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  • Artists at the Community Development Table Online Classroom

    Contains 4 Product(s)

    Artists of all kinds have always been powerful influencers in the culture of any society. But the roles of artists are changing as the world both shrinks and expands through new means of communication and media. While many artists will continue to work solely - some are adding the practice of working in collaboration and with communities. This series is designed to provide usable information and research on how artists and arts organizations can deepen the capacity for community development and engagement. It will outline ideas about how to bring creativity and new thought to the conversations artists of all disciplines, local arts agencies, organizations, and their communities are having about how to collaborate across sectors, borders, and boundaries. While there are complexities and many layers to working in this way, these webinars aim to connect threads and make those complexities visible.

    image About this Classroom

    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Artists of all kinds have always been powerful influencers in the culture of any society. But the roles of artists are changing as the world both shrinks and expands through new means of communication and media. While many artists will continue to work solely - some are adding the practice of working in collaboration and with communities. This self-guided classroom is designed to provide usable information and research on how artists and arts organizations can deepen the capacity for community development and engagement. It will outline ideas about how to bring creativity and new thought to the conversations artists of all disciplines, local arts agencies, organizations, and their communities are having about how to collaborate across sectors, borders, and boundaries. While there are complexities and many layers to working in this way, these webinars aim to connect threads and make those complexities visible. 

    There are four modules of learning that are of equal importance and urgency in terms of efficacy and best practices for building and maintaining a creative and culturally competent community. It’s a methodology that considers equity in community culture, artists and agency, partnership and collaboration, and resources for all of the above. Each module contains webinars, interactive worksheets, and quizzes, all aimed at deepening participant's understand of arts-based community development. Participants are encouraged to go complete the course with a group of colleagues and learning partners.


    Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity

    Module 2: Artist Agency      

    Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations 

    Module 4: Assets and Support


    Classroom Learning Objectives

    Participants will be able to:

    • Articulate a deeper understanding of the concepts of arts-based community development.
    • Define the complex layers of community.
    • Demonstrate how artists and creative people are part of those communities.
    • Embrace the philosophy of “With Not For”- working with and alongside people.



    This course is part of Americans for the Arts' Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Americans for the Arts gratefully acknowledges The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its support of this initiative.

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  • Module 4: Assets and Support

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    What do we need to do the work? In arts-based community development, with partners and collaborators across sectors, we look at the possibilities of ‘Arts and ______.’ The arts can be a means to cross sectors to non-arts disciplines, fields, and institutions and to access the funds available in these sectors. We can also look at assets beyond the financial with examining social capital, creative capital, and the validity of the process.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 4: Assets and Support


    What do we need to do the work? In arts-based community development, with partners and collaborators across sectors, we look at the possibilities of ‘Arts and ______.’ The arts can be a means to cross sectors to non-arts disciplines, fields, and institutions and to access the funds available in these sectors. We can also look at assets beyond the financial with examining social capital, creative capital, and the validity of the process. 


    Participants will:

    • Identify what is needed to support community development work.
    • Outline multiple sources of support.
    • Articulate the differences and the assets of social capital, creative capital, and financial support.
    • Examine the concept of and best practices for equity in funding.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Con Christeson

    Community Artist

    Con is an artist exploring communities. She experiences community by observing pools of knowledge and experience that exist alongside historical rootedness and the complex concept of place. It is a topographical map of wind, weather, and time. It is the science of hard scape. It is multiple layers of memory and story. It is individual and institutional. It can reinforce or bury the human experience. 

    Con’s work is at the intersection of space and place, a collaboration between consciousness and creativity. She works locally, nationally, and internationally because those virtual lines drawn by humans on the surface of this planet are not real. And yet, she believes they slow us, confine us, stop us, turn us away from each other. 

  • Unleashing Your Data Driven User Experience Superhero

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/27/2019

    A happy customer is a returning customer! How can you use your data to create positive user experiences? This webinar looks at how to use basic analytics to make decisions that lead to authentic user interactions.

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     About this Webinar

    Creating happy user experiences (UX) depends on looking at your data. This webinar is designed to provide content managers across all skill levels the tools needed to use basic analytics to make content and layout decisions based on authentic user action rather than personal preference or best guesses. 

