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  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/23/2022

    In this workshop, teaching artists Raz Salvarita (Philippines) and Francine Kliemann (Brazil) share their respective creative practices and projects as well as their evaluation efforts and learning using the Continuum of IMPACT. Raz’s project, Unmasking Climate Injustices: Voices from the Past, Present, and Emerging Generations, aims to magnify citizens’ and students’ roles individually and collectively as activators, facilitators, and educators toward shifting community consciousness about climate change. Francine’s project, The School of the (Im)Possible, engaged eight- to 10-year-olds to give voice to the meaningful perspectives and expectations that youth bring regarding the future and issues of climate change. This workshop delves into the nitty gritty of how the Continuum was adopted and applied in each project to help specify desired outcomes and indicators and formulate a logic model and evaluation plan. Raz and Francine will share what data they collected, how they approached data analysis, and what outcomes they were able to gauge. As teaching artists who are receiving continued support through the ITAC IMPACT: Climate initiative, they will talk about what that extended support is enabling toward policy and systems change. ITAC’s Aislinn Ryan provides a preview of a 20-hour online curriculum that ITAC will offer for teaching artists and their allies to develop their own climate change projects, including a look at the evaluation curriculum.

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    About this Webinar


    Part 2 Deep Dive: Teaching Artists Unpack Using the Continuum to Understand Impact

    September 21, 12:00 noon - 1:15 ET 

     

    In this workshop, teaching artists Raz Salvarita (Philippines) and Francine Kliemann (Brazil) share their respective creative practices and projects as well as their evaluation efforts and learning using the Continuum of IMPACT.  Raz’s project, Unmasking Climate Injustices: Voices from the Past, Present, and Emerging Generations, aims to magnify citizens’ and students’ roles individually and collectively as activators, facilitators, and educators toward shifting community consciousness about climate change. Francine’s project, The School of the (Im)Possible, engaged eight- to 10-year-olds to give voice to the meaningful perspectives and expectations that youth bring regarding the future and issues of climate change. This workshop delves into the nitty gritty of how the Continuum was adopted and applied in each project to help specify desired outcomes and indicators and formulate a logic model and evaluation plan.  Raz and Francine will share what data they collected, how they approached data analysis, and what outcomes they were able to gauge. As teaching artists who are receiving continued support through the ITAC IMPACT: Climate initiative, they will talk about what that extended support is enabling toward policy and systems change.  ITAC’s Aislinn Ryan provides a preview of a 20-hour online curriculum that ITAC will offer for teaching artists and their allies to develop their own climate change projects, including a look at the evaluation curriculum.


    Learning Objectives:

    • Gain practical evaluation know-how through these artists’ adoption and practical application of the Continuum of IMPACT.
    • Learn how the Continuum can help understand multiple layers of impact from individual to the collective. 
    • Consider program design measures such as duration and multi-year funding to ensure sustainability of efforts that can further structural and systemic changes.  
    • Consider how sharpened attention to civic or social outcomes may influence aesthetic choices and/or creative practice.


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    Students and community members engage with public artwork installation from Raz Salvarita’s Unmasking Climate Injustices project. Photo: Courtesy of Raz Salvarita

    Francine Kliemann

    teaching artist

    Platô Cultural

    Francine Kliemann is an interdisciplinary artist and theatre maker. She holds a BA in Theatre at UFRGS (BR, 2011) and a MA in Performance Making at Goldsmiths University of London(2017). She is the founder and artistic director of Platô Cultural, a company that creates immersive experiences in Education. Her work explores new ways of learning and connecting to the world through imagination and play. Platô Cultural combines design, immersive art and new technologies to create playful experiences that nurture the individual and the collective learning, looking for new relationships between people and places. Francine founded Plato Cultural in 2018 with support from Goldsmiths University of London. Since 2020, Platô Cultural has been based in Florianópolis, Brazil. Platô’s current project is “School of the Impossible” is an immersive education experience for 8 to 10 year old. The pilot project of School of the (Im)Possible was commissioned by the International Teaching Artists Collaborative (ITAC) as part of the ITAC IMPACT: Climate in 2021 in a a co-creation process between my company Platô Cultural, Santa Terezinha School(São José, Brazil), the Environmental School (São José, Brazil), and the Secretariat of Education of São José. (Brazil). They are now partnering with The Necessary Space (Scotland) and the International Teaching Artist Collaborative (ITAC) to deliver this project to more schools in Brazil and Scotland in 2022, funded by the British Council International Collaboration Grant.


