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  • Effective Civic Engagement for Arts Advocates

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    How can arts advocates be effectively engaged in our political discourse and in our upcoming elections? Learn some tips and best practices to being a great advocate while not running afoul of any rules. Americans for the Arts Senior Fellow, former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg will lead this discussion using data he gathered from interviewing arts advocates who are now elected officials.

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     About this Webinar

    How can arts advocates be effectively engaged in our political discourse and in our upcoming elections? Learn some tips and best practices to being a great advocate while not running afoul of any rules.  Americans for the Arts Senor Fellow, former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg will lead this discussion using findings he gathered from interviewing arts advocates who are now elected officials.   

    Moderated by Americans for the Arts Senior Director of State and Local Government Affairs Jay Dick

    Stan Rosenberg

    Former Massachusetts State Senator

    Former Massachusetts State Senator Stanley C. Rosenberg was proud to represent the Hampshire, Franklin & Worcester County district in the Massachusetts Senate from 1991 to 2018 and served as Senate President from 2015 to 2017. Throughout his career in public service, he has remained steadfastly committed to Massachusetts values – like supporting working families, investment in the arts and culture, protecting our environment, increasing government transparency, and ensuring all students have the opportunity to succeed.

    Stan believes that government works better when a diversity of viewpoints are heard. During his time as Senate President, he transformed the culture of the Senate by empowering and engaging his colleagues in a model he calls “Shared Leadership,” which encourages participation and cooperation. He has embraced technology and community outreach, creating a more accessible, modern and engaged Senate which reacts quickly to the needs of voters. Stan’s push to make government more responsive stretches back to 1993, when he co-authored the “Motor Voter” bill to modernize our voting system and boost voter turnout. He was later asked two times to redraw Massachusetts’ political boundaries during the redistricting process, earning high praise the second time for an exceptionally transparent process which created a new minority-majority district.

    Stan’s attention seldom strays far from fighting for working families and growing our economy from the bottom up. As Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways & Means, he passed a long-overdue wage hike for the Commonwealth’s lowest-paid human service workers. His tireless work to increase funding for education from early childhood to college has driven the creation of an innovation economy which keeps Massachusetts competitive.

    Twitter: @SenStan

    Jay Dick

    Senior Director of State and Local Government Affairs, Americans for the Arts

    Jay Dick is the Senior Director of State and Local Government Affairs at Americans for the Arts where he works to educate and inform elected officials about the value of the arts and culture.  As an twenty-year veteran of K Street, Capitol Hill, the private sector, and federal, state, and local campaigns, Jay possesses a tremendous body of knowledge in the field of arts policy, government, the legislative process, and grassroots advocacy.  He is a nationally recognized speaker on these topics having designed and overseen many initiatives.  Jay is regularly interviewed by the media and testifies in front of legislative bodies as an expert on these topics and on Americans for the Arts’ legislative positions.

    With the mandate to positively affect the policies that promote State and Local funding and expansion of the arts, Jay works closely with the Americans for the Arts’ fifty State Arts Advocacy Captains, Local Arts Groups, and the State Arts Action Network and Council to accomplish this goal.  Further, he oversees Americans for the Arts’ Public Partnerships and works closely with the members and staffs of the National Governors Association, National Lt. Governors Association, National Conference of State Legislators, National Association of Counties, The United State Conference of Mayors, and the National League of Cities. 

    Jay has worked at Americans for the Arts for ten years.  Prior, he worked for Capitol Advantage, a high-tech advocacy company; the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM); and the Society of Plastics Industry (SPI).  Jay spent the 1996 campaign cycle working as the Field Director for a congressional campaign in Iowa’s 3rd District and began his career with the United States Senate where he served on the personal staff of Tom Harkin (IA) and then Frank Lautenberg (NJ). 

