calandra has two decades of public engagement, communications, and policy experience working with non-profit and government agencies including the cities of Seattle and Renton, Seattle Art Museum, and the Renton Chamber of Commerce. A graduate of Whitman College, she volunteers with the King-Snohomish County
    YWCA and the Rainier Valley Food Bank and enjoys outdoor adventures with her husband and dogs.

    Marie Acosta

    Executive and Artistic Director

    Latino Center of Art and Culture

    Marie Acosta has worked as an actor, writer, director, producer and project manager in the arts in a variety of capacities for over 30 years. 

    Since 2008 Ms. Acosta has led Sacramento’s Latino Center of Art and Culture as the Artistic/Executive Director. She conceptualized, curated and managed new programs including a two-day, outdoor celebration of Día de los Muertos, and a week-long theater production, La Pastorela de Sacramento which she also co-authored.

    Ms. Acosta has authored art catalog content, program notes and educational materials for the arts. In 2017, her short story “Raya Sol del Mundo” was included in The Race, Tales of Flight in the anthology by New Mexico artist, Patrick Allen Nagatani. 

    Ms. Acosta is a registered member of the Southern California Tongva (San Gabrieleño) tribe of Indians recognized by the State of California and is fluent in written and spoken Spanish/English. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from California State University, Northridge.

    Clayton W. Lord

    Vice President of Strategic Impact

    Americans for the Arts

    Clayton Lord is Americans for the Arts’ Vice President of Strategic Impact. In that role, he and the Strategic Impact team collaborate closely with research, communications, and program staff to connect the dots between the various components of work done at Americans for the Arts and encourage the creation of solid, complex initiatives that progress the core mission and goals of the organization and drive systemic change. Prior to shifting into this role, Lord was the Vice President of Local Arts Advancement for the organization for seven years. Lord is a prolific writer, thinker, and speaker about the public value of the arts and has edited and contributed to three books: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of the ArtsArts & America: Arts, Culture and the Future of America’s Communities; and To Change the Face & Heart of America: Selected Writings on the Arts and Communities, 1949-1992. He led Americans for the Arts’ New Community Visions Initiative, a multi-year effort to better understand and support the changing role of the arts and LAAs in American communities, and now oversees initiatives focused on the social impact of the arts, the equitable treatment of creative workers, and the proliferation of pro-arts policy. This has included the Arts + Social Impact Explorer (AmericansForTheArts.org/SocialImpact). He is the chief architect of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention. He holds a B.A. in English and Psychology from Georgetown University, and lives with his husband and daughter in Maryland.

  • 2021 Member Briefings

    Contains 4 Product(s)

    Member Briefings are our monthly opportunity to talk to you about what’s happening now! These calls will take place once a quarter, so mark your calendars to stay up-to-date on what’s happening at Americans for the Arts and across the sector. These calls are for you, so let us know if there’s a topic you’d like to know more about by contacting membership at membership@artsusa.org.

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    2021 Member Briefings

    Member Briefings are our opportunity to talk to you about what’s happening now! These calls will take place once a quarter, so mark your calendars to stay up-to-date on what’s happening at Americans for the Arts and across the sector. These calls are for you, so let us know if there’s a topic you’d like to know more about by contacting membership at membership@artsusa.org.

    Topics will be announced approximately two weeks prior to the scheduled briefing.

    We firmly believe that our #AFTAmember network is one of our strongest resources, so after our update, we’ll open the floor up to your questions, comments, recommendations, and lessons learned – we hope you’ll take advantage of each other’s expertise!

    March 2021

    Topic: Details coming soon!

    Date: March 30, 2021

    May 2021

    Topic: Details coming soon!