    Website: https://www.platocultural.com/

    Márcia Donadel

    artist-researcher educator

    Platô Cultural

    Márcia Donadel is an artist-researcher andeducator. She coordinates the pedagogical approaches, and assessment of Platô’sprojects. She holds a PhD (2019) and a MA (2012) in Performing Arts at UFRGS(Brazil). She was awarded with the CAPES-PDSE (2018) research grant for adoctoral internship at C-DaRE, Coventry University, UK. Her practice and herresearch focus on embodied methodologies and creative practices in education.

    Website: www.platocultural.com     

    Raz Salvarita

    teaching artist

    Razcel Jan Salvarita hails from the Philippines and works internationally at the intersection of arts, culture, and environmental conservation. He is a cross-disciplinary creative artist, a socially engaged community arts organizer, and staunch advocate for sustainable development. He identifies his role as an “activator, facilitator, and educator” and serves as an independent cultural bearer. Raz is a recipient of numerous international fellowship grants including: ITAC Impact: Climate and Future Arts Leaders of the Australia Council for the Arts, among others. He is a TEDx speaker on “Effecting Environmental Consciousness through Arts.” He is the founder of Baryo Balangaw Creative Initiatives: Bridging Creativity in Rural Communities in the Philippines. Raz believes in the transformative power of the arts as a centering place for healing, recovery, and renewal of courage. 


    Website: www.razsalvarita.com

    Aislinn Ryan

    Project Manager, ITAC Impact: Climate

    International Teaching Artist

    Aislinn Ryan is Project Manager for ITAC’s pioneering initiative, ITAC IMPACT: Climate.  Working alongside a climate expert, a curriculum designer, and partner networks, Aislinn coordinates the activities of the Climate Collective: an international cohort of teaching artists commissioned to design and deliver community-engagement projects that combat climate change. Prior to joining ITAC, Aislinn worked in the Tours and Projects department at Askonas Holt, managing international tours for major orchestras and dance companies. She has worked for English Touring Opera, where she managed relationships with trusts and foundations, brokered creative partnerships, and expanded the membership scheme. Aislinn also previously served on the Board of OYAP (Oxfordshire Youth Arts Partnership).  Aislinn is a former professional dancer; she toured the world as the principal dancer of Riverdance and is a qualified Irish dance teacher. She has a BA (Hons) in English Literature and History from Victoria University in her hometown of Wellington, New Zealand.

    Website: https://www.itac-collaborative.com/

  • Contains 2 Product(s)

    Through its groundbreaking ITAC IMPACT: Climate initiative, the International Teaching Artist Collaborative (ITAC) is supporting teaching artists around the world to engage students and their local communities around pressing issues of climate change. Teaching artists from Brazil to Alaska to the Philippines and beyond are designing and leading innovative projects in schools and communities to raise awareness, educate, change minds and behavior, and to activate participation around a local climate challenge. Having impact around this pressing issue is imperative and evaluation is an integral part of the work for both ITAC and the teaching artists. To help, ITAC has embedded Animating Democracy’s Continuum of IMPACT as a central tool for sharpening desired outcomes and indicators of change and guiding artists’ evaluation planning, implementation, reporting, and communication.

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    About this Series

    Free 2-part series!

    Continuum of IMPACT in Action!

    Teaching Artists Addressing Climate Change around the World

     

    Through its groundbreaking ITAC IMPACT: Climate initiative, the International Teaching Artist Collaborative (ITAC) is supporting teaching artists around the world to engage students and their local communities around pressing issues of climate change. Teaching artists from Brazil to Alaska to the Philippines and beyond are designing and leading innovative projects in schools and communities to raise awareness, educate, change minds and behavior, and to activate participation around a local climate challenge. Having impact around this pressing issue is imperative and evaluation is an integral part of the work for both ITAC and the teaching artists. To help, ITAC has embedded Animating Democracy’s Continuum of IMPACT as a central tool for sharpening desired outcomes and indicators of change and guiding artists’ evaluation planning, implementation, reporting, and communication.  


    Part 1 – Big Picture: Evaluating Initiative- & Ground-Level Impact of ITAC IMPACT 

    September 14, 12:00 noon - 1:15 ET 

    ITAC’s Aislinn Ryan provides a big picture overview of the impetus and design of the IMPACT: Climate initiative, its goals, the range of projects supported, and how the Continuum of IMPACT has facilitated a consistent and doable approach to evaluating outcomes of teaching artists’ projects and the initiative on the whole. Teaching artist Katie Basile shares her project in Alaska for an on-the-ground look at her teaching artistry strategies and experience using the Continuum in project development and evaluation.  Click here for detail and to register for this free ArtsU webinar.