    We’ll move from concept to implementation using several high priority website components such as navigation, default page layouts, typography, and hero images. Participants will also learn how to master the mystical skill of effective mobile testing to ensure UX is reaching peak performance across all device types. 

    Questions will be fielded throughout the course of the session.

    Learning Objectives

    Participants will:

    1. Develop data driven UX refinement skills and define conversion goals.
    2. Learn how to identify problems, apply context, then test solutions. 

    Drew McManus

    Arts Consultant

    Drew McManus may be Venture’s Principal but don’t let the title fool you into thinking he’s just a tech geek. He brings 20 years of global broad-based arts consulting experience to the table and helps clients break the cycle of choosing one-size-fits-none solutions and instead, deliver an option that allows them to get ahead of the tech curve instead of trying to catch up by going slower.

    With the vision of legacy support strategy and the delights of creative insights, his mission is to deliver a sophisticated next generation technology designed especially for our business. The first step in that journey began in 2010 when he released The Venture Platform, a purpose-designed managed website development solution designed especially for arts organizations and artists.

    His expertise spans across multiple sectors and regularly quoted as an industry expert in media outlets including the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, the Washington Post, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Dallas Daily News, The Guardian Unlimited, and the Melbourne Age along with more than 100 additional newspapers, trade journals, and magazine outlets. Broadcast appearances include NPR’s All Things Considered, NPR’s Weekend Edition, MPR’s Morning Edition, WQXR’s Conducting Business, WNYC’s Soundcheck, CBC One’s Definitely Not The Opera, and SoundNotion.TV along with two dozen additional regional market appearances.

    As a sought-after speaker and panelist, he has worked with the Nonprofit Technology Enterprise Network, Opera America, Americans for the Ats, National Arts Marketing Project Conference, Southeastern Theatre Conference, National Performing Arts Conference, Chamber Music America, NewMusicBox, The Conductors Guild, the Organization of Canadian Symphony Musicians, and the International Conference of Symphony Orchestra Musicians. He’s been a featured lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Bolz Center for Arts Administration, Northwestern University School of Music, Eastman School of Music, and Arizona State University. In 2011, he was featured presenter for Chicago’s TEDx Michigan Ave conference.

    For fun, he writes a daily blog about the orchestra business, provides a platform for arts insiders to speak their mind, leads a team of intrepid arts pros to hack the arts, founded a free arts admin jobs board, and loves a good coffee drink.

    He currently resides in Chicago’s Streeterville neighborhood with his wife, violinist, Holly Mulcahy.


    Websites

    https://ventureindustriesonline.com/

    https://artshacker.com/

    https://adaptistration.com/

    Social Media

    Twitter: @Adaptistration and @VentureTweets



  • Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In the first module, we begin with terms and concepts that will lead us to develop shared language and shared content. As we begin the process of community development, how do we experience and enable listening and language and get comfortable with authentic engagement and relationship building? We explore the ideas of cultural competency and equity as decisions are made in and about communities. We ask: How do we respect and honor all the stories of these communities?

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 1: Community + Culture + Equity


    In the first module, we begin with terms and concepts that will lead us to develop shared language and shared content. As we begin the process of community development, how do we experience and enable listening and language and get comfortable with authentic engagement and relationship building? We explore the ideas of cultural competency and equity as decisions are made in and about communities. We ask, "How do we respect and honor all the stories of these communities?" 


    Participants will:

    • Gain an understanding of communication through models and discussion of communication theory.
    • Realize the importance of effective communication in developing cultural competency.      
    • Recognize the multiple roles of community members in inclusive community development.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 2