    Date: May 25, 2021

    September 2021

    Topic: Reopening in the Arts during COVID-19

    Date: September 21, 2021

    December 2021

    Topic: 2021 Looking Back and Looking Forward

    Date: December 14, 2021

  • 10 Reasons to Support the Arts in 2021

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/24/2021 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    With the arts advocacy season fully upon us, join Randy Cohen, our VP of Research, to discuss the latest updates to the top “10 Reasons to Support the Arts” and get 10 case-making arrows to include in your arts advocacy quiver to convince anyone to support the arts.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    March 24, 2021 @ 3:00 PM ET

    With the arts advocacy season fully upon us, join Randy Cohen, our VP of Research, to discuss the latest updates to the top “10 Reasons to Support the Arts” and get 10 case-making arrows to include in your arts advocacy quiver to convince anyone to support the arts.

    10 Reasons to Support the Arts

    Randy Cohen

    Vice President of Research

    Americans for the Arts

    Randy Cohen is Vice President of Research at Americans for the Arts—the national advocacy organization for the arts—where he has been empowering arts advocates since 1991. Randy stands out as a noted expert in the field of arts funding, research, and using the arts to address community development issues. He publishes Americans Speak Out About the Arts, the nation’s largest public opinion study about the arts, and produces the two premier economic studies of the arts—Arts & Economic Prosperity, the national economic impact study of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences; and Creative Industries, a mapping study of the nation’s 675,000 arts businesses and their employees. His 10 Reasons to Support the Arts blog received the Gold Award from the Association of Media & Publishing—their top honor for best blog post of the year. Randy led the development of The National Arts Index, the annual measure of the health and vitality of arts in the U.S. and the National Arts Policy Roundtable, an annual convening of leaders who focus on the advancement of American culture—launched in partnership with Robert Redford and the Sundance Institute. In the late 1990’s, Randy collaborated with the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities to create Coming Up Taller, the White House report on arts programs for youth-at-risk; and the U.S. Department of Justice to produce the YouthARTS Project, the first national study to statistically document the impact of arts programs on at-risk youth. A sought-after speaker, Randy has given speeches in all 50 states, and regularly appears in the news media—including the Wall Street JournalThe New York Times, and on C-SPAN, CNN, CNBC, and NPR.
     
    Randy has been a policy specialist for the National Endowment for the Arts, founded the San Diego Theatre for Young Audiences, and worked in medical research for Stanford University and Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. His board work includes the League of Historic American Theaters. Randy is a past Chairman of the Takoma Park Arts & Humanities Commission, during which time the Commission completed a cultural plan, established the city’s Poet Laureate and public art programs, and led the development of a million-dollar conversion of the city council chambers into a performing arts space.

    Twitter: @artsinfoguy

  • Arts Marketing Coffee Chat Series

    Contains 6 Product(s)

    Grapeseed Media and the National Arts Marketing Project, a program of Americans for the Arts, are excited to bring you a FREE, bi-monthly series of informal discussions about arts marketing. These monthly "Coffee Chats" for Marketing Directors are your opportunity to hear from arts and culture leaders who are marketing the arts in transformative and extraordinary ways to help better inform your practice.

    *Please note: Registration for this series has reached capacity. For questions, please contact ArtsU at artsu@artsusa.org.*

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    About the Arts Marketing Coffee Chat Series

    Grapeseed Media and the National Arts Marketing Project, a program of Americans for the Arts, are excited to bring you a FREE, bi-monthly series of informal discussions about arts marketing. These bi-monthly "Coffee Chats" for Marketing Directors are your opportunity to hear from arts and culture leaders who are marketing the arts in transformative and extraordinary ways to help better inform your practice.


    Please note, this series is best suited for:

    • Marketing Directors
    • Chief Marketing Officers
    • Vice Presidents of Marketing



    Coffee Chat Schedule

    2021 Arts Marketing Trends to Watch

    January 26, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST


    Reevaluating & Redefining Success

    March 23, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST


    Embedding Equity in Your Marketing Strategy

    May 25, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST


    Maintaining & Cultivating New Audiences

    July 27, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST


    Research & Data: What Do You Need?

    September 28, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST


    Save the Date - will confirm topic at a later date

    November 23, 2021 at 3:00 PM EST

    Thank you to Grapeseed Media for their support of this series.