     

    Part 2 – Deep Dive: Teaching Artists Unpack Using the Continuum to Understand Impact

    September 21, 12:00 noon - 1:30 ET 

    In this workshop, teaching artists Raz Salvarita (Philippines) and Francine Kliemann (Brazil) share their respective creative practices and projects and take a deep dive to share their evaluation efforts and learning using the Continuum of IMPACT.  Having completed their pilot projects, they’ll talk about how ITAC’s extended support is enabling continuing efforts toward policy and systems change. Participants will learn about a new online curriculum developed to help teaching artists and those who support and partner with them to develop their own climate change projects and evaluations of impact.  Click here for detail and to register for this free ArtsU webinar.

     

    We recommend that registrants explore the Continuum of IMPACT prior to the webinars to gain familiarity, as only a brief introduction will be provided in Part 1.  

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  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/16/2022

    The International Teaching Artist Collaborative (ITAC) is forging important pathways for teaching artists, schools, community leaders, and funders who share concerns about climate crises as they escalate locally and globally. In this session, learn from ITAC’s Aislinn Ryan about its groundbreaking initiative, ITAC IMPACT: Climate, which provides a framework through which teaching artists can design and lead projects in their local communities to positively impact climate issues using teaching artistry. Gain an overview of the impetus for this initiative, its intents, program design, funding, and multi-year evolution. Most specifically, participants will gain insight into how Animating Democracy’s Continuum of IMPACT is being applied as an integral tool for evaluating the range of teaching artist-led projects and the initiative on the whole and, of course, what has been learned about impacts. Teaching artist Katie Basile will discuss her in-progress project using photography and drones with students in Napakiak, AK, concerning permafrost melt, flooding, and rapid erosion and her experience using the Continuum.

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    About this Webinar

    Part 1 Big Picture: Evaluating Initiative & Ground Level Impact of ITAC IMPACT

    September 14, 12:00 noon - 1:15 ET 

     

    The International Teaching Artist Collaborative (ITAC) is forging important pathways for teaching artists, schools, community leaders, and funders who share concerns about climate crises as they escalate locally and globally. In this session, learn from ITAC’s Aislinn Ryan about its groundbreaking initiative, ITAC IMPACT: Climate, which provides a framework through which teaching artists can design and lead projects in their local communities to positively impact climate issues using teaching artistry. Gain an overview of the impetus for this initiative, its intents, program design, funding, and multi-year evolution. Most specifically, participants will gain insight into how Animating Democracy’s Continuum of IMPACT is being applied as an integral tool for evaluating the range of teaching artist-led projects and the initiative on the whole and, of course, what has been learned about impacts. Teaching artist Katie Basile will discuss her in-progress project using photography and drones with students in Napakiak, AK, concerning permafrost melt, flooding, and rapid erosion and her experience using the Continuum.  


    Learning Objectives:

    • Learn ways to apply the Continuum of IMPACT to define and evaluate initiative level and project level outcomes and indicators for creative issue-based projects, as artists, partners, and funders.  
    • Learn how this initiative is building teaching artists’ capacity in evaluation through cohort orientation and exchange, connection with local climate experts, an online curriculum, and the ITAC Climate Collective.
    • Gain deeper understanding of the role teaching artists and their partners can play to engage students and community members regarding local climate change concerns.

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    Students in Napakiak, AK using drones to capture shoreline erosion as part of Katie Basile’s teaching artist residency project with ITAC’s IMPACT: Climate initiative. Photo: Courtesy Katie Basile  

    Aislinn Ryan

    Project Manager, ITAC Impact: Climate

    International Teaching Artist

    Aislinn Ryan is Project Manager for ITAC’s pioneering initiative, ITAC IMPACT: Climate.  Working alongside a climate expert, a curriculum designer, and partner networks, Aislinn coordinates the activities of the Climate Collective: an international cohort of teaching artists commissioned to design and deliver community-engagement projects that combat climate change. Prior to joining ITAC, Aislinn worked in the Tours and Projects department at Askonas Holt, managing international tours for major orchestras and dance companies. She has worked for English Touring Opera, where she managed relationships with trusts and foundations, brokered creative partnerships, and expanded the membership scheme. Aislinn also previously served on the Board of OYAP (Oxfordshire Youth Arts Partnership).  Aislinn is a former professional dancer; she toured the world as the principal dancer of Riverdance and is a qualified Irish dance teacher. She has a BA (Hons) in English Literature and History from Victoria University in her hometown of Wellington, New Zealand.

    Website: https://www.itac-collaborative.com/

    Katie Basile

    teaching artist

    Katie Basile is a photojournalist, documentary photographer, and filmmaker with a focus on her home, the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region of Alaska. Katie began her career as a teaching artist and has more than a decade of experience collaborating on multimedia stories with rural Alaskan youth. From Yup’ik kayak building to the high teacher turnover rate, youth-led storytelling continues to expand Katie’s understanding of traditional and contemporary rural Alaska. Katie is a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Awardee and the co-recipient of a National Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in video through her work at KYUK Public Media. She recently directed the award-winning short film “To Keep as One” in collaboration with the Newtok Village Council which premiered at the 2020 Big Sky Film Festival. Katie lives in Bethel, Alaska with her husband and two young sons.