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Pacia Elaine (Anderson) is a St. Louis-based written, spoken, visual, and teaching Word Artist. She is a graduate of the Community Arts Training Institute, an Urban Bushwomen SLI Alumnus, a founding member of the art-based youth initiative Cherokee Street Reach, and serves as a Dean in the Zakatu Madrasa. Pacia is chair of the St. Louis Brick City Poetry Festival and a Missouri Regional Coordinator for the NEA-sponsored Poetry Out Loud youth recitation competition. Liaison for the Great Rivers Greenway Artists of Color Council, Pacia is also a consulting artist and facilitator with Americans for the Arts’ Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Pacia is a Steering Committee member for the Gravois-Jefferson Historic Neighborhoods Plan and does extensive community work in the Cherokee Street Community Improvement District. She has served as Curation Assistant to Inaugural St. Louis Poet Laureate Dr. Michael Castro, is a past Springboard to Learning Professional Development Facilitator for teaching artistsand has collaborated as a teaching artist and consultant with numerous schools, non-profit, and community-based organizations, both locally and nationally.  In 2016, Pacia released her first spoken word poetry album titled circa.ep. Her work has been published in collections, anthologies, and media such as Drumvoices RevueCrossing the Divide, and All the Art. Her first collection of poetry and writing is forthcoming.

  • Module 2: Artist Agency

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    What does it mean and what changes when an artist is at the community development table? Here we explicitly look at how artists engage, take risks, invest time, talent, and commitment. And we look at how the community across sectors can understand the value of artists’ perspectives, creativity, and experiences. Creativity help participants reach across the table, move across the street, and across community sectors.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 2: Artist Agency


    What does it mean and what changes when an artist is at the community development table?  Here we explicitly look at how artists engage, take risks, invest time, talent, and commitment. And we look at how the community across sectors can understand the value of artists’ perspectives, creativity, and experiences. Creativity help participants reach across the table, move across the street, and across community sectors. 


    Participants will:

    • Identify creativity and the creative process as powerful tools for community development including the notion of “process over product”.
    • Define the concept of artists and their personal agency as a powerful element in community context and development.
    • Analyze how artists work with communities and what constitutes authentic community engagement.
    • Synthesize concepts of communication, culture, creativity, and collaboration as parts of the big picture of community development.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 3

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Con Christeson

    Community Artist

    Con is an artist exploring communities. She experiences community by observing pools of knowledge and experience that exist alongside historical rootedness and the complex concept of place. It is a topographical map of wind, weather, and time. It is the science of hard scape. It is multiple layers of memory and story. It is individual and institutional. It can reinforce or bury the human experience. 

    Con’s work is at the intersection of space and place, a collaboration between consciousness and creativity. She works locally, nationally, and internationally because those virtual lines drawn by humans on the surface of this planet are not real. And yet, she believes they slow us, confine us, stop us, turn us away from each other. 

  • Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    This module dives into what it takes to work together in arts-based community development. Here we look at what the elements are of both partnership and collaboration. As we lay the groundwork, there are ways to check assumptions and promote understanding as we agree to and manage outcomes and evaluation criteria. Partnerships and collaborations form maps of relationships, actions, and expectations.

    imageAbout this Lesson


    Artists at the Community Development Table

    Module 3: Partnerships and Collaborations


    This module dives into what it takes to work together in arts-based community development. Here we look at what the elements are of both partnership and collaboration. As we lay the groundwork, there are ways to check assumptions and promote understanding as we agree to and manage outcomes and evaluation criteria. Partnerships and collaborations form maps of relationships, actions, and expectations. 


    Participants will:

    • Define and compare what makes a successful partnership and what makes a successful collaboration.
    • Explore the concept of power dynamics and how it applies to community development and relationships.
    • Review program models that illustrate how to successfully enter, work with, and exit a community.
    • Understand the notion of accountability and ‘who holds the stories’ of a community including ethical sharing and archiving in a community.


    This module includes:

    • A webinar
    • An interactive worksheet
    • A quiz


    Continue to Module 4

    Roseann Weiss

    Creative Advisor

    Roseann Weiss is a creative advisor and strategist about the intersections of art and community working independently as ART +. She has 30 years of experience in arts leadership in nonprofit arts institutions, community organizations, and gallery settings. Her expertise centers in arts-based community development, community and public arts, artists' professional development, and grant-making. For 14 years, she guided the Community Arts Training (CAT) Institute at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission, which is an innovative, cross-sector program designed around art as a powerful agent for social change. Among her current projects are Lead Educator for Arts as Civic Engagement program at the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at Washington University and working with Americans for the Arts to create guides, webinars, and workshops for “Artists at the Community Development Table.”

