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  • Supporting Individual Artists: LGBTQ Edition

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/10/2019

    The LGBTQ community is experiencing a moment of unprecedented visibility, and yet there remain many challenges and barriers to entry for LGBTQ artists. The City of West Hollywood has made a strong commitment to all artists and developed new programs focusing on the most underserved segments of the LGBTQ community. At the same time, the City has heard from the community that the Pride parade is becoming too commercial, and strove to balance that by creating a 40-day long LGBTQ Arts Festival which celebrates the history, art and culture of the LGBTQ community. Come hear from the City of West Hollywood regarding their specific efforts around individual LGBTQ artists, as well as from some of the grantees to hear what challenges are specific to the LGBTQ community and how best to support them.

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     About this Webinar

    The LGBTQ community is experiencing a moment of unprecedented visibility, and yet there remain many challenges and barriers to entry for LGBTQ artists. The City of West Hollywood has made a strong commitment to all artists and developed new programs focusing on the most underserved segments of the LGBTQ community. At the same time, the City has heard from the community that the Pride parade is becoming too commercial, and strove to balance that by creating a 40-day long LGBTQ Arts Festival which celebrates the history, art and culture of the LGBTQ community. Come hear from the City of West Hollywood regarding their specific efforts around individual LGBTQ artists, as well as from some of the grantees to hear what challenges are specific to the LGBTQ community and how best to support them.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    Mike Che

    Arts Coordinator, City of West Hollywood

    Mike Che is the City of West Hollywood’s Arts Coordinator. He spearheaded the program design and launch of the City’s Transgender Arts Initiative grant, the only grant of its kind in the country. He also manages the City’s One City One Pride LGBTQ Arts Festival, a 40-day long celebration of the LGBTQ community through the arts. He is currently a member of the ONE Archives Culture Series Advisory Committee; the LA County Department of Arts and Culture’s Cultural Equity and Inclusion Initiative Advisory Committee; and AftA’s Arts and Culture Leaders of Color Steering Committee.

    Websites: www.weho.org/arts, www.weho.org/pride

    Social Media

    Twitter: @wehoarts  

    Instagram: @wehoarts

    Facebook: @wehoarts  

    Brian Sonia-Wallace

    Artist

    Brian Sonia-Wallace is the founder and convener of #PridePoets, started in conjunction with the City of West Hollywood’s One City One Pride initiative, and grown from Brian’s business RENT Poet, which brings poets on typewriters to events to write custom poems. Brian has written for tech companies and governments, toured nationally and internationally, and been the Writer-in-Residence for everyone from the Mall of America to Amtrak to the Boston Harbor Islands. His first book of essays, Dust Bowl Nation, tracks his journey to find humanity at the margins of America through poetry, and is forthcoming from Harper Collins in 2020. Brian lives in Los Angeles, and believes that typewriter poetry is inherently queer, blurring the lines between public and private, intimacy and stranger, permanence and ephemerality.

    Websites: rentpoet.com and pridepoets.com

    Social Media

    Instagram: @rentpoet and @pridepoets 

    Twitter:@rentpoet and @pridepoets

    Yozmit

    Artist

    The self-given name Yozmit means 'myth about one’s self' : Through her ritualistic performance art, Yozmit combines theater, dance, pop culture, fashion, gender identity, mythology, and shamanism onto a single canvas. She is currently working on DoYou project - an awareness-based performance art campaign. DoYou means 'Do'ing 'You' – a process of becoming fully self-realized and acting upon by balancing the Sacred Feminine and The Sacred Masculine, using gender and identity as a subject.

    Yozmit is a international headliner at The Box in New York City and London. She has shown her work at Hollywood Fringe Festival, One City One Pride Arts Festival, Coachella Music Festival, Burning Man, Lucent Dossier, Joyce Soho, Redcat (Roy and Edna Disney/ CalArts Theater), Movement Research at The Judson Church, St. Marks Church, Lincoln Center, Art Basel, ChunCheon International Mime Festival, Life Ball, Doma International Art Festival, Joe's Pub, Santos Party House, Galapagos Art Space, Dixon Place, Supper Club, Webster Hall, Sleep No More, Hotel Americano, Standard Hotel, Mondrian Hotel and various other venues in New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, London, Paris, Ibiza, Berlin, Vienna, Sofia and Seoul. In 2010, Yozmit performed in Marina Abramović’s “The Artist is Present” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), NYC. 