    Website: http://www.katiebasile.com/

  • Contains 3 Product(s)

    Member Briefings are our opportunity to talk to you about what’s happening now! These calls will take place once a quarter, so mark your calendars to stay up-to-date on what’s happening at Americans for the Arts and across the sector. These calls are for you, so let us know if there’s a topic you’d like to know more about by contacting membership at membership@artsusa.org.


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    2022 Member Briefings

    Member Briefings are our opportunity to talk to you about what’s happening now! These calls will take place once a quarter, so mark your calendars to stay up-to-date on what’s happening at Americans for the Arts and across the sector. These calls are for you, so let us know if there’s a topic you’d like to know more about by contacting membership at membership@artsusa.org.

    Topics will be announced approximately two weeks prior to the scheduled briefing.

    We firmly believe that our #AFTAmember network is one of our strongest resources, so after our update, we’ll open the floor up to your questions, comments, recommendations, and lessons learned – we hope you’ll take advantage of each other’s expertise!


    March 2022

    Topic: Six Principles for Transformational Change at Americans for the Arts with President and CEO Nolen Bivens

    Date: March 8, 2022

    August 2022

    Topic: SRP Updates & Member Spotlight

    Date: August 9, 2022

    October 2022

    Topic: TBD

    Date: October 11, 2022

    December 2022

    Topic: TBD

    Date: December 13, 2022

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/16/2022

    Moved by the cultural and social reckoning catalyzed by the events of 2020, scholar, educator, and writer Jan Cohen-Cruz and artist and cultural worker Rad Pereira embarked on a journey. Forty years apart in age, with different racial, gender, and national backgrounds, yet aligned in their commitment to a vibrant U.S. theater that responds to its time and place, they co-wrote, Meeting the Moment: Socially Engaged Performance 1965-2020 (released in June, New Village Press). Based on nearly 100 interviews and exchanges, they capture the contributions and experiences of a diverse range of socially engaged theater and performance makers who reflect and lift up the many voices that make up the U.S. today. Meeting the Moment provides a platform for a conversation that centers socially engaged artists—the unique roles they play, challenges they face in such intersectional work, and what they need to do that work effectively and in keeping with their values. This webinar will explore the themes that emerged through the authors' research,

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    About this Webinar

    June 16 @ 3:00 P.M. ET

    Moved by the cultural and social reckoning catalyzed by the events of 2020, scholar, educator, and writer Jan Cohen-Cruz and artist and cultural worker Rad Pereira embarked on a journey.  Forty years apart in age, with different racial, gender, and national backgrounds, yet aligned in their commitment to a vibrant U.S. theater that responds to its time and place, they co-wrote, Meeting the Moment: Socially Engaged Performance 1965-2020 (released in June, New Village Press).  Based on nearly 100 interviews and exchanges, they capture the contributions and experiences of a diverse range of socially engaged theater and performance makers who reflect and lift up the many voices that make up the U.S. today.

    Meeting the Moment provides a platform for a conversation that centers socially engaged artists—the unique roles they play, challenges they face in such intersectional work, and what they need to do that work effectively and in keeping with their values.

    This session explores themes that emerged through the authors’ interviews such as:   

    • their diverse influences and multiple approaches to education and training;
    • the role played by race, circumstances, class, gender/sexuality, and other identity grounders;
    • the rise in artists embedded in community development initiatives and collaborating with public agencies;
    • the supports that are needed by artists who are equally committed to art and social justice to sustain them in life and work; and
    • how 2020 has impacted socially engaged artists and may influence their directions moving forward. 

    This webinar sets the stage for a fall event series, Animating Democracy / Reflecting Forward. The series considers the practice and progress of community-based and socially/civically engaged art and culture over recent decades, and its promise now and into the future.  It will bring together trailblazing artists and cultural leaders from Animating Democracy’s founding years along with this generation’s leading-edge practitioners from arts and other sectors to reflect back on and imagine forward the role of arts and culture, artists and culture bearers in animating democracy. 

    This webinar is free as part of our support and service to the field. Please consider becoming a member or donating to Americans for the Arts to support ongoing access to resources like these for everyone. 