    Pacia Elaine Anderson

    Spoken Word Artist

    Pacia Elaine (Anderson) is a St. Louis-based written, spoken, visual, and teaching Word Artist. She is a graduate of the Community Arts Training Institute, an Urban Bushwomen SLI Alumnus, a founding member of the art-based youth initiative Cherokee Street Reach, and serves as a Dean in the Zakatu Madrasa. Pacia is chair of the St. Louis Brick City Poetry Festival and a Missouri Regional Coordinator for the NEA-sponsored Poetry Out Loud youth recitation competition. Liaison for the Great Rivers Greenway Artists of Color Council, Pacia is also a consulting artist and facilitator with Americans for the Arts’ Artists at the Community Development Table initiative. Pacia is a Steering Committee member for the Gravois-Jefferson Historic Neighborhoods Plan and does extensive community work in the Cherokee Street Community Improvement District. She has served as Curation Assistant to Inaugural St. Louis Poet Laureate Dr. Michael Castro, is a past Springboard to Learning Professional Development Facilitator for teaching artistsand has collaborated as a teaching artist and consultant with numerous schools, non-profit, and community-based organizations, both locally and nationally.  In 2016, Pacia released her first spoken word poetry album titled circa.ep. Her work has been published in collections, anthologies, and media such as Drumvoices RevueCrossing the Divide, and All the Art. Her first collection of poetry and writing is forthcoming.

  • Supporting Individual Artists Coffee Chat: Disaster Support for Artists

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/26/2019

    What types of disaster support do artists need in order to ensure they continue to thrive? Join us on September 26 at 2:00PM EDT for a conversation with Carrie Cleveland from CERF+ as we talk about the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies and how we can work together to build an artist’s safety net.

    image

    About this Conversation

    Americans for the Arts is excited to bring you a monthly series of informal discussions about supporting individual artists. As part of Americans for the Arts ongoing program, Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists, these monthly "Coffee Chats" are your opportunity to hear from individuals and organizations in the arts and culture field that support individual artists as part of their everyday work. Each month, we will bring you a new topic to support your work with artists. Our topic for September 2019 will be about disaster support for individual artists.

    What types of disaster support do artists need to thrive?

    Join Carrie Cleveland, Education + Outreach Manager with CERF+, for a conversation about disaster support for artists. Carrie will talk about wow CERF+ has  expanded its work from emergency relief to include serving artists BEFORE emergencies and the specific needs of artists before and after emergencies; building the artists safety net: how we can work together to keep artists working; what resources CERF+ has available to support artists in your community.


    This project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

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    Carrie Cleveland

    Education + Outreach Manager, CERF+

    Carrie Cleveland is the Education + Outreach Manager at CERF+ where she has held various other positions since 2008. During this time, she has participated in all aspects of the organization’s work to help artists have resilient careers, from counseling artists seeking emergency assistance to spearheading $100,000 fundraising appeals to teaching emergency preparedness workshops across the United States and territories. She holds a bachelor’s degree in history, with extensive work in the visual arts, from Marlboro College and prior to her time at CERF+ she spent several years living in New York City where she was an entomologist’s assistant by day and a tenor saxophone player by night. Carrie’s work stems from a drive to empower people to have agency in their careers and lives, and to help remove barriers to access. In addition to her work at CERF+, Carrie is a student of Facilitated Communication, an alternative communication method to support people with disabilities; and she is also a beginning metalsmith.

    Website: www.cerfplus.org

    Twitter: @cerfplus

    Facebook: facebook.com/cerfplus

  • Supporting Individual Artists: Literary Artist Edition

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/25/2019

    How can organizations support literary artists as they strive to advance their work? Join Carla Du Pree, fiction author and Executive Director of CityLit Project, as well as artists Andrew Simonet and Christina Chiu, for a webinar as we explore ways that organizations can offer support and opportunities to literary artists, as well as how artists can engage with the larger literary community, and what resources are available to them.

    image About this Webinar

    September 25, 2019 at 3:00PM EDT

    Throughout the Maryland region, CityLit Project creates enthusiasm for the literary arts by connecting a community of avid readers and writers, creating opportunities for diverse audiences and by crafting experiences. Events produced throughout the year are designed to advance the cause of empowering language and writing skills in light of a changing publishing industry, and advancing and amplifying voices of people of color, as well as those not necessarily affiliated with a learning institution. 