    Websitehttp://www.yozmit.com/

    Instagram: @Yozmit

    YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/yozmitube

  • Creating a World Without Youth Prisons: Using Arts to Center Youth Voice in the Justice Movement

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/08/2019

    How can we use arts to create a world without youth prisons? Performing Statistics is a cultural organizing project that uses art to model, imagine, and advocate for alternatives to youth incarceration. In this webinar, participants will learn how Performing Statistics is using art to center youth impacted by the juvenile justice system in the movement to close youth prisons and invest in communities. The Performing Statistics Co-Directors will explain their process of art-making with youth and how they partner with organizers and advocates to ensure that young people most impacted by the juvenile justice system are connected to policymakers.

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     About this Webinar

    How can we use arts to create a world without youth prisons? Performing Statistics is a cultural organizing project that uses art to model, imagine, and advocate for alternatives to youth incarceration. In this webinar, participants will learn how Performing Statistics is using art to center youth impacted by the juvenile justice system in the movement to close youth prisons and invest in communities. The Performing Statistics Co-Directors will explain their process of art-making with youth and how they partner with organizers and advocates to ensure that young people most impacted by the juvenile justice system are connected to policymakers. 

    Learning Objectives

    • To learn more about the Performing Statistics project and the urgency of the youth justice movement
    • To learn about strategies for using art to affect systems change
    • To discuss the importance of centering impacted populations in policy change work
    • To gather tools for working with system-involved youth

    Trey Hartt

    Project Director, Performing Statistics

    Project Director Trey Hartt is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. As Project Director he ensures that the project’s operations are consistent with its values and creative processes, that people are cared for and properly resourced, and that the young people in the project have the resources they need to stay resilient. In 2006, he began working with The Conciliation Project, a Richmond-based social justice theatre company that ignites dialogue about racism in America. From there he worked at Virginians for the Arts advocating for state funding for the arts, Alternate ROOTS as the Resources for Social Change program coordinator, and then at the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities leading their fundraising efforts and programs for schools on issues of diversity and inclusion. Most recently, he was ART 180’s Deputy Director where he managed all administrative staff, led all fund development efforts, and supported special projects like Performing Statistics. Trey is Past President of Alternate ROOTS, a regional organization in the Southeast US that supports the creation and presentation of original art to eliminate oppression.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics

    Mark Strandquist

    Creative Director, Performing Statistics

    Creative Director Mark Strandquist is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. He ensures that the Performing Statistics creative processes are ethical, equitable, and rooted in radical imagination. A photographer and filmmaker by training, his work has received numerous awards, fellowships, national residencies, and reached wide audiences through The New York Times, The Guardian, NPR, The Washington Post, PBS Newshour, VICE, and a multitude of other news outlets. At the core of his practice is the belief that those most impacted by the criminal justice system are the experts society needs to listen to, and that by connecting those directly affected with a multitude of community experts and political stakeholders, change can be created on personal and systemic levels. In 2016, he and his partner Courtney Bowles were awarded A Blade of Grass fellowship for Socially Engaged Art to begin the Philadelphia Reentry Think Tank. Mark continues to co-direct the Reentry Think Tank in Philly in addition to the People’s Paper Co-Op.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics

    Gina Lyles

    Engagement Director, Performing Statistics

    Engagement Director Gina Lyles is part of the team of co-directors for Performing Statistics who guide the project’s direction. She supports the human-to-human connections that ground Performing Statistics in authentic relationships with youth, credible messenger mentors, and partners. Gina leverages her own life experiences as a self-described, “school-to-prison pipeline survivor” in and out of the foster care and juvenile justice systems since the age of eight, to navigate and empower youth caught in the school-to-prison pipeline. She began her journey with Performing Statistics at ART 180 as a program assistant for a hip hop class using her skills as an emcee and rapper to support kids at the middle school level. She soon was leading her own hip hop music and writing programs. When Performing Statistics was founded in 2014, Gina was the first program leader assisting in the implementation of the earliest creative programs and was promoted to Program Coordinator in 2015 after the project received its first major grant. After just a year, Gina became Program Manager and helped grow the project with a particular emphasis on the youth development and credible messenger mentoring aspects. Gina left ART 180 in 2019 to launch her own business, So Focused Consulting, LLC, before becoming the Performing Statistics Engagement Director.