    Jan Cohen-Cruz is a scholar, educator, and writer who has made vast contributions to building and sharing knowledge of community-based and socially engaged theater and arts. She wrote Local Acts, Engaging Performance, and Remapping Performance; edited Radical Street Performance; coedited with Mady Schutzman, Playing Boal and A Boal Companion; and co-authored with Rad Pereira, Meeting the Moment: Socially Engaged Performance, 1965-2020, by Those Who Lived It, published by New Village Press. From 2013-2019, she worked with A Blade of Grass, supporting socially engaged artists, serving as director of field research and co-founding its magazine. From 2007-2012, she directed Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life, a consortium of colleges and universities committed to civic engagement, and co-founded its journal, Public. Cohen-Cruz earned her Ph.D. in Performance Studies at New York University and was a professor in the Drama Department, initiating its minor in Applied Theatre. In 2012, she received the Association for Theatre in Higher Education’s Award for Leadership in Community-Based Theatre and Civic Engagement. Jan was an evaluator for the U.S. State Department/Bronx Museum cultural diplomacy initiative smARTpower and for New York City’s Public Artists in Residence. She and Pam Korza researched and wrote the Municipal-Artist Partnership guide, a joint effort of A Blade of Grass and Animating Democracy/Americans for the Arts. Jan teaches at Touchstone Theatre/ Moravian University and, with her family, operates the Smokehouse Food Truck in eastern Pennsylvania. 

    Rad Pereira is a queer, mixed Black, Indigenous Brazilian Jewish (im)migrant cultural worker building consciousness between healing justice, system change, reindigenization, and queer futures currently based in Lenapehoking (Brooklyn). As a community artist, they created The (Im)Migrant Hustle and produced Bang Bang Gun Amok I + II at Abrons Art Center, Media Tools for Liberation with JackNY, and facilitated Decolonization Rave and Cosmic Commons with You Are Here. They are a 2017 New York City Public Artist in Residence with Department of Cultural Affairs and Children’s Services working with LGBQTIA foster youth. As an actor and director, Rad has contributed to stories at HBO, CBS, NBC, MTV, National Black Theatre, MITU350, The Public Theater, La Mama etc., Shakespeare Theatre in DC, Pittsburgh Public Theatre, New York Theatre Workshop, The Bushwick Starr, Target Margin, Poetic Theater, Ars Nova, New Ohio, Sesame Street, Theatre 167 and various online media platforms. Rad has spoken and consulted at the Queens Museum, Rio de Janeiro Museum, Instituto Republica, PSU Art + Social Practice, SITI Company Thought Center, United Nations, A Blade of Grass, Superblue, Broadway Advocacy Coalition, The 8th Floor, Working Woman of Color Conference, Dance/NYC Symposium, and Culture/Shift. 

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    photo description: A brown skinned, curly haired Rad and white skinned, salt and peppered haired Jan smile into the camera warmly. Behind them is a green pond and forest full of green trees and bushes.
  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/10/2022

    This session offers an overview of ways the Aesthetic Perspectives framework can be activated including defining outcomes and indicators of artistic success, guiding data collection, and communicating findings and lessons learned. While working as an evaluator and researcher at the Los Angeles County Dept. of Arts & Culture, Susannah Laramee Kidd used the framework in a formal evaluation of public art and community engagement at four county parks and libraries. Learn how the Aesthetic Perspectives framework revealed what aesthetic factors were essential in determining project success and influenced social outcomes.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    This session offers an overview of ways the Aesthetics framework can be activated in evaluation of civically and socially engaged arts and culture projects and programs as well as action-based research.  These include: developing a shared language among artists and stakeholders about the creative work; defining indicators of artistic success; guiding data collection; designing ethnographic and developmental evaluations; and communicating findings and lessons learned.

    While working as an evaluator and researcher at the Los Angeles County Dept. of Arts & Culture, Susannah Laramee Kidd, in collaboration with artist and community engagement coordinator Sara Daleiden, used the Aesthetic Perspectives framework in a formal evaluation of public art projects and community engagement at four county parks and libraries. 

    Participants will learn how the Aesthetics framework was used to:

    • analyze what aesthetic attributes of specific artworks and artistic processes contributed to success
    • inform data collection tools that documented community members’ experience with creative work
    • further stakeholders’ learning about public art impact and evaluation practices 

    Looking for more on Aesthetic Perspectives? This webinar builds on the content in the webinar, Assessing Arts for Change: Understanding Aesthetic Perspectives. We recommend viewing this before attending. This webinar is part of the Activating the Aesthetic Perspectives Framework: A Tool for Funders, Evaluators & Artists collection.

    This webinar is free as part of our support and service to the field, as is the Aesthetics Perspectives framework. Please consider becoming a member or donating to Americans for the Arts to support ongoing access to resources like these for everyone. 