    Jay was recently appointed by Virginia Governor McAuliffe to serve a five-year term as a Commissioner for the Virginia Commission for the Arts.  He also serves on the Board of the Arts Council of Fairfax County where he chairs their advocacy committee

  • May 2019 Emerging Leaders Network Call

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Join us each quarter for conference call with the Emerging Leaders Network of Americans for the Arts. Every call will feature an Emerging Leader in the Arts and Culture field, discuss trends in the sector, include open space for Emerging Leaders to share and receive feedback, have an Americans for the Arts update, and more. Emerging Leaders from across the arts and culture sector are encouraged to join. Calls are open and free to members of Americans for the Arts. All calls will be recorded and archived.

    image May 2019 

    Emerging Leaders Network Call

    May 16, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Join us each quarter for conference call with the Emerging Leaders Network of Americans for the Arts. Every call will feature an Emerging Leader in the Arts and Culture field, discuss trends in the sector, include open space for Emerging Leaders to share and receive feedback, have an Americans for the Arts update, and more. Emerging Leaders from across the arts and culture sector are encouraged to join. Calls are open and free to members of Americans for the Arts. All calls will be recorded and archived.

    May Emerging Leader Feature: Todd Trebour, Organizations Program Director, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts

    Theme: Creating Your Own Professional Development Opportunities

    Featured Web Tool: Arts & Economic Prosperity Calculator



    Would you like to be featured on one of our quarterly calls? Email Cristyn Johnson to find out more.

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    Todd Trebour

    Organizations Program Director, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts

    Todd Trebour is the Organizations Program Director at the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA). Todd manages and oversees the agency’s support for organizations, including grants, programs, and services. A strong believer the power of partnerships and networks, Todd has piloted several new initiatives in his first year at RISCA, including affinity group convenings of organizations; an Arts and Cultural Advocacy Workshop series with the United Way of Rhode Island, City of Providence Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, and Rhode Island Council for the Humanities; and an Advancing Cultural Equity Workshop and Technical Assistance Program in partnership with the Rhode Island Foundation. He has also seen a 47% increase in applications to the Arts Access project grant program thanks to intensive and continuous outreach to Rhode Island organizations. Todd received his BA in Music Performance from Whitman College, his MM in Voice from Rice University, and his Core Certificate in Arts Management from the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service. Currently, Todd is in his second term on the Emerging Leaders Advisory Council at Americans for the Arts.

    Twitter: @RISCA1967

    Website: http://www.arts.ri.gov/

    Cristyn Johnson

    Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Cristyn Johnson is the Local Arts Advancement Program Manager at Americans for the Arts. In this capacity, she develops Americans for the Arts’ comprehensive full-career-spectrum field education offerings to advance competent and informed local, regional and national arts professionals.  She also develops a suite of programs and resources centered around the full leadership pipeline and organizational needs of a diverse workforce. She manages, grows, and cultivates an Emerging Leaders Network, a Mid-Career Leaders Network, and an Executive Leaders Network by building a connected network of arts professionals in the field of practices, who can share their knowledge with the field at large.        

  • Speak with Impact: Public Speaking for Creative Professionals

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/15/2019

    Looking to improve your presentation and public speaking skills? Join us on May 15 for a webinar with Communication and Career Coach, Madeline Schwartz and learn to be clear, confident, and the expert in the room.

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     About this Webinar

    Key factors in effective presenting and public speaking include clarify, confidence, and being the expert in the room. Join us for a webinar with Communication and Career Coach, Madeline Schwarz as she takes a look at effective ways to overcome your nerves, structure a presentation, and captivate a room.

    Learning Objectives: 

    • Identify techniques to overcome nerves so you can engage your audience.
    • Utilize objectives to structure your presentation and stay on track, even when you're nervous.
    • Discover how to bring more energy to communication so you can clearly and confidently talk about your work and inspire action.