    Join Carla Du Pree, an author of fiction and the executive director of CityLit Project, to learn how to navigate methods of support within cultural institutions and beyond. This webinar is designed to suggest the many ways an independent artist can engage with a larger literary community, seek resources that will advance their work and partake in opportunities that are within and outside of the region. It is also for organizations looking for ways to broaden their scope where it concerns writers, and to extend opportunities to support writers in their direct and regional communities in a myriad of ways. Carla will be joined by two working literary artists, applauded for their meaningful work, who will discuss their roles within their affiliated organizations, and the support systems they have in place and have generated over the years for their own work. Novelists Andrew Simonet, founder of Artists U and Christina Chiu, curator and co-host of Pen Parentis Literary Salon share their insights and collective wisdoms from living as artists helping artists. The outcome will be to enrich the concept of support specifically designed for writers while providing new ways to connect with the larger literary community, and to broaden the number of resources both regional and national for supporting the professional development of writers.

    Participants will learn

    • How literary artists can increase their efforts in designing a creative life for themselves and look for various pathways outside the norm.
    • To create ways for literary artists to thrive in a creative way of being, even when they’re not actively engaged in the act of writing.
    • How to build a stronger, writing network
    • How to engage literary artists in their work, to take risks, and to apply and submit.



    This Arts Administrators Essentials: Supporting Individual Artists project is supported in part by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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    CityLit Project is supported by the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation, the Maryland State Arts Council, Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts, T. Rowe Price, William G. Baker, Jr. Memorial Fund, Maryland Humanities, and Insight 180.

    Carla Du Pree

    Author, Executive Director, CityLit Project

    Carla Du Pree is a literary artist and consultant, a national and state arts ambassador, and an advocate for the arts. She’s featured regional and transnational authors at festivals and workshops and has produced award-winning programs: the daylong CityLit Festival and HoCoPoLitSo’s The Writing Life. Her literary work appeared on the debut of “Words” on Maryland Public Television’s Artworks. Her short stories and excerpts from her novel have appeared in The Pierian Literary Journal, Callaloo, Potomac Review, a Special Fiction and Poetry edition of City Paper - Baltimore, and anthologies The Spirit of Pregnancy and Street Lights: Illuminating Tales of the Urban Black Experience. She was also a contributor of Women in Clothes.

    She’s the recipient of a Rubys Artist Award, a Maryland State Arts Council Award for fiction, and fellowships with the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Rhode Island Writers Colony for writers of color and the prestigious Hedgebrook, along with Whiting and Poetry Foundation fellowships for Facing It: The Poetry of Yusef Komunyakaa and The Living Truth: The Life and Work of Nikki Giovanni, for her novel in progress. She’s written and produced two plays, served on the One Maryland One Book Selection Committee, as a county/state judge for the National Endowment for the Arts’ (NEA) Poetry Out Loud competition, and on the NEA’s Big Read Committee.

    With a Masters from the Johns Hopkins University - Writing Seminars, she’s a former adjunct professor, active on four boards, the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, Maryland State Arts Council, Maryland Citizens for the Arts, and Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance. She serves as an advisor with Modell Lyric Education Advisory Council, Baltimore Cultural Alliance Network, Arts Administrators of Color - DMV, mentors regional poets and writers, and most recently joined NASAA’s People of Color Affinity Group.

    Website: citylitproject.org

    Twitter: @citylitproject and @darkndifferent

    Instagram: @citylitproject and @darkndifferent

    Andrew Simonet

    Founder, Artists U

    Andrew Simonet is writer and choreographer in Philadelphia. From 1993 to 2013, he co-directed Headlong Dance Theater, creating dances like CELL (a journey for one audience member guided by your cell phone), and This Town is a Mystery (dances by four Philadelphia families in their homes). In 2013, he left Headlong to focus on writing. His debut novel, Wilder, was published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux in 2018.

    In 2006, Andrew founded Artists U, an incubator for helping artists make sustainable lives with programs in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and South Carolina. He wrote Making Your Life as an Artist, an open source guide to living as an artist. He is on the leadership team for the Tremaine Foundation’s Artists Thrive initiative, the Artist Parent Residencies Working Group, and Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program.