    Website: www.performingstatistics.org and www.nomovement.com

    Facebook: @PerformingStatistics

    Instagram: @PerformingStatistics

  • Honoring Native Land

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/02/2019

    Honoring the Native land which you occupy acts as an expression of gratitude and appreciation for those whose territory you reside on. It is important to understand the history that has brought you to this land, as well as to seek to better understand your place and role in that history and connection to current context. Land acknowledgments, statements recognizing the relationships that exist between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories, are one form of such acknowledgment, but should only be the start of the conversation. This webinar, featuring Carly Bad Heart Bull of the Bush Foundation, will examine the importance of honoring Native land and how you can holistically incorporate this acknowledgment into your programming.

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     About this Webinar

    Honoring the Native land which you occupy acts as an expression of gratitude and appreciation for those whose territory you reside on.  It is important to understand the history that has brought you to this land, as well as to seek to better understand your place and role in that history and connection to current context. Land acknowledgments, statements recognizing the relationships that exist between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories, are one form of such acknowledgment, but should only be the start of the conversation. This webinar, featuring Carly Bad Heart Bull of the Bush Foundation, will examine the importance of honoring Native land and how you can holistically incorporate this acknowledgment into your programming. 

    Learning Objectives:

    • Why building relationships with Native communities, including through land acknowledgments, are important things to consider in your work
    • What to consider when crafting and implementing land acknowledgements
    • Why investing in Native country is important to the history and future of the United States

    Carly Bad Heart Bull

    Native Nations Activities Manager, Bush Foundation

    Carly (Bdewakantunwan Dakota and Muskogee Creek) is a proud citizen of the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in South Dakota and she lives in the Dakota homeland of Mnisota Makoce (Minnesota).

    Carly previously taught the Dakota language to High-5 and kindergarten students in South Minneapolis. After graduating from the University of Minnesota Law School, she worked as a law clerk for the presiding Family Court Judge for the 4th Judicial District and then as an Assistant County Attorney for the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office in its child protection division. She has also worked in the area of federal Indian law and represented families through the Indian Child Welfare Act Law Center. Currently, Carly is the Native Nations Activities Manager at the Bush Foundation, a regional funder whose focus is supporting community problem solving across Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and the 23 Native nations that share that same geography.  In this role, she works across all of the foundation’s program areas on their work serving Native communities. Carly serves on the board of directors of the national member-based organization, Native Americans in Philanthropy and is Vice-Chair of the board of a local non-profit and indigenous farm, Dream of Wild Health.

    Carly lives in South Minneapolis with her husband, Jay, and their 2 ½ year old son, Quill.  She loves to cook, read novels and rides horses when she can. 

    Website: https://www.bushfoundation.org/

  • Artists at the Community Development Table Online Classroom

    Contains 4 Product(s)

    Artists of all kinds have always been powerful influencers in the culture of any society. But the roles of artists are changing as the world both shrinks and expands through new means of communication and media. While many artists will continue to work solely - some are adding the practice of working in collaboration and with communities. This series is designed to provide usable information and research on how artists and arts organizations can deepen the capacity for community development and engagement. It will outline ideas about how to bring creativity and new thought to the conversations artists of all disciplines, local arts agencies, organizations, and their communities are having about how to collaborate across sectors, borders, and boundaries. While there are complexities and many layers to working in this way, these webinars aim to connect threads and make those complexities visible.

    image About this Classroom

    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Artists of all kinds have always been powerful influencers in the culture of any society. But the roles of artists are changing as the world both shrinks and expands through new means of communication and media. While many artists will continue to work solely - some are adding the practice of working in collaboration and with communities. This self-guided classroom is designed to provide usable information and research on how artists and arts organizations can deepen the capacity for community development and engagement. It will outline ideas about how to bring creativity and new thought to the conversations artists of all disciplines, local arts agencies, organizations, and their communities are having about how to collaborate across sectors, borders, and boundaries. While there are complexities and many layers to working in this way, these webinars aim to connect threads and make those complexities visible. 

    There are four modules of learning that are of equal importance and urgency in terms of efficacy and best practices for building and maintaining a creative and culturally competent community. It’s a methodology that considers equity in community culture, artists and agency, partnership and collaboration, and resources for all of the above. Each module contains webinars, interactive worksheets, and quizzes, all aimed at deepening participant's understand of arts-based community development. Participants are encouraged to go complete the course with a group of colleagues and learning partners.


    Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity

    Module 2: Artist Agency      

    Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations 

    Module 4: Assets and Support


    Classroom Learning Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    • Articulate a deeper understanding of the concepts of arts-based community development.
    • Define the complex layers of community.
    • Demonstrate how artists and creative people are part of those communities.
    • Embrace the philosophy of “With Not For”- working with and alongside people.



    This course is part of Americans for the Arts' Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Americans for the Arts gratefully acknowledges The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its support of this initiative.

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  • Module 4: Assets and Support

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    What do we need to do the work? In arts-based community development, with partners and collaborators across sectors, we look at the possibilities of ‘Arts and ______.’ The arts can be a means to cross sectors to non-arts disciplines, fields, and institutions and to access the funds available in these sectors. We can also look at assets beyond the financial with examining social capital, creative capital, and the validity of the process.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 4: Assets and Support


    What do we need to do the work? In arts-based community development, with partners and collaborators across sectors, we look at the possibilities of ‘Arts and ______.’ The arts can be a means to cross sectors to non-arts disciplines, fields, and institutions and to access the funds available in these sectors. We can also look at assets beyond the financial with examining social capital, creative capital, and the validity of the process. 


    Participants will:

    • Identify what is needed to support community development work.
    • Outline multiple sources of support.
    • Articulate the differences and the assets of social capital, creative capital, and financial support.
    • Examine the concept of and best practices for equity in funding.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Website: https://www.roseannweiss.com/ 

    Email: roseannweiss@gmail.com

    Con Christeson

    Community Artist

    Con is an artist exploring communities. She experiences community by observing pools of knowledge and experience that exist alongside historical rootedness and the complex concept of place. It is a topographical map of wind, weather, and time. It is the science of hard scape. It is multiple layers of memory and story. It is individual and institutional. It can reinforce or bury the human experience. 

    Con’s work is at the intersection of space and place, a collaboration between consciousness and creativity. She works locally, nationally, and internationally because those virtual lines drawn by humans on the surface of this planet are not real. And yet, she believes they slow us, confine us, stop us, turn us away from each other. 

    Email: con-sult@juno.com

  • Unleashing Your Data Driven User Experience Superhero

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/27/2019

    A happy customer is a returning customer! How can you use your data to create positive user experiences? This webinar looks at how to use basic analytics to make decisions that lead to authentic user interactions.

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     About this Webinar

    Creating happy user experiences (UX) depends on looking at your data. This webinar is designed to provide content managers across all skill levels the tools needed to use basic analytics to make content and layout decisions based on authentic user action rather than personal preference or best guesses. 

    We’ll move from concept to implementation using several high priority website components such as navigation, default page layouts, typography, and hero images. Participants will also learn how to master the mystical skill of effective mobile testing to ensure UX is reaching peak performance across all device types. 

    Questions will be fielded throughout the course of the session.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will:

    1. Develop data driven UX refinement skills and define conversion goals.
    2. Learn how to identify problems, apply context, then test solutions. 

    Drew McManus

    Arts Consultant

    Drew McManus may be Venture’s Principal but don’t let the title fool you into thinking he’s just a tech geek. He brings 20 years of global broad-based arts consulting experience to the table and helps clients break the cycle of choosing one-size-fits-none solutions and instead, deliver an option that allows them to get ahead of the tech curve instead of trying to catch up by going slower.

    With the vision of legacy support strategy and the delights of creative insights, his mission is to deliver a sophisticated next generation technology designed especially for our business. The first step in that journey began in 2010 when he released The Venture Platform, a purpose-designed managed website development solution designed especially for arts organizations and artists.

    His expertise spans across multiple sectors and regularly quoted as an industry expert in media outlets including the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Dallas Daily News, The Guardian Unlimited, and the Melbourne Age along with more than 100 additional newspapers, trade journals, and magazine outlets. Broadcast appearances include NPR’s All Things Considered, NPR’s Weekend Edition, MPR’s Morning Edition, WQXR’s Conducting Business, WNYC’s Soundcheck, CBC One’s Definitely Not The Opera, and SoundNotion.TV along with two dozen additional regional market appearances.

    As a sought-after speaker and panelist, he has worked with the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network, Opera America, Americans for the Ats, National Arts Marketing Project Conference, Southeastern Theatre Conference, National Performing Arts Conference, Chamber Music America, NewMusicBox, The Conductors Guild, the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians, and the International Conference of Symphony Orchestra Musicians. He’s been a featured lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Bolz Center for Arts Administration, Northwestern University School of Music, Eastman School of Music, and Arizona State University. In 2011, he was featured presenter for Chicago’s TEDx Michigan Ave conference.