    Madeline Schwarz

    Communication Coach

    Madeline Schwarz helps creative professionals get their ideas seen, heard, and respected. She teaches people how to articulate their thoughts, communicate the value of their work, and share their ideas in ways that their teammates and clients understand. She brings an introvert’s perspective to public speaking and infuses her training with process and play. Madeline coaches professionals privately and in small, carefully curated groups designed to revolutionize what it feels like to communicate in high-pressure and professional settings. She teaches a small group class called Speak with Impact and facilitates workshops on public speaking and team communication for Fortune 500 companies and smaller organizations. She has spoken at branding agencies, nonprofits, financial service companies, colleges, and professional networking groups.

    When she’s not working, you can find her playing with Legos with her 5-year-old and community organizing around local school issues. 

    Website: madelineschwarzcoaching.com

    Want to know how to fit practice into your busy schedule? Read Practice Your Talk on the Subway and get 7 practice strategies to rock your presentation.

    4 Steps to Winning a Work Presentation: If you have 5 minutes to prepare for a presentation, don’t spend it reading your slides to yourself. Follow these 4 easy steps to get clear on your message and stay on point answering questions.

    Contact Madeline: madeline@madelineschwarz.com

    Website: madelineschwarzcoaching.com

  • Assessing Arts for Change: Understanding Aesthetic Perspectives

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/14/2019

    How do you assess Arts for Change? Arts for Change—creative work at the intersection of community/civic engagement, community development, and justice—often challenges the conventional terms by which the arts are described and assessed. Animating Democracy, a program of Americans for the Arts, worked with artists and their allies to develop a framework designed to enhance understanding and evaluation of Arts for Change.

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     About this Webinar

    How do you assess Arts for Change?  Arts for Change—creative work at the intersection of community/civic engagement, community development, and justice—often challenges the conventional terms by which the arts are described and assessed. Animating Democracy, a program of Americans for the Arts, worked with artists and their allies to develop a framework designed to enhance understanding and evaluation of Arts for Change.

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    Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change features 11 aesthetic attributes of excellence defined by artists that can be observed across a spectrum of community engaged arts and culture. The framework aims to: elevate aesthetics, address inequity resulting from historical domination of Euro-American aesthetic standards, expand criteria for assessing civically and socially engaged art, and promote deeper appreciation for the rigor required for such work.  It offers guidance for discussing artists’ approaches to work, the qualities of the work as experienced by audiences and participants, and the connections of art to context.   

    This webinar introduces the framework and offers an opportunity for exchange around the often elusive and challenging topic of artistic excellence. Participants will learn how artists and funders have already put Aesthetic Perspectives to use and imagine how it might help meet agency interests and the artist and communities they serve.  Check out the framework materials in advance, if you like, at: http://www.animatingdemocracy.org/aesthetic-perspectives.

    Barbara Schaffer Bacon

    Co-Director, Animating Democracy, Americans for the Arts

    Barbara Schaffer Bacon co-directs Animating Democracy, a program of Americans for the Arts that inspires, informs, promotes, and connects arts and culture as potent contributors to community, civic, and social change. Additionally, she contributes to Local Arts Advancement work at Americans for the Arts. Barbara has written, edited, and contributed to many publications including Trend or Tipping Point: Arts & Social Change Grantmaking; Civic Dialogue, Arts & Culture: Findings from Animating Democracy; Case Studies from Animating Democracy; Animating Democracy: The Artistic Imagination as a Force for Civic Dialogue; Fundamentals of Local Arts Management; and The Cultural Planning Work Kit.  A consultant in program design and evaluation, Barbara has served as an adviser for state and national arts agencies and private foundations. Barbara previously served as executive director of the Arts Extension Service at the University of Massachusetts. She is president of the Arts Extension Institute, Inc. and a board member for WomenArts. Barbara served for 14 years on the Belchertown, MA School Committee.  In 2018, Barbara received the Robert E. Gard Foundation Leadership Award. She currently serves as a member of the Massachusetts Cultural Council.      