    He has received a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, an Independence Fellowship in the Arts, a Bessie for Choreography at the New York Dance and Performance Awards, and residencies at Yaddo, Ucross, The Studios of Key West, and Hambidge. His performance work has been supported by The Creative Capital Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Pew Trusts, Rockefeller Foundation, Japan Foundation, and New England Foundation for the Arts, and produced by Dance Theater Workshop (NYC), The Kyoto Art Center, P.S. 122 (NYC), Central Park Summerstage, The Jade Festival (Tokyo), The Philadelphia Live Arts Festival, The Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art. He lives in West Philadelphia with his wife, theater director K. Elizabeth Stevens, and their sons Jesse Tiger and Nico Wolf.

    Website: http://www.artistsu.org and https://www.andrewsimonet.com

    Twitter: @andrewSimonet

    Christine Chiu

    Curator and Co-Host, Pen Parentis Literary Salon

    Christina Chiu is the winner of the James Alan McPherson Award. Her novel, Beauty, is available for pre-order, with a publication date of May 2020. She is also author of Troublemaker and Other Saints, published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in 2001, Troublemaker was the alternate selection for BOMC and QPB, a nominee for a BOMC First Fiction Award, and winner of the Asian American Literary Award. 

    Chiu has published in magazines and anthologies, including Tin House, Charlie Chan is Dead 2, Not the Only One, Washington Square, World Wide Writers, The MacGuffin, the Asian Pacific American Journal, Acorn, Grandmothers: Granddaughters Remember, and Not the Only One. Her stories have won awards and honorable mention in literary contests such as Playboy, Glimmer Train, New Millennium, New York Stories, World Wide Writers, Explorations, and El Dorado Writers’ Guild.

    The recipient of the Asian American Literary Award, Chiu also received the Robert Simpson Fellowship, the Alternate Selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club, the Van Lier Fellowship; she won the New Stone Circle Fiction Contest, won second place in the Playboy Fiction Contest, and was nominated for the Stephen Crane First Fiction Award. She has been a Wiepersdorf Fellow and a Claire Woolrich Scholar. 

    Chiu curates and co-hosts the Pen Parentis Literary Salons in New York City. She received her MFA in writing from Columbia University.

    Website: www.christinachiu.org and www.penparentis.org

    Twitter: @chrischiu13

  • Counternarratives: Rethinking Teaching Artistry

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    In this interactive session participants will join a lively conversation between teaching artist, Jeannette Rodriguez Pineda, and researcher-writer, Dennie Palmer Wolf. Referencing Animating Democracy’s Aesthetic Perspectives framework, these two thinkers and activists will discuss key points from the Teaching Artist Companion to the framework, which they co-authored. In the Companion, they explore how teaching artists introduce young people to the many ways in which the arts build identity, reclaim life narratives, raise questions, and speak out for social change. The session will feature visual arts work done with young women who are court involved and middle school classrooms where theater is a forum for out-loud empathy.

    image About this Webinar

    October 22, 2019 at 2:00PM EDT

    In this interactive session, participants will join a lively conversation between teaching artist, Jeannette Rodriguez Pineda, and researcher-writer, Dennie Palmer Wolf. Referencing Animating Democracy’s Aesthetic Perspectives framework, these two thinkers and activists will discuss key points from the Teaching Artist Companion to the framework, which they co-authored.  In the Companion, they explore how teaching artists introduce young people to the many ways in which the arts build identity, reclaim life narratives, raise questions, and speak out for social change. The session will feature visual arts work done with young women who are court involved and middle school classrooms where theater is a forum for out-loud empathy.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Get an introduction to the framework, Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change
    • Learn how the framework provides a powerful language for capturing and communicating the work of teaching artists
    • Experience how the framework can inform teaching artistry in fields as different as visual arts and theater

    Dennie Palmer Wolf

    Principal Researcher, WolfBrown

    Dennie Palmer Wolf is a lead researcher at WolfBrown, an international firm specializing in arts and cultural research and planning. She trained at Harvard Project Zero and has taught at Harvard and Brown Universities. Currently, her work focuses on the design, implementation, evaluation, and research on projects that help young people and their families’ gain equitable access to learning, culture, and creativity, in and outside of formal institutions. Most recently, Wolf has worked as a thought partner with organizations that work at the intersection of the arts, social justice, and community development, with the aim of ensuring that every child can learn, imagine, and contribute.