    Susannah Laramee Kidd, Ph.D

    Susannah Laramee Kidd is an ethnographer turned evaluator and arts and culture policy researcher. She is passionate about developing learning processes that enable practitioners to meet their artistic and social change goals. To that end, she wrote a brief guide for evaluators and researchers on the “Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence for Arts for Change” framework published by Animating Democracy in 2017. As an independent consultant, Laramee Kidd works with artists, arts and community development organizations, and community advocates to create frameworks that generate knowledge for action from the ground up. Currently with Sara Daleiden, she has been part of a team at the City of Santa Monica, CA supporting the Art of Recovery initiative. In 2020 and 2021, many of the Art of Recovery projects activated commercial corridors and public spaces hit hard by the pandemic. With Metris Arts Consulting, she led knowledge-building, theory of change, evaluation-planning and capacity-building, and cultural asset mapping projects in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Chicago and for the state of Indiana. Previously, Laramee Kidd was a Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow at the LA County Department of Arts and Culture, where she collaborated with artist Sara Daleiden to evaluate public art, social practice, and public engagement projects at parks and libraries in unincorporated LA County neighborhoods. Laramee Kidd holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology of Religion and Literature and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from Emory University. 

    We encourage registrants to become familiar with the Aesthetic Perspectives framework before attending these webinars so that we may give good time for the specific focus of each webinar. Find the free online Full version or the Short Take and a webinar on the framework below. 

  • Contains 2 Product(s)

    Since its release in 2017, arts and cultural organizations, Local and State Arts agencies, funders, and evaluators have tapped the framework, Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change, to support their grantmaking and evaluation. Animating Democracy presents two webinars that shine light on how funders and evaluators and the artists they support have and can put this tool to work.

    About this Collection

    Since its release in 2017, arts and cultural organizations, Local and State Arts agencies, funders, and evaluators have tapped the framework, Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change, to support their grantmaking and evaluation.  Animating Democracy presents two webinars, one on Grantmaking and one on Evaluation, that shine light on how funders and evaluators and the artists they support have and can put this tool to work.

    Developed by artists with ally evaluators and funders to address aesthetic and cultural biases and Eurocentric standards of excellence, Aesthetic Perspectives offers 11 attributes and inquiry questions to guide the development, implementation, and evaluation of creative practices and products in arts and community development, civic engagement, civic and social change, and justice work.

    Join us to learn how you can apply the framework. Each session offers:

    • An overview of multiple ways the framework can be activated
    • A featured case presentation detailing how the framework has been applied 

    Click the CONTENT tab to learn more about these two webinars!

    Looking for more on Aesthetic Perspectives? This two-part collection builds on the content in the webinar, Assessing Arts for Change: Understanding Aesthetic Perspectives. We recommend viewing this before attending the sessions in this two-part collection.

    This two-part collection is free as part of our support and service to the field, as is the Aesthetics Perspectives framework. Please consider becoming a member or donating to Americans for the Arts to support ongoing access to resources like these for everyone. 

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  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/28/2022

    With the arts advocacy season fully upon us, join Randy Cohen, our VP of Research, to discuss the latest updates to the top “10 Reasons to Support the Arts” and get 10 case-making arrows to include in your arts advocacy quiver to convince anyone to support the arts.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    With the arts advocacy season fully upon us, join Randy Cohen, our VP of Research, to discuss the latest updates to the top “10 Reasons to Support the Arts” and get 10 case-making arrows to include in your arts advocacy quiver to convince anyone to support the arts.

    This webinar is free as part of our support and service to the field. Please consider becoming a member or donating to Americans for the Arts to support ongoing access to resources like these for everyone. 

    10 Reasons to Support the Arts

    Randy Cohen

    Vice President of Research

    Americans for the Arts

    Randy Cohen is Vice President of Research at Americans for the Arts—the national advocacy organization for the arts—where he has been empowering arts advocates since 1991. Randy stands out as a noted expert in the field of arts funding, research, and using the arts to address community development issues. He publishes Americans Speak Out About the Arts, the nation’s largest public opinion study about the arts, and produces the two premier economic studies of the arts—Arts & Economic Prosperity, the national economic impact study of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences; and Creative Industries, a mapping study of the nation’s 675,000 arts businesses and their employees. His 10 Reasons to Support the Arts blog received the Gold Award from the Association of Media & Publishing—their top honor for best blog post of the year. Randy led the development of The National Arts Index, the annual measure of the health and vitality of arts in the U.S. and the National Arts Policy Roundtable, an annual convening of leaders who focus on the advancement of American culture—launched in partnership with Robert Redford and the Sundance Institute. In the late 1990’s, Randy collaborated with the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities to create Coming Up Taller, the White House report on arts programs for youth-at-risk; and the U.S. Department of Justice to produce the YouthARTS Project, the first national study to statistically document the impact of arts programs on at-risk youth. A sought-after speaker, Randy has given speeches in all 50 states, and regularly appears in the news media—including the Wall Street JournalThe New York Times, and on C-SPAN, CNN, CNBC, and NPR.
     