    www.animatingdemocracy.org 

    Cristyn Johnson

    Local Arts Advancement Program Manager, Americans for the Arts

    Cristyn Johnson is the Local Arts Advancement Program Manager at Americans for the Arts. In this capacity, she develops Americans for the Arts’ comprehensive full-career-spectrum field education offerings to advance competent and informed local, regional and national arts professionals.  She also develops a suite of programs and resources centered around the full leadership pipeline and organizational needs of a diverse workforce. She manages, grows, and cultivates an Emerging Leaders Network, a Mid-Career Leaders Network, and an Executive Leaders Network by building a connected network of arts professionals in the field of practices, who can share their knowledge with the field at large.        

  • Promoting Appreciation for the Role of Arts in Health and Wellness

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    As arts advocates work to make the case for support of the arts, one of the best arguments is that of social impact. With benefits far beyond enrichment and enjoyment, one social impact area gaining attention is the intersection of arts and health. Americans for the Arts partnered with Topos and Metris Arts Consulting to launch a research project summarizing existing research and example projects in the arts and health realm. Join us on June 7 at 2pm EDT for a webinar with Margy Waller, Senior Fellow with Topos Partnership and Clay Lord, VP of Local Arts Advancement with Americans for the Arts, as we explore the findings of this report.

    image About this Webinar

    June 7, 2019 at 2:00PM EDT

    Arts advocates around the country work hard to make the case that creative venues, activities and professionals should receive strong support. One of the most important yet underutilized advocacy arguments is the social impact of the arts—the benefits that go beyond enjoyment and enrichment of individual participants. Among these social impacts are benefits to individual and community health, which are increasingly a focus of social science research and evaluation.

    In partnership with Topos and Metris Arts Consulting, Americans for the Arts launched a research project to produce a document summarizing existing research and example projects at the intersection of arts and health. This research report qualitatively explores Americans’ current thinking about the connection between arts and health, and their responses to communications about this topic. Conversations with a diverse cross-section of individuals in the Twin Cities give us important insights into how a conversation about the arts-health connection may play out at broader scales, and the potential of this focus to attract new engagement with and support (financial and otherwise) for the arts.

    Join us for a webinar with Margy Waller, Senior Fellow with Topos Partnership and Clay Lord, VP of Local Arts Advancement with Americans for the Arts, as we explore the findings of this report. 

    Take a look at the findings ahead of this webinar here: https://www.americansforthearts.org/by-program/reports-and-data/legislation-policy/naappd/promoting-appreciation-for-the-role-of-the-arts-in-health-and-wellness-in-the-twin-cities

    Margy Waller

    Senior Fellow, Topos Partnership

    Margy Waller is an advocate for building community through the arts. She is a Senior Fellow at Topos Partnership (a national strategic communications organization), founder and Serendipity Director of Art on the Streets, and was a leader in the transformation of ArtsWave, an arts advocacy and support non-profit. She is an advisor to national organizations like Americans for the Arts, PolicyLink, and LISC, currently serving as field coordinator for four leading creative placemaking organizations, ArtPlace, Kresge Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, and Arizona State University. Previously she was Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, with a joint appointment in the Economic Studies and Metropolitan Policy programs.

    Prior to Brookings, she was Senior Advisor on domestic policy in the Clinton White House. Before joining the Administration, Margy was Senior Fellow for Social Policy and Director of the Working Families Project at the Progressive Policy Institute. She also served as Director of Public Policy at United Way of America, and Director of Policy Development at Public/Private Ventures in Philadelphia, and a congressional fellow in the office of U.S. Representative Eric Fingerhut (D-OH). Margy holds a Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies from Northwestern University and a J.D. from The Ohio State University. She comments on arts, place, and community at @margyartgrrl and her ArtsJournal blog, The Bright Ride.