    For fun, he writes a daily blog about the orchestra business, provides a platform for arts insiders to speak their mind, leads a team of intrepid arts pros to hack the arts, founded a free arts admin jobs board, and loves a good coffee drink.

    He currently resides in Chicago’s Streeterville neighborhood with his wife, violinist, Holly Mulcahy.


    Websites

    https://ventureindustriesonline.com/

    https://artshacker.com/

    https://adaptistration.com/

    Social Media

    Twitter: @Adaptistration and @VentureTweets



  • Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In the first module, we begin with terms and concepts that will lead us to develop shared language and shared content. As we begin the process of community development, how do we experience and enable listening and language and get comfortable with authentic engagement and relationship building? We explore the ideas of cultural competency and equity as decisions are made in and about communities. We ask: How do we respect and honor all the stories of these communities?

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity


    In the first module, we begin with terms and concepts that will lead us to develop shared language and shared content. As we begin the process of community development, how do we experience and enable listening and language and get comfortable with authentic engagement and relationship building? We explore the ideas of cultural competency and equity as decisions are made in and about communities. We ask, "How do we respect and honor all the stories of these communities?" 


    Participants will:

    • Gain an understanding of communication through models and discussion of communication theory.
    • Realize the importance of effective communication in developing cultural competency.      
    • Recognize the multiple roles of community members in inclusive community development.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 2

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Website: https://www.roseannweiss.com/ 

    Email: roseannweiss@gmail.com

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Pacia Elaine (Anderson) is a St. Louis-based written, spoken, visual, and teaching Word Artist. She is a graduate of the Community Arts Training Institute, an Urban Bushwomen SLI Alumnus, a founding member of the art-based youth initiative Cherokee Street Reach, and serves as a Dean in the Zakatu Madrasa. Pacia is chair of the St. Louis Brick City Poetry Festival and a Missouri Regional Coordinator for the NEA-sponsored Poetry Out Loud youth recitation competition. Liaison for the Great Rivers Greenway Artists of Color Council, Pacia is also a consulting artist and facilitator with Americans for the Arts’ Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Pacia is a Steering Committee member for the Gravois-Jefferson Historic Neighborhoods Plan and does extensive community work in the Cherokee Street Community Improvement District. She has served as Curation Assistant to Inaugural St. Louis Poet Laureate Dr. Michael Castro, is a past Springboard to Learning Professional Development Facilitator for teaching artistsand has collaborated as a teaching artist and consultant with numerous schools, non-profit, and community-based organizations, both locally and nationally.  In 2016, Pacia released her first spoken word poetry album titled circa.ep. Her work has been published in collections, anthologies, and media such as Drumvoices RevueCrossing the Divide, and All the Art. Her first collection of poetry and writing is forthcoming.

    Website: www.paciaelaine.com

    Email: paciaanderson@gmail.com

  • Module 2: Artist Agency

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    What does it mean and what changes when an artist is at the community development table? Here we explicitly look at how artists engage, take risks, invest time, talent, and commitment. And we look at how the community across sectors can understand the value of artists’ perspectives, creativity, and experiences. Creativity help participants reach across the table, move across the street, and across community sectors.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 2: Artist Agency


    What does it mean and what changes when an artist is at the community development table?  Here we explicitly look at how artists engage, take risks, invest time, talent, and commitment. And we look at how the community across sectors can understand the value of artists’ perspectives, creativity, and experiences. Creativity help participants reach across the table, move across the street, and across community sectors. 


    Participants will:

    • Identify creativity and the creative process as powerful tools for community development including the notion of “process over product”.
    • Define the concept of artists and their personal agency as a powerful element in community context and development.
    • Analyze how artists work with communities and what constitutes authentic community engagement.
    • Synthesize concepts of communication, culture, creativity, and collaboration as parts of the big picture of community development.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 3

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Website: https://www.roseannweiss.com/ 

    Email: roseannweiss@gmail.com

    Con Christeson

    Community Artist

    Con is an artist exploring communities. She experiences community by observing pools of knowledge and experience that exist alongside historical rootedness and the complex concept of place. It is a topographical map of wind, weather, and time. It is the science of hard scape. It is multiple layers of memory and story. It is individual and institutional. It can reinforce or bury the human experience. 