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  • Exploring Inclusive Creative Economy Definitions & Concepts Part 1

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/19/2021 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    This session is the first of a two-part webinar to explore foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about individuals. This program will focus terms such as “arts worker,” “creative workers,” and “artist,” and explore how using different language in different contexts and communities evokes different responses. The session will offer examples of how they come to life in the real world, and provide space for discussion and questions.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    March 19 at 2:00 PM ET

    This session is the first of a two-part webinar to explore foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about individuals. This program will focus terms such as “arts worker,” “creative workers,” and “artist,” and explore how using different language in different contexts and communities evokes different responses. The session will offer examples of how they come to life in the real world, and provide space for discussion and questions.

    In this session, attendees will:

    • Explore concepts and terms related to an inclusive creative economy and what those terms mean in different contexts.
    • Hear some examples of projects that have brought the terms to life. Discuss ideas for incorporating or building on the terms in their own communities, and what barriers might exist. 

    ABOUT THIS TWO-PART WEBINAR

    Understanding and creating shared language is critical if we are to do our work thoughtfully and with intention. Talking about the “creative economy” can mean many things to people. As Americans for the Arts launches a multi-year effort to support the continued development of local creative economies, we begin with the basics of exploring the language we use and how it can translate across communities. These two-part webinars will delve into foundational concepts and definitions related to what an ‘inclusive creative economy’ means when it comes to talking about individuals, institutions, and economic systems. These programs will focus on a few terms, offer examples of how they can be applied, how other organizations and practitioners may use different language in different contexts, and provide space for discussion and questions. In this two-part webinar, practitioners will gain knowledge of equity-based terms and concepts for the purpose of working as informed community partners in the development of their local inclusive creative economy. 

    Register for Part 2 Here

    abdiel j. lopez

    Program Officer

    Center for Cultural Innovation

    abdiel j. lópez (they/them) is the program officer at the Center for Cultural Innovation (CCI), a California-based knowledge and financial services incubator for individual artists. As program officer, they manage the AmbitioUS portfolio, which invests in alternative economic paradigms of and federated infrastructure by those most dispossessed—primarily BIPOC communities—who are seeking financial self-determination in order to preserve and support their cultural identity and artistic expressions on their own terms. They also help facilitate the CAL-Now Network and administer the CALI Accelerator Grant program. abdiel joined CCI in 2019 as the program assistant and later became the program associate.

    Previously, abdiel was a gallery manager at Galería Estéreo in Mexico City. abdiel jump-started a career in the arts and culture sector after co-curating En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art at the Grinnell College Museum of Art and subsequently joining 18th Street Arts Center as the 2018 Getty Marrow Undergraduate Curatorial Programs Intern. Outside of CCI, abdiel works as a research assistant for a book project on the political activism of the adolescent and young adult children of immigrants. abdiel earned a B.A. in sociology and studied art history at Grinnell College. Born and raised in Los Angeles, abdiel currently lives in Koreatown with their Pomeranian dog Horchata.

    Website: https://www.cciarts.org/

  • Identifying Artist Representation in a Public Art Collection

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/02/2021

    One reason public art matters is that it can create a sense of belonging by being reflective of all those who make up a community. Who creates the artworks can be one way to ensure a civic collection is reflective of the community in which it lives. Identifying the demographic makeup of the artists in the collection is the first step to understanding how reflective a public art collection is of the community it serves.

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    About this Webinar

    One reason public art matters is that it can create a sense of belonging by being reflective of all those who make up a community. Who creates the artworks can be one way to ensure a civic collection is reflective of the community in which it lives. Identifying the demographic makeup of the artists in the collection is the first step to understanding how reflective a public art collection is of the community it serves.
     
    In 2020, the City of Houston Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs (MOCA) created a demographic review of Houston's 677-piece public art collection in a concerted effort to work toward and promote the City’s vision and goals stated in its Arts and Cultural Plan —to “foster an environment in which art and culture flourish for the sharing and benefit of all residents and visitors.” As Houston is the single most ethnically diverse major metropolitan area in the country, MOCA assessed the Civic Art collection to determine how closely Houston’s art collection represents the diverse populace of the city. The review presented statistics on the genders, races, and ethnicities represented by the 677 artworks in the Civic Art Collection, with a particular focus on female artists of color. Additionally, the review estimated the City’s financial investment in acquisition costs for new artworks over the lifetime of its collecting activity. This webinar will explore the in’s and out’s of how Houston reviewed their collection and dive into some of their lessons learned during this program.