    Randy has been a policy specialist for the National Endowment for the Arts, founded the San Diego Theatre for Young Audiences, and worked in medical research for Stanford University and Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. His board work includes the League of Historic American Theaters. Randy is a past Chairman of the Takoma Park Arts & Humanities Commission, during which time the Commission completed a cultural plan, established the city’s Poet Laureate and public art programs, and led the development of a million-dollar conversion of the city council chambers into a performing arts space.

    Twitter: @artsinfoguy

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/19/2022

    This session offers an overview of ways the Aesthetic Perspectives framework can be activated at many points in the cycle of grantmaking. Learn how Kentucky Foundation for Women integrated the framework into its Bridging Divides grant program supporting two-year projects aimed to effect positive social change for women and girls in Kentucky. Committed to collecting evidence of change and participatory evaluation, hear how KFW used the framework to guide grantee evaluation and mid-term and final reporting, as well as a grantee’s experience.

    imageAbout this Webinar

    This session offers an overview of ways the Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change framework can be activated in the cycle of grantmaking: from designing and refining programs, to framing criteria for aesthetic characteristics, to preparing and guiding grant panel processes toward fair and equitable review of artistic practice and aesthetic qualities in arts for change work.  In the featured presentation, the Kentucky Foundation for Women shares how it has integrated the framework into its Bridging Divides grant program which supports two-year projects aiming for positive social outcomes for women and girls in Kentucky.  In its commitment to deepen understanding of impact of its grant support, KFW used the framework to guide grantee evaluation and mid-term and final reporting and the foundation’s own learning. 

    During this webinar, we will...

    • Share KFW’s commitment to a participatory evaluation approach and co-learning with grantees;
    • Walk through KFW’s process and grantee reporting form which incorporates questions from the Aesthetics framework and experiments with a 4-point scale;
    • Demonstrate how KFW has helped grantees gauge social or civic outcomes using Animating Democracy’s Continuum of IMPACT as well as aesthetic qualities/attributes that support excellent artistic practice and outcomes;
    • Invite grantee reflections from Yes Arts on their experience of tapping the Aesthetics framework;
    • Share KFW’s use of the Artists Thrive rubric to support KFW’s Equity and Access goals 

    Looking for more on Aesthetic Perspectives? This webinar builds on the content in the webinar, Assessing Arts for Change: Understanding Aesthetic Perspectives. We recommend viewing this before attending. This webinar is part of the Activating the Aesthetic Perspectives Framework: A Tool for Funders, Evaluators & Artists collection.

    This webinar is free as part of our support and service to the field, as is the Aesthetics Perspectives framework. Please consider becoming a member or donating to Americans for the Arts to support ongoing access to resources like these for everyone. 

    Sharon LaRue

    Executive Director

    Kentucky Foundation for Women

    Sharon LaRue always knew she would be working to serve women and girls using art and creativity. As an Art Therapist, she developed a children’s coloring book to be used for child abuse prevention. As the director of a program working to eliminate interpersonal violence at the University of Louisville, she facilitated Arts as Activism projects utilizing the art making process to fuel creativity, generate dialogue between diverse populations, and foster social change. Since 2014, Sharon has served as the Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women an organization that honors the feminist perspective of collective strength and recognizes art as a powerful catalyst for transformational change through grant making and artist residencies. She places an intentional focus on “learning from the field” by participating in local, regional, and national dialogues on feminist art for social change to strengthen access to resources and celebrate the diversity and complexity of all of our lives. Sharon is honored to have received awards from The Center for Non-Profit Art of Inclusion, The Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs, the Rotary Service above Self Award, the Liberation Award to end Human Trafficking, and the UNA USA Human Rights Civil Rights Award. She serves as a Kentucky Colonel and on the Girls Scouts of Kentuckiana board of directors.

    Kentucky Foundation for Women

    Amelia Berry

    Grantwriter

    Yes Arts

    Amelia Berry served as Executive Director of Yes Arts from 2018 to June 2021 and was a driving force behind the creation of Just Say Yes, the county-wide youth substance use prevention program. She now serves as executive director of Just Say Yes at the Franklin County Health Department.  In 2019, Amelia was selected as one of forty leaders nationally to be part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health Leaders program. After beginning her career in social service work with immigrant and refugee women in the US, Amelia has held positions in non-profit management, legal services and consulting. Her clients have included the United Nations Secretariat Office for the Special Adviser on Gender Issues, the Consensus Building Institute, the China Law Society, and Yes Arts. Having previously lived in China, France, and Trinidad & Tobago, Amelia now makes her home in Frankfort, Kentucky, where she is a member of the Frankfort Independent Schools Board of Education. Amelia has played steel drum since adolescence, has played with the Trinidadian band Invaders during Trinidad Carnival’s “Panorama” celebration, and occasionally has the opportunity to teach the instrument to Frankfort youth. Amelia also enjoys creative writing and making things with her hands.