    Twitter: @margyartgrrl

    Websites 

    www.topospartnership.com       

    https://www.artsjournal.com/brightride/

    Clay Lord

    Vice President of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Clayton Lord is the vice president of local arts advancement for Americans for the Arts, where he oversees advocacy, capacity development and cohort building for local arts administrators and advocates in 5,000 communities across the United States. Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, Lord served for five years as the director of communications and audience development for Theatre Bay Area. At Americans for the Arts, the local arts advancement department aims to empower, educate, and support local arts leaders, public artists and arts administrators, emerging, mid-career, and executive leaders throughout the arts sector, arts marketers, and artist-activists as they work to be constantly relevant and transformative in the lives of American citizens and communities.

    Lord shepherds the New Community Visions Initiative, a multi-year effort to better understand and support the changing role of the arts and local arts agencies in American communities, and Americans for the Arts’ ongoing initiatives around cultural equity, diversity, and inclusion. He is the chief architect of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and the Executive Leadership Forum at Sundance.

    Lord is a prolific writer, thinker, and speaker about the public value of the arts, and has written for ArtsLink, ARTSblog, Theatre Bay Area magazine, Stage DirectionsInDanceThe VoiceArtsJournal, ArtsMarketing.org and others. He has edited and contributed to three books: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of the ArtsArts & America: Arts, Culture and the Future of America’s Communities; and To Change the Face & Heart of America: Selected Writings on the Arts and Communities, 1949-1992 and is working on the forthcoming New Community Visions: A Blueprint for 21st Century Arts-Based Community Development, due out in 2017. He holds a B.A. in English and Psychology from Georgetown University, and lives with his husband and daughter in Maryland.                

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Supporting Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Artists as Entrepreneurs

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for May 2019 will be about supporting artists as entrepreneurs.

    What skills do artists need to thrive as entrepreneurs?

    Join James Hart, Director of Arts Entrepreneurship and Professor of Practice with Southern Methodist University, Meadows School of the Arts as we discuss what Arts Entrepreneurship is, why students and early career artists need to think about their profession in this way, and how to support artists on their journey of becoming an Arts Entrepreneur. Be sure to bring your questions!



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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  • Ask an Expert: Mural Policy & Management

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/19/2019

    In this first of two Ask an Expert virtual conversations, attendees will have the opportunity to connect with experts in the field of mural policy development and management. Participants will gain insight into mural implementation, learn about available resources and more!

    image About this Conversation

    Murals can be a source of pride for communities and come with their own opportunities and challenges for public art program administrators. Mural policy development and management guidelines can be tools for administrators, artists and community members to utilize when implementing a mural. In this first of two Ask an Expert virtual conversations, attendees will have the opportunity to connect with experts in the field of mural policy development and management. Participants will gain insight into mural implementation, learn about available resources and more!

    Learning Objectives:

    • Hear from experts in the development and management of mural policies
    • Learn about resources available for the development and implementation of policies

    Tune into Part 2 of this series, Ask An Expert: Mural Implementation & Community Engagement, here: https://artsu.americansforthearts.org/products/ask-an-expert-mural-implementation-community-engagement

    Jane Golden

    Executive Director, Mural Arts Philadelphia

    Jane Golden has been the driving force of Mural Arts Philadelphia since 1984, overseeing its growth from a small city agency into the nation’s largest public art program. Under Golden’s direction, Mural Arts has created over 4,000 works of public art through innovative collaborations. In partnership with a range of city agencies, she has developed groundbreaking and rigorous programs that work through art to make strides in youth education, restorative justice, and behavioral health. Sought after nationally and internationally as an expert on urban transformation through art, Golden has received numerous awards for her work, including the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Award and Philadelphia Magazine’s Trailblazer Award. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and serves on the Mayor’s Cultural Advisory Council, the Penn Museum Advisory Committee, and the board of directors of The Heliotrope Foundation.