    Website: http://wolfbrown.com/

    Jeannette Rodriguez Pineda

    Artist and Arts Educator

    Jeannette Rodriguez Pineda is a mixed media artist and art educator living and working between Queens and Santo Domingo . She is an active book and zine artist and uses those media to explore urban communities ranging from honoring peoples’ everyday artistry to community development. She teaches for many youth-serving arts programs, including Groundswell, Queens Museum, Studio Museum of Harlem, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She founded MOVIMIENTO, a free bilingual hiking initiative that fosters inclusion and equity in the outdoors. Look for her on trails, mountains, and in streambeds any time.

  • Working Outside the Box: What do Alternative Organizational Models Look Like?

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/24/2019

    Leadership and the related organizational structure sets the tone of each nonprofit organization and provides the framework to envision what is possible. Organizational structures provide opportunities for staff to participate, influence, and ideate at various levels. This webinar will build upon the framework presented in the first webinar by providing examples of alternative organizational models. We will explore models that differ from the traditional "top-down" non-profit hierarchy and exemplify values of equity and inclusion.

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    About this Webinar

    Leadership and the related organizational structure sets the tone of each nonprofit organization and provides the framework to envision what is possible. Organizational structures provide opportunities for staff to participate, influence, and ideate at various levels. This webinar will build upon the framework presented in the first webinar by providing examples of alternative organizational models. We will explore models that differ from the traditional "top-down" non-profit hierarchy and exemplify values of equity and inclusion. 


    Check out part-one of this three-part series here: How Did We Get Here? Understanding the History of Nonprofit Culture

    Check out part-three of this three-part series here: Successful Successions: Empowering the Next Generation of Arts Leaders

    Edwige Charlot

    Community Membership Manager, AS220

    Edwige Charlot is the Community Membership Manager at AS220 Industries (Providence, Rhode Island). In her role, she facilities access to affordable, project-based, experiential learning in digital fabrication, printmaking and media arts. Edwige has worked in the social profit sector over the past decade and her previous roles at the Maine College of Art, Creative Portland, Engine both in Maine. Her community engagement and service include being a founding member of the Portland Global Shapers, an initiative of the World Economic Forum; an advisor of the People of Color Fund at the Maine Community Foundation; and the Artist Thrive initiative at the Tremaine Foundation. She earned her BFA in Printmaking from the Maine College of Art. 

    Website: industries.as220.org

    Dorian Spears

    Chief Partnerships Officer, Momentum Nonprofits

    Dorian Spears has an 18-year history as a nonprofit administration and government professional with an expansive range of program development, strategic planning, and implementation skills.  Dorian has a passion for serving community and with a culturally responsive lens she employs current knowledge and acumen while making a meaningful impact on organizational mission, vision, and values.  

    Her recent professional roles include serving as a project manager for a mayoral transition team, the community development corporation sector, and Camp HOPE Tennessee; an Economic Development Specialist with the Economic Development Growth Engine of Memphis and Shelby County; and a Project Manager in Neighborhood Economic Vitality for the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Each of these opportunities aided in crafting her focus in serving the community: the creation and designing of systems and infrastructure that enable youth, adults, businesses, and nonprofits to efficiently take advantage of services and opportunities available to them.

    As Chief Partnerships Officer at Momentum Nonprofit Partners, Dorian builds bridges across the sectors of government, business, higher education, and neighborhood leadership in the greater Memphis area to uplift what works while addressing community challenges. She also leads an effort bringing together organizations on the journey of operationalizing equity, diversity, and inclusion in the workplace facilitated by Beloved Community called Equity at Work; Dorian also facilitates sessions around this topic.

    Her community support includes Watch Love Work, a video project commemorating the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination; board service with Memphis Slim House Collaboratory; steering committee member of the local Census 2020 Complete Count Committee; and supporter of Collage Dance Collective, a nonprofit that inspires the growth and diversity of ballet. Dorian loves house music and considers herself a house head for life. 

    Website: www.momentumnonprofit.org