    Yes Arts Website

    Jackie Gordon Duvall

    Coordinator, Black Woman Artists of Frankfort

    Yes Arts

    Jackie Gordon Duvall works with Yes Arts to coordinate the Black Woman Artists of Frankfort network. In her full-time profession, she joined the Kentucky State Athletic Department staff as the Associate Director of Athletics and Senior Woman Administrator in January 2020. Duvall previously served as Director of Athletics, Equity, and Extended Learning for Frankfort Independent School District, where she returned to her Alma Mater to provide leadership over Middle and High School Sports and extracurricular activities.  Jackie served 3 years in Shelby County Public Schools as a Family Resource Center Director and prior to that, 10 years working in the Cabinet for Health and Human Services for Kentucky.  Duvall has achieved two master's degrees in Child and Family Studies and Organizational Leadership from Western Kentucky University.  She earned her bachelor's at the University of Kentucky in Communications and Informational Studies, Family Studies. Duvall has a passion for making positive changes in her community; she is a Board Member and Youth and Community Program Coordinator for the Family Circle Inc., a non-profit organization established in 2011.  She is also the founder and head coach of the Frankfort All-Star Track and Field Club, established in 2012.  Jackie and her husband, Nicholas Duvall, reside in Frankfort, Kentucky, and they have three children.

    Yes Arts Website

    We encourage registrants to become familiar with the Aesthetic Perspectives framework before attending these webinars so that we may give good time for the specific focus of each webinar. Find the free online Full version or the Short Take and a webinar on the framework below. 

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/07/2022

    ​Join your peers for a ​free​ virtual conversation where we will explore tactics for how local arts agencies can create effective and mutually beneficial partnerships with their local chambers of commerce.

    imageAbout this Conversation

    Join your peers for a free virtual conversation where we will explore how local arts leaders can expand their roles as arts leaders and increase their community impact by building relationships with their local economic developers and chambers. We'll hear examples from Mark Nerenhausen, President & CEO of Hennepin Theater Trust, as to how Hennepin has become a trusted and vital community and economic development partner, beyond being a leading arts organization in Minneapolis. This conversation will build upon the content in Part two of the How to Partner with your Local Chamber of Commerce collection. We recommend checking out the on-demand webinars and toolkit before joining us for this discussion.

    Mark Nerenhausen

    President/CEO

    Hennepin Theatre Trust

    Mark Nerenhausen is the President/CEO of Hennepin Theatre Trust. Prior to the Trust, he served as founding director and professor of practice of the Janklow Arts Leadership Program at Syracuse University. Before that, he served as president and CEO of the $354 million AT&T Performing Arts Center in Dallas, where he secured AT&T as a naming sponsor, raised more than $4 million in the first year of operations, created a governing board and instituted an integrated business information platform. He also brokered strategic partnerships with regional and national organizations, several of which were devoted to minority arts, and initiated the Jazz Roots series.

    From 1998 to 2009, Nerenhausen led the Performing Arts Center Authority in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., with responsibility for managing the multi-venue Broward Center for the Performing Arts and five other performing arts venues, fashioning it into a catalyst for tourism, economic development, education, industry innovations and cross-cultural exchange. Under Nerenhausen’s tenure, the Broward Center’s main concert hall consistently ranked in the world’s top 10 venues for ticket sales, according to Pollstar and Venues Today magazines.

    Nerenhausen has held other major positions at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center in Kahului, Hawaii (1993-98); the Oshkosh Grand Opera House in Wisconsin (1990-93); the Bijou Theater Center in Knoxville, Tenn. (1987-89); the Milwaukee Performing Arts Center in Wisconsin (1985-87); and the Tennessee Performing Arts Center in Nashville (1983-85).

    Jessica Stern (Moderator)

    Senior Manager, Local Arts and Business Partnerships

    Americans for the Arts

    Jessica is the Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager with Americans for the Arts. Prior to this position, she acted as the Membership and Resources Manager for the Nonprofit Association of Oregon (NAO), providing oversight of NAO’s statewide membership program while curating and reinventing its online platform of nonprofit management best practice resources. Prior to NAO, Jessica spent nearly five years working with Portland’s local business committee for the arts, Business for Culture & the Arts (BCA), delivering programs that engaged employees from BCA’s 200+ business members, managing all marketing and communications strategies, and retaining and cultivating corporate and community partnerships. Jessica has also served in development roles at Metropolitan Youth Symphony and Literary Arts; and has freelanced as an independent web designer and developer.