    Website: muralarts.org

    Twitter: @JaneSGolden  

    Karl LeClair

    Public Art Program Manager, Boise City Department of Arts & History

    Karl LeClair develops, manages, and promotes public art projects and cultural policies for the City of Boise’s Percent-for-Art Fund and Public Art Program. In collaboration with the Arts & History Commission, City departments, community organizations and citizens, he explores meaningful ways of incorporating artist driven projects into various aspects of the urban landscape. In addition to being an energetic and trusted team player in the Department of Arts & History, LeClair maintains an active artist studio practice rooted in printmaking but explores drawing and installation. LeClair’s work has been exhibited at the Boise Art Museum, Bend Art Center, and Ming Studios. He has a BFA in Art Education, Printmaking, and Art History from Boise State University.

    Website: https://www.boiseartsandhistory.org/  

    Twitter: @BoiArtAndHist  

  • Community Engagement: Ensuring the Future of the Arts

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/18/2019

    Audience engagement is NOT community engagement! Do we have your attention? Join us for a webinar on at 3:00PM EDT on April 18 with DougBorwick, CEO of ArtsEngaged, as we look at the differences between audience and community engagement and hear why Community engagement is a critical tool for achieving viability.

    image About this Webinar

    Nonprofit arts organizations are facing an existential crisis stemming from skyrocketing expenses, rapidly changing demographics, and vastly altered social expectations. Community engagement is a critical tool for achieving, at a minimum, viability. This webinar will address the following content:

    • Definitions: The conflation of audience development, audience engagement, and community engagement continues to be a significant roadblock to growth. They are all valuable but they are all substantially different from each other. It’s vital to understand how each can build an arts organization.
    • Effective Engagement: Once you understand what community engagement is, it is necessary to adhere to basic principles of relationship building to maximize the work’s benefit both to the arts organization and the community.
    • Engagement and Marketing: Community engagement should not be an add-on, optional afterthought for arts organizations. Instead, it provides insights that can (and, arguably, must) make the work of virtually all management functions significantly more productive. We will focus here–briefly given the time constraints–on marketing.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will:

    • Be able to articulate the differences among audience development, audience engagement, and community engagement.
    • Be able to apply principles of effective community engagement to evaluate community engagement projects
    • Be able to use understanding of the principles of effective community engagement to evaluate how community-focused (and therefore effective) arts marketing materials are.



    Doug Borwick

    CEO, ArtsEngaged

    Doug Borwick is author of Engaging Matters, a blog for ArtsJournal, author/editor of Building Communities, Not Audiences: The Future of the Arts in the U.S. and author of Engage Now! A Guide to Making the Arts Indispensable. One of the country's leading advocates for the arts and community engagement Dr. Borwick has served as keynote speaker and workshop presenter at conferences across the U.S. and Canada as well as in Australia, Beijing, and Singapore. Notably, he has been featured speaker for statewide arts gatherings in Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin as well as for the Canadian Arts Summit in Banff, Alberta. Barry Hessenius, author of Barry’s Blog and former Director of the California Arts Council and former President of the California Assembly of Local Arts Agencies, has described him as “the spokesperson for the importance and value of community engagement. [He] provides tools and thinking to improve your organization's operations in this area.”

    Dr. Borwick is past President of the Board of the Association of Arts Administration Educators, an international organization of higher education programs in the field. For three decades he served as Director of the Arts Management and Not-for-Profit Management Programs at Salem College in Winston-Salem, NC. Dr. Borwick is CEO of Outfitters4, Inc., providing management services for nonprofits and of ArtsEngaged, offering training and consultation services to artists and arts organizations seeking to more effectively engage with their communities. Dr. Borwick holds the Ph.D. in Music Composition from the Eastman School of Music and is an award-winning member of ASCAP. 