    Con’s work is at the intersection of space and place, a collaboration between consciousness and creativity. She works locally, nationally, and internationally because those virtual lines drawn by humans on the surface of this planet are not real. And yet, she believes they slow us, confine us, stop us, turn us away from each other. 

    Email: con-sult@juno.com

  • Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    This module dives into what it takes to work together in arts-based community development. Here we look at what the elements are of both partnership and collaboration. As we lay the groundwork, there are ways to check assumptions and promote understanding as we agree to and manage outcomes and evaluation criteria. Partnerships and collaborations form maps of relationships, actions, and expectations.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations


    This module dives into what it takes to work together in arts-based community development. Here we look at what the elements are of both partnership and collaboration. As we lay the groundwork, there are ways to check assumptions and promote understanding as we agree to and manage outcomes and evaluation criteria. Partnerships and collaborations form maps of relationships, actions, and expectations. 


    Participants will:

    • Define and compare what makes a successful partnership and what makes a successful collaboration.
    • Explore the concept of power dynamics and how it applies to community development and relationships.
    • Review program models that illustrate how to successfully enter, work with, and exit a community.
    • Understand the notion of accountability and ‘who holds the stories’ of a community including ethical sharing and archiving in a community.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 4

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Website: https://www.roseannweiss.com/ 

    Email: roseannweiss@gmail.com

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Pacia Elaine (Anderson) is a St. Louis-based written, spoken, visual, and teaching Word Artist. She is a graduate of the Community Arts Training Institute, an Urban Bushwomen SLI Alumnus, a founding member of the art-based youth initiative Cherokee Street Reach, and serves as a Dean in the Zakatu Madrasa. Pacia is chair of the St. Louis Brick City Poetry Festival and a Missouri Regional Coordinator for the NEA-sponsored Poetry Out Loud youth recitation competition. Liaison for the Great Rivers Greenway Artists of Color Council, Pacia is also a consulting artist and facilitator with Americans for the Arts’ Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Pacia is a Steering Committee member for the Gravois-Jefferson Historic Neighborhoods Plan and does extensive community work in the Cherokee Street Community Improvement District. She has served as Curation Assistant to Inaugural St. Louis Poet Laureate Dr. Michael Castro, is a past Springboard to Learning Professional Development Facilitator for teaching artistsand has collaborated as a teaching artist and consultant with numerous schools, non-profit, and community-based organizations, both locally and nationally.  In 2016, Pacia released her first spoken word poetry album titled circa.ep. Her work has been published in collections, anthologies, and media such as Drumvoices RevueCrossing the Divide, and All the Art. Her first collection of poetry and writing is forthcoming.

    Website: www.paciaelaine.com

    Email: paciaanderson@gmail.com

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Disaster Support for Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/26/2019

    What types of disaster support do artists need in order to ensure they continue to thrive? Join us on September 26 at 2:00PM EDT for a conversation with Carrie Cleveland from CERF+ as we talk about the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies and how we can work together to build an artist’s safety net.

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    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for September 2019 will be about disaster support for individual artists.

    What types of disaster support do artists need to thrive?

    Join Carrie Cleveland, Education + Outreach Manager with CERF+, for a conversation about disaster support for artists. Carrie will talk about wow CERF+ has  expanded its work from emergency relief to include serving artists BEFORE emergencies and the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies; building the artists safety net: how we can work together to keep artists working; what resources CERF+ has available to support artists in your community.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Carrie Cleveland

    Education + Outreach Manager, CERF+

    Carrie Cleveland is the Education + Outreach Manager at CERF+ where she has held various other positions since 2008. During this time, she has participated in all aspects of the organization’s work to help artists have resilient careers, from counseling artists seeking emergency assistance to spearheading $100,000 fundraising appeals to teaching emergency preparedness workshops across the United States and territories. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history, with extensive work in the visual arts, from Marlboro College and prior to her time at CERF+ she spent several years living in New York City where she was an entomologist’s assistant by day and a tenor saxophone player by night. Carrie’s work stems from a drive to empower people to have agency in their careers and lives, and to help remove barriers to access. In addition to her work at CERF+, Carrie is a student of Facilitated Communication, an alternative communication method to support people with disabilities; and she is also a beginning metalsmith.

    Website: www.cerfplus.org

    Twitter: @cerfplus

    Facebook: facebook.com/cerfplus