    During this webinar, participants will:

    • Learn about the importance of a demographic review of a public art collection and how it can help address a city’s DEI obligations
    • Hear from experienced arts administrators on how they developed the review process and what it means for their public art program 
    • Learn the basics of implementing a demographic review of a public art collection

    Monique Mogilka

    Community Liaison

    Houston Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs

    My name is Monique Mogilka, and I'm from Edmond, Oklahoma. I have a BA in sociology and a BA/MA in art history. I am particularly interested in the intersections between sociology and art, and my thesis focused on Minimalism and the emergence of artist foundations. I have experience in public service as well as writing about and supporting visual art. I have interned at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art in Norman, OK and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. In 2019, I was a statistical research specialist at the OK State Bureau of Investigation, where I analyzed crime report data. In my position at the Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs in Houston, I use my experience with public service, curating, and data analysis to serve the needs of our creative community and civic art collection.

    Theresa Escobedo

    Civic Art Program Manager

    Houston Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs

    Theresa Escobedo is an arts administrator, curator, and multi-disciplinary artist working in Houston, Texas. She manages Civic Art Program for the City of Houston through the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs and is a current Artist in Residence at the Zocalo Artist Residency. 

    In her previous work, she has curated exhibitions and coordinated and executed public programs and projects designed to create community experiences and to give artists the opportunity to impact neighborhoods through creative place-making and social inquiry. Theresa studied at the University of Houston and received a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design with focus on urban planning and generative design processes. 

    Instagram: @houstonmoca

    Twitter: @houston_moca

    Website: https://www.facebook.com/Houst... ;http://www.houstontx.gov/cultu...

  • Investing in Local Partnerships to Address Community Goals

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/25/2021

    Partnerships can make or break the effectiveness of a community development project. Local arts agencies are uniquely positioned to be a conduit role of the arts in helping address community goals. In this webinar, hear from Cara Goger, Executive Director of the Mariposa County Arts Council on how over the past several years she has built successful partnerships with the local municipal planning agency, an environmental conservancy group and the indigenous community native to Mariposa County. Explore how to cultivate partnerships that lead to the inclusion of arts and culture within land management strategies that may utilize traditional practices.

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    About this Webinar
    February 25th at 3:00 PM ET

    Partnerships can make or break the effectiveness of a community development project. Local arts agencies are uniquely positioned to be a conduit role of the arts in helping address community goals. In this webinar, hear from Cara Goger, Executive Director of the Mariposa County Arts Council on how over the past several years she has built successful partnerships with the local municipal planning agency, an environmental conservancy group and the indigenous community native to Mariposa County. Explore how to cultivate partnerships that lead to the inclusion of arts and culture within land management strategies that may utilize traditional practices.

    In this session, attendees will:

    • Learn about how a local arts agency built relationships and how those partnerships are being sustained for long-term community goals.
    • Hear from a local arts agency as they integrate the arts into a land management planning process.

    Cara Goger

    Executive Director

    Mariposa County Arts Council

    Cara Goger joined theMariposa County Arts Council, Inc. in 2012 as Executive Director and overseesthe entire organization and its staff.  Ms. Goger holds a graduate degreein Political Science/International Relations and, before taking the helm at theMariposa County Arts Council, worked for eight years with the AjA Projectproviding photography-based educational programming to youth affected by warand displacement and the Museum of Photographic Arts serving as the primaryartist-in-residency for the Museum’s lifespan programming (55+) and leadinstructor for the School in the Park’s 5th grade program. Ms. Gogerbrings several years of experience at engaging a variety of audiences with thecareful study and exploration of art, with particular attention to projectsthat facilitate community engagement and creative placemaking.