    Twitter: @arts_engaged and @DougBorwick  

    Website: www.artsengaged.com and www. artsjournal.com/engage

  • Reviewing the State of Equitable Investment Policies and Practices in the Local Arts Field

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/10/2019

    In this webinar, learn about both reports, including walking through the working group’s goals and recommendations for field action, discussing the findings from the Local Arts Agency Profile’s 2018 Equitable Investment Module, and talking about future work Americans for the Arts and others are investing in to begin turning research and discussion into action.

    image About this Webinar

    Each year the United States’ 4,500 local arts agencies (LAAs) collectively invest an estimated $2.8 billion in their local arts and culture ecosystems. This includes an estimated $600 million in direct investment in artists and arts and culture organizations through grants, contracts, and loans. This makes LAAs, collectively, the largest distributor of publicly-derived funds to arts and culture and one of the largest and steadiest underwriters of artists and creative workers in the United States. It is therefore crucial that LAAs employ a strong lens of equity to consider the full scope of their investments. 

    In February, Americans for the Arts released two reports—one a summary of working group findings and one a research report—revolving around how local arts agencies can center cultural equity in their investment strategies (grantmaking, people, space, staff, time). In this webinar, learn about both reports, including walking through the working group’s goals and recommendations for field action, discussing the findings from the Local Arts Agency Profile’s 2018 Equitable Investment Module, and talking about future work Americans for the Arts and others are investing in to begin turning research and discussion into action. If you would like to review the reports in advance, you can find both at the Americans for the Arts Cultural Equity research hub: https://www.americansforthearts.org/about-americans-for-the-arts/cultural-equity/research-reports.

    Participants will:

    • Hear an overview of results from the 2018 Local Arts Agency Profile: Equitable Investment Policies and Practices in the Local Arts Field module
    • Learn about local arts agency field trends for funding and resources
    • Learn about fair and equitable funding and resource distribution 

    Clay Lord

    Vice President of Local Arts Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Clayton Lord is the vice president of local arts advancement for Americans for the Arts, where he oversees advocacy, capacity development and cohort building for local arts administrators and advocates in 5,000 communities across the United States. Prior to joining Americans for the Arts, Lord served for five years as the director of communications and audience development for Theatre Bay Area. At Americans for the Arts, the local arts advancement department aims to empower, educate, and support local arts leaders, public artists and arts administrators, emerging, mid-career, and executive leaders throughout the arts sector, arts marketers, and artist-activists as they work to be constantly relevant and transformative in the lives of American citizens and communities.

    Lord shepherds the New Community Visions Initiative, a multi-year effort to better understand and support the changing role of the arts and local arts agencies in American communities, and Americans for the Arts’ ongoing initiatives around cultural equity, diversity, and inclusion. He is the chief architect of the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention and the Executive Leadership Forum at Sundance.

    Lord is a prolific writer, thinker, and speaker about the public value of the arts, and has written for ArtsLink, ARTSblog, Theatre Bay Area magazine, Stage DirectionsInDanceThe VoiceArtsJournal, ArtsMarketing.org and others. He has edited and contributed to three books: Counting New Beans: Intrinsic Impact and the Value of the ArtsArts & America: Arts, Culture and the Future of America’s Communities; and To Change the Face & Heart of America: Selected Writings on the Arts and Communities, 1949-1992 and is working on the forthcoming New Community Visions: A Blueprint for 21st Century Arts-Based Community Development, due out in 2017. He holds a B.A. in English and Psychology from Georgetown University, and lives with his husband and daughter in Maryland.                

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Legal Support for Artists

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/29/2019

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.

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    Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat

    Legal Support for Artists

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for March 2019 will be legal support for artists.


    Why exactly do artists need lawyers and legal support? 


    Join Adam Holofcener Esq., Executive Director of Maryland Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, for a discussion on how artists operate as a business and the types of situations they can find themselves in that have legal implications (both good and not so good).  Issues that artists generally encounter first involve copyright, contracts, and business entities. Artists do not need to become lawyers to practice their art in a fiscally/legally sustainable way, but they do need to know enough to know when to ask for help, as well as what resources are available that may be able to provide affordable help. 



    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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