    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/caragoger7...
    Website: http://www.mariposaartscouncil...                        

    Mikey Goralnik

    Community Design and Development Planner

    Mariposa County Planning Department

    Mikey Goralnik, AICP, PLA isthe Community Design and Development Planner at the Mariposa (CA) CountyPlanning Department. In this role, he manages interdisciplinary communityplanning and design initiatives, including creative placemaking programs andprojects that blend environmental education, ecological design, and publichealth. He has a BA in American Studies from Tufts University, a MA in City andRegional Planning from UNC-Chapel Hill, and a MA in Landscape Architecture fromNorth Carolina State University.

    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mi...

    Website: https://www.mariposacounty.org...                          

    Clay River

    Managing Director

    American Indian Council of Mariposa County (Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation) and Miwumati Healing Center

    Clay Muwin River is the Managing Director for the Southern Sierra Miwuk’s non-profit; American Indian Council of Mariposa County and Miwumati Healing Center. River has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Native Youth Education and a Master of Arts degree in Indigenous Education & Curriculum from Goddard College in Vermont. River has a wide-ranging background on issues that directly impact Native Americans and works directly with tribal governments, tribal consortia, federal agencies and national and regional organizations impacting Indian country. River’s experience areas include cultural arts revitalization, Native education, curriculum, program development and implementation, social services, native wellness and community health, environmental protection and restoration, management and leadership, grant writing and positions held on cultural arts steering committees and boards.

    River has served Native communities for most of their life, providing traditional education, cultural training and intergenerational guidance to build resiliency. Clay has traveled, lived and worked in many Native communities across Turtle Island and honors the knowledge learned from hundreds of traditional teachers and elders. Whether they are providing youth leadership training, assisting Elders healing from historical trauma or helping to bring indigenous wellness back to remote native communities, Clay shares their passion for being positive and proactive. River is a cultural arts activist, mural painter, weaver, beader, quilter, land restorer, water protector and a member of the Passamaquoddy and Mi’kmaq Tribes.

    Website: https://www.southernsierramiwu...                                                                  

  • 2021 Jorge and Darlene Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design Information Session

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/03/2021

    The 2021 Jorge and Darlene Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design will recognize an arts administrator with a track record of exemplary work in producing with intention to advance community, civic, or social good by implementing art-based processes and/or projects that lead to positive change in the built environment of a local community. Attend this webinar to learn about the Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design and get answers to questions about the application process.

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    About this Information Session 
    February 3 at 3:00 PM ET


    The 2021 Jorge and Darlene Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design will recognize an arts administrator with a track record of exemplary work in producing with intention to advance community, civic, or social good by implementing art-based processes and/or projects that lead to positive change in the built environment of a local community. Attend this webinar to learn about the Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design and get answers to questions about the application process. 

    Attendees to this information session will learn:

    • The history and goals of the Pérez Prize in Public Art & Civic Design 
    • Gain a better understanding of the application process

    Patricia Walsh

    Public Art & Civic Design Senior Program Manager

    Americans for the Arts

    As the Public Art & Civic Design Senior Program Manager,Patricia Walsh overseas five program areas under the Equity + Local ArtsEngagement department including Arts and Community Development; Arts in CivicDesign; Creative Placemaking; Cultural Districts, Trails and Tourism; andPublic Art. Through her work she engages with and works to educate local artsagency leaders on how to utilize the arts to equitably address community needsand goals. Her work aims to support professional development, resource buildingand networking opportunities for arts administrators to utilize the arts tocreate accessible public spaces, enable inclusive and equitable communitydevelopment, and ensure the arts are an active component in equitable economicgrowth and sustainability.

    Patricia is a member of the Arts and Planning Interest GroupSteering Committee for American Planning Association, co-chair for theWashington District Council on Placemaking for Urban Land Institute, and anartist selection committee member for two projects with the City of Rockville,Maryland.

    She holds a Master of Science in Arts Administration from BostonUniversity, a Bachelor of Arts in painting from State University of New York atPlattsburgh, and an Associates in Applied Science in Commercial Art fromDutchess